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  1. YosuaYosan is offline
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    #1

    Improving Reaction Time - A guide by Sir wturber of OOAKForum

    Let's cut to the chase..
    I have a slight problem in being ready to receive shots esp. after I attack.
    Rummaging my table tennis download folder..
    Ooh it's that txt file about reaction time..
    OMG GOLD!!

    Original thread:
    http://ooakforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=17443
    lol I laughed at my post there and remember that I actually haven't mastered the right way to see the ball :P

    I hope as much this post helps me, it also helps every player out there esp. developing players.
    Trust me guys, it's worth to read.

    Content:
    Yes, Fish is correct. The real issue is not primarily reaction times, but is anticipation - the ability to reasonably predict what is going to happen next. Also important, and perhaps more important is your stroke follow through, stroke preparation and footwork. In other words, doing what you can to make it easier to take action once you know what you need to do next.

    I'll walk through a stroke and return to give you some ideas about the practical steps that you can take to improve in these areas. But keep in mind that you need to practice these things. Simply being told something and understanding it won't help much. You need to turn knowledge into near automatic (subconscious) reaction. That's what practice and training does.

    First of all, the typical time between ball contacts is about .5 seconds. Watch the pros. They manage their table distance to keep the time between contacts to about .5 seconds. That's because typical human reaction time is about .25 - .3 seconds. They want consistency, so they work to get that .5 seconds so that they can make high quality shots. So the goal here is to make good use of the .5 seconds between when the ball leaves your racket and your opponent strikes the ball.

    1) The first place to save time is on your follow through. On your forehand loop, do you cross the midpoint of your body. If you do, you are making it harder to react to the next ball. So try not to cross your body even on a hard shot. If you cross your body, it had better be a strong "kill" or your opponent should be well back from the table. Rotating that much has a price. Make sure its worth it if you are going to follow through BIG. I'm sure you've seen that guy who makes a great loop or smash only to have it blocked to the open court that he can't cover because he's falling away from the table with his big follow through.

    2) Don't spend any time checking to see if your shot lands. Once you hit it, there's nothing you can do about it any more. So just assume it's going to hit where you aimed it. You've got other things to do in the next .5 seconds. Many players "strike a pose" as they wait and watch their ball land (or not). That's time wasted. Immediately after contact your priorities are to reset your feet and get back on balance. You can usually do this with a short hop backwards and a bend of the needs. Think "hit and hop." This is easier to do if your swing was compact and didn't cross your centerline as mentioned in item one. While you are hopping back to a neutral and balanced position, you should be bringing your racket back to its ready position. Don't "force" it back, just relax your arm (releasing any swing slowing tension while doing so) and let it drop back to a comfortable neutral position with your elbow near your side and the racket in front of you. From this position you can easily prepare for a backhand or a forehand shot. (BTW, do this when you warm up as well. Most players go directly from the end of their follow through to their backswing when warming up and drilling. I think this ingrains a bad habit of not returning to a neutral/ready position. So when practicing, try to relax to neutral after each stroke, then begin the next stroke. It will feel awkward, but doing this will reward you long term.) This is actually what you should think of as the end of your stroke. The follow-through isn't the end of the stroke. Returning to ready and balanced is the end of the stroke. If you can return to ready before your shot lands, you are in good shape to deal with your opponent's return.

    3) While you were returning to ready, you should have been subtly shifting your focus from the ball and toward your opponent. Where is his body going? What is his racket doing? Is he preparing to loop, push, or block. By watching his body you should be able to pick up on all kinds of clues as to what he's planning. And guess what? You are already on balance and ready to react to whatever that is because you're already in a neutral/ready position. You might want to keep the thought in mind that your heels shouldn't ever touch the ground. You are always on your toes ready to hop into position. You are gliding around - floating on your toes. If you really need to plant strongly, don't worry. Being on your toes won't slow you down. Staying on your toes is hard work. But it pays dividends. Also not planting your heel makes it less likely that you'll put nasty torque stresses on your knees.

    4) You are now in good shape to return the ball. You can probably tell almost exactly where your opponent is going to hit the ball. And guess what, you may actually have more than .5 seconds to react if you anticipate correctly and decide before your opponent hits the ball. If your opponent had to move to his right you should be adjusting to your right, not with big steps, but with a short hop or hops. If he's winding up to loop hard, you might be hopping backwards as well to give yourself more time to handle the pace. Watch the pros, they typically work themselves back from the table as the shots get stronger and faster. Note how if you watch them you can imagine them connected by rope that crosses the over the table. As one player "dances" left, his opponent also dances left. Your opponent's position dictates to a large extent where he can hit the ball. When one player can't keep up with the "dance", he usually loses the point.

    5) So you were right. Your opponent loops cross-court to your forehand ... and there you are ... waiting. Wow! You have great reflexes! Nope - not really. You just didn't waste the time that you had (about .5 seconds) between when you hit the ball and when your opponent hit the ball. Of course, you won't typically be in perfect position. After all, you may want to wait until you are sure where the ball is going. your opponent might deceive you, hoping to catch you guessing and hit to the middle or your backhand. But that would be OK. You are on balance and in a good position to move to those positions if necessary. If you do move, you move your feet first and not your racket hand which you keep in front of you. Remember, FEET FIRST! But in this story your movement will be simple. You make a short hop to rotate your right foot back and your left foot forward. You keep your racket in front of you and make make micro-adjustments (tiny hops) to your position as the ball comes closer. You only backswing when you are very sure where the ball is going and then, you don't backswing too much. In fact, most of that backswing motion should come from your hip rotation and not your arm. Anyway, since you are in perfect position you proceed to make a strong counterloop or counter drive right up the line. Your superior position would allow you to go to either corner or to the middle, but I like up the line shots, so that's where you go. This is my story after all. Of course, you don't over-rotate on your follow-through and your stroke doesn't cross your centerline. In fact, before your loop hits dead-on into your opponent's backhand corner, you've already bounced back into a ready position and are preparing for your opponent's return because you wisely always assume that even your best shots will be returned and always prepare so that you are ready for it when it comes back. If it doesn't come back, big deal. Yer in it for the exercise anyway - right? And, of course, you only noticed where the ball landed through your periphery because as soon as you hit the ball, you let your attention move to your opponent's body - which was lunging sidewise to try to block your loop with his backhand. He's lunging because he overswung which left him off-balance - silly 1400 level player that he is. You are already sizing up where he might be able to block the ball from his off-balance position, knowing that if you get into position correctly that your opponent is so off-balance and out of position that you'll probably be able to hit a clean winner without even hitting the ball very hard.

    So, it isn't really reaction time. If it comes down to that, you either played poorly or your opponent is much better than you. Reaction time schmeaction time. It's about stroke mechanics, footwork and practice. ;^)
    ==============================================================================================================

    All credit to Sir wturber of OOAKForum..

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  2. Iczy is offline
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    #2
    Great article. Thanks.

  3. UpSideDownCarl is offline
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    #3
    Absolutely fantastic post Yosua. I love this. I have had a few different coaches say the same basic information in a few words, but, the long version is very helpful. I especially like thinking about the .5 seconds issue.

    It is useful to have a high enough level player show you good form for that, because the mechanics of good form for a TT stroke, particularly the forehand, are very economical and efficient but hard to learn until you understand some of the reasons for that economy.

    If you waste effort with side to side motions, or with the blade going past your midline, or anything else in the stroke that would take you off balance, your recovery time will be affected and even if you have power, it still will not be as much power as a truly efficient stroke.

    From a biomechanical standpoint there are a few things you want to be concerned with in a forehand stroke. You want your elbow stable. The forward movement of the racket and your forearm should come from an internal rotation of your humerus bone. Your forearm is out, the elbow stays in the same place, and, as the arm rotates, and the elbow stays in the same place, your forearm and hand rotate forward. The second part of the arm movement of the forehand stroke is at the elbow joint. It would be forearm flexion. The forearm moves closer to the upper arm as in a bicep curl. When you combine these two movements, the elbow stays stable, the forearm and racket move forward and a little up. The rest of the movement of the stroke comes from the hip rotation and the weight transfer.

    If you do that, there is a lot of power in the movement, because the movement is mechanically very efficient, but the movement is not a very large movement. The word used for the stroke is often "compact". That compact stroke with the efficient movement to get the power without any wasted effort, also makes the recoil, back to the neutral position, or, set for another forehand.

    In theory, back to a neutral position is a great idea, unless you want to be one of those shakehand players who imitate the old fashioned penhold players by covering 75% of the table or more with the forehand. Or, unless you are one of those penhold players who cover 90% of the table with their forehand.

    Then, the neutral position could simply be, ready for the next forehand. And a good player with decent footwork should be able to cover most of the table with the forehand if he is set for it and sees where the ball is going next in order to move into position.

    But, a neutral position and ready for either stroke is still a good idea.

    So recoil, Recoil, RECOIL. That is the word for what you do after the followthrough that is so important. And your recoil time is directly impacted by the mechanics of your stroke. The difference between a forehand with good, efficient mechanics is hugely different than one without.

    And, without all these words, a good pro could show that in about 30 seconds, and then it will take us amateurs a few years to understand the advantages of that stroke that seems so much simpler and so much less flashy than the huge backswing and the wrap around follow through. And then, when we finally realize the advantages of the "compact" stroke, it takes us another few years to unlearn the bad habits from the old patters.

    Thanks for posting this Yosua. Love it. And thanks to wturber for doing all that writing in the first place.
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  4. UpSideDownCarl is offline
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    #4
    One more piece of info. I find that this is also where a lot of mid level players get in trouble with their serves. Often a player is so focused on having a really good serve with a lot of spin and hoping to win a point outright with the serve or get an easy kill from a setup, that, they forget to get set after the serve.

    If you are not set, and in a ready position after you serve, and as your serve bounces on the other side of the table, then, against a good player, you are at their mercy.

    Yesterday and the day before I played three different matches with three different players and I killed them on their serves simply because of this. They were trying these big serves and as I was receiving their serves I could read their body language and that, 1) they were still in the followthrough of their serve, and 2) they were either hoping I would put the ball back to their forehand or their backhand.

    Over and over, when they were trying to set up for their backhand while I was receiving their serve, I would just push short to their forehand. And when they were trying to get set for the forehand while I was receiving their serve, I would just push long to their backhand. I cannot tell you how many clean winners I got with just simple pushes. I was very entertained.

    If these three players had been set for their third ball before I was receiving their serve there is no way I could have done that. But they kept giving me easy points by trying to get set while I was receiving and hoping I would simply go where they wanted me to.

    I believe that, as long as your serve is low, getting set after you serve is more important than what you put on your serve.
    Setup 1: Blade by Nate: Vortex Spin Machine, FH Evolution MX-K, BH Evolution FX-P
    Setup 2: OSP Virtuoso Plus, FH Rasanter R 48, BH Rasanter R 48
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    #5
    Epic post, Yosua!!! For me the 3rd paragraph is the key. It's true that you shouldn't look at the ball until it lands in or out. You do your shot and immediately switch your look to the opponent and his movement. But the trouble discussed in the 5th paragraph is really serious!!

    But I think there is an another problem - what to do when your opponent makes a big topspin defensive shot? Yes, if the shot gets too high you can just smash the ball with anger, but if its highest point is equal to your shoulders then comes the difficulty - How can I use his shot to get an advantage in the point??? When I get in this situation if that shot is placed at my FH side I usually run from FH to BH (how unusual and weird you may think??) to make a slice to his FH and if he manages to return the slice to my BH I just block it to his BH side.

  6. UpSideDownCarl is offline
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by alexander_man
    Epic post, Yosua!!! For me the 3rd paragraph is the key. It's true that you shouldn't look at the ball until it lands in or out. You do your shot and immediately switch your look to the opponent and his movement. But the trouble discussed in the 5th paragraph is really serious!!

    But I think there is an another problem - what to do when your opponent makes a big topspin defensive shot? Yes, if the shot gets too high you can just smash the ball with anger, but if its highest point is equal to your shoulders then comes the difficulty - How can I use his shot to get an advantage in the point??? When I get in this situation if that shot is placed at my FH side I usually run from FH to BH (how unusual and weird you may think??) to make a slice to his FH and if he manages to return the slice to my BH I just block it to his BH side.
    Entertaining and funny, but, I am somehow missing how this has to do with the difference between reaction time and being prepared. If the ball is a high ball, then you have a lot more time to get ready for it. But, never the less, if your recoil is fast enough so that you are ready to move to where the ball will go, BEFORE,, your opponent hits the ball, then you are in a better position to have a response to any shot that comes your way.

    Now, as far as a high ball, I would watch the top Chinese players and Waldner and see what they do. The top Chinese players, these days, seem to give controlled smashes that keep the other player back and eventually the player who is lobbing misses. It is rare to see a top Chinese player, these days, miss on those high balls. I think they decided to take care of that after what Michael Maze did to Hao Shuai in the 2005 World Championships.

    The other person to watch for high balls in my opinion is Waldner. Why? Because of how good his drop shots are.

    But a ball that is only as high as your shoulder should be really easy to take care of. The high balls that are over your head and the peak of the bounce is higher than the height that you can reach your racket up; those are the ones that are harder to handle. But still, what will consistently take care of them is smashing for consistency to keep the opponent backed up, or a well placed and well timed drop shot.

    But, again, this issue really has nothing to do with a good compact stroke, a fast recoil time, and watching the opponent to see where the ball will go next so you can do good footwork to get there ahead of the ball, get your feet set and make a shot. Those mechanics would be the same regardless of what type of shot your opponent gave you.

    If you are not in a ready position before your opponent hits the ball, your stroke is too long and your recoil is too slow.
    Setup 1: Blade by Nate: Vortex Spin Machine, FH Evolution MX-K, BH Evolution FX-P
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  7. UpSideDownCarl is offline
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    #7
    As far as shifting the focus from the ball to the opponent, I am going to disagree with this. I guess you could do it. I guess many people might. But I think this is a cop-out for the fact that as many people hit the ball their gaze follows their racket's follow-through and therefore they lose their focus on the ball. Then you have to look to the other side of the table for something, to find where the ball is.

    However, if you watch the ball, after you hit it, and all the way to the other side, and you keep watching the ball fully, the whole way to the other side, the only way you will not see your opponent and his body language, is if your shot is place far enough away from him that he does not get to it. And if you watch the ball the whole time, especially as he is making his stroke, you will see his racket angle and how he contacts the ball, and where the ball is going AS HE CONTACTS THE BALL.

    One of the advantages to this, is that, if the ball does not go where your opponent wants to put the ball, you still are ready for where the ball is actually heading rather than where you think your opponent was trying to go.

    Where this is most valuable is when you are hitting with one of those lower level players who generally has no idea where they are trying to hit the ball, but wants to hit the ball as hard as they can. Someone who is wild and has not control used to be really hard for me to hit with because I could never predict where the ball would go and it never went where they were trying to put it and their body language always told me the wrong information. These days, I can usually get into position form those shots, because I see where the ball is going as soon as they are making contact. And when I am having trouble with that, I think to myself, watch the ball, WATCH THE BALL, and then I start seeing where it is going.

    I guess another aspect of this, I have an inside out shot where I use the body language that says I am going cross-court to forehand when I am going to the backhand side. Now, if someone reads backhand in the middle of my stroke and starts moving that way, my body is set to go towards the forehand so it is an easy switch, but if they stay still or move to my forehand, they are finished. So body language can be deceptive, but the contact the racket makes with the ball will tell you:

    1) Where the ball is going, and
    2) What spin is on the ball.

    There is one thing more that you need to do and that is:

    Listen to the sound of the contact which will tell you a good amount about how much spin is on the ball. This is especially important when playing a deceptive defensive player, but it is important when playing any player including a predictable looper.

    Your best bet to improve your rallying skills, is to be ready before your opponent hits the ball, and to watch and listen to the contact of the ball, for where the ball is going, what kind of spin is on the ball, and how much spin is on the ball.

    That would go for serves too. You need to watch the ball and how the racket contacts the ball for what kind of spin is on the ball, and you need to listen for how much contact is made and how much spin is on the ball.
    Setup 1: Blade by Nate: Vortex Spin Machine, FH Evolution MX-K, BH Evolution FX-P
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    #8
    Woooooohoooooooaaaaaa!!

    I'm back here to found that the thread is full o' diamonds LOL!
    Gotta take some time reading! Awesome stuff it seems, Sir Carl.

    Dang. Dan gotta sticky this thread lol.

    Thanks all for reading and remember to say thanks to Sir Jay Turberville.
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by UpSideDownCarl
    As far as shifting the focus from the ball to the opponent, I am going to disagree with this. I guess you could do it. I guess many people might. But I think this is a cop-out for the fact that as many people hit the ball their gaze follows their racket's follow-through and therefore they lose their focus on the ball. Then you have to look to the other side of the table for something, to find where the ball is.

    However, if you watch the ball, after you hit it, and all the way to the other side, and you keep watching the ball fully, the whole way to the other side, the only way you will not see your opponent and his body language, is if your shot is place far enough away from him that he does not get to it. And if you watch the ball the whole time, especially as he is making his stroke, you will see his racket angle and how he contacts the ball, and where the ball is going AS HE CONTACTS THE BALL.

    One of the advantages to this, is that, if the ball does not go where your opponent wants to put the ball, you still are ready for where the ball is actually heading rather than where you think your opponent was trying to go.

    Where this is most valuable is when you are hitting with one of those lower level players who generally has no idea where they are trying to hit the ball, but wants to hit the ball as hard as they can. Someone who is wild and has not control used to be really hard for me to hit with because I could never predict where the ball would go and it never went where they were trying to put it and their body language always told me the wrong information. These days, I can usually get into position form those shots, because I see where the ball is going as soon as they are making contact. And when I am having trouble with that, I think to myself, watch the ball, WATCH THE BALL, and then I start seeing where it is going.

    I guess another aspect of this, I have an inside out shot where I use the body language that says I am going cross-court to forehand when I am going to the backhand side. Now, if someone reads backhand in the middle of my stroke and starts moving that way, my body is set to go towards the forehand so it is an easy switch, but if they stay still or move to my forehand, they are finished. So body language can be deceptive, but the contact the racket makes with the ball will tell you:

    1) Where the ball is going, and
    2) What spin is on the ball.

    There is one thing more that you need to do and that is:

    Listen to the sound of the contact which will tell you a good amount about how much spin is on the ball. This is especially important when playing a deceptive defensive player, but it is important when playing any player including a predictable looper.

    Your best bet to improve your rallying skills, is to be ready before your opponent hits the ball, and to watch and listen to the contact of the ball, for where the ball is going, what kind of spin is on the ball, and how much spin is on the ball.

    That would go for serves too. You need to watch the ball and how the racket contacts the ball for what kind of spin is on the ball, and you need to listen for how much contact is made and how much spin is on the ball.
    I will have to think seriously about these facts. Thanks a lot Carl.

  10. UpSideDownCarl is offline
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by YosuaYosan
    Woooooohoooooooaaaaaa!!

    I'm back here to found that the thread is full o' diamonds LOL!
    Gotta take some time reading! Awesome stuff it seems, Sir Carl.

    Dang. Dan gotta sticky this thread lol.

    Thanks all for reading and remember to say thanks to Sir Jay Turberville.
    Without question, thanks to Sir Jay Turberville. His is a great post. I obviously loved it and had a lot of fun reading it and thinking about the information presented.

    And thank you, Yosua, for transporting this thread from Ooak Forum to TTDaily for the TTDaily members to consider.
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    #11
    bump
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  12. UpSideDownCarl is offline
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    #12
    Quote Originally Posted by YosuaYosan
    bump
    I've already written too much but this is a topic that should get bumped, and, better, discussed.
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    #13
    Thanks Yosua for the great article. Actually like all great reads, not only did it state the obvious it makes us think a lot ! You know what I might have figured out the antidote to my back hand problem. Probably after my forehand I am resetting with my hands too low which is resulting in my back hand topsping going long after a topspin to topspin exchanges, going to try to fix it this weekend !! Thanks again for the inspiration and the cue!
    Lets go Spinny Looping !

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    #14
    You're very welcome, Sir TTMonster.
    As much as this article helped me, I hope others will benefit out of it too.

    (subtle way to bump, eh?)
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    #15
    LOL Yosua. BTW, I requested Matt in facebook to do some strategy analysis for important games and he came up with something. Did you take a look, I sincerely hope this kind of discussion should be encouraged. I feel it will help us develop our games more instead of searching for the perfect equipment
    Quote Originally Posted by YosuaYosan
    You're very welcome, Sir TTMonster.
    As much as this article helped me, I hope others will benefit out of it too.

    (subtle way to bump, eh?)

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