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View Full Version : Ma Long also trains in Mixed Martial Arts (MMA)



MaLongFamily Fans Club
04-27-2017, 09:05 AM
Unexpectedly, Ma Long also does mixed martial arts (MMA) at the Fighting Bros Club in Beijing. He started MMA training since 2012 with wrestler and MMA fighter Yang Honggang. Ma Long has pretty impressive technique if you ask me!

Check out Ma Long's MMA training in the video here:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=01e5xg3Cbs0

htfu
04-27-2017, 09:45 AM
not on the balls of his feet for the kicks, chin up when punching and elbows down when punching is not good technique ... but mma training will certainly help his overall physicality. although i'm surprised they (cnt) allow him to train mma as injuries are fairly common when sparring. it's kinda like f1 drivers or motogp riders, thier teams don't really allow them to do anything that could possibly cause injury that would keep them from driving/riding for the team.

TTHopeful
04-27-2017, 10:10 AM
not on the balls of his feet for the kicks, chin up when punching and elbows down when punching is not good technique ... but mma training will certainly help his overall physicality. although i'm surprised they (cnt) allow him to train mma as injuries are fairly common when sparring. it's kinda like f1 drivers or motogp riders, thier teams don't really allow them to do anything that could possibly cause injury that would keep them from driving/riding for the team.

Except TTX :D https://twitter.com/F1/status/850944611686072320

http://dd7978b90kfgn.cloudfront.net/2017/04/WLQ-F1.jpeg

htfu
04-27-2017, 12:42 PM
yeah, was talking more like f1/motogp drivers riding road bikes/motocross ... ttx is far less likely to result in injury than the two i've mentioned ;)

OldschoolPenholder
04-27-2017, 03:17 PM
chin up when punching and elbows down when punching is not good technique

To be fair to Ma Long, many in MMA have poor 'boxing' skills/fundamentals.

tropical
04-27-2017, 04:05 PM
He can kick my ass ;)

MaLongFamily Fans Club
04-27-2017, 04:41 PM
Some photos of Ma Long and MMA fighter Yao Honggang. The last one is taken in May 2012.
https://www.tabletennisdaily.co.uk/forum/cache.php?img=http%3A%2F%2Fwx2.sinaimg.cn%2Flarge%2F8522b64dgy1fbzg4sq1jqj20qo0zk78b.jpg
https://www.tabletennisdaily.co.uk/forum/cache.php?img=http%3A%2F%2Fwx3.sinaimg.cn%2Flarge%2F8522b64dgy1fc2rx8d1hjj20go0m8t9x.jpg
https://www.tabletennisdaily.co.uk/forum/cache.php?img=http%3A%2F%2Fwx1.sinaimg.cn%2Flarge%2F8522b64dgy1fbzg4t8ig1j20zk0noq6e.jpg
https://www.tabletennisdaily.co.uk/forum/cache.php?img=http%3A%2F%2Fww2.sinaimg.cn%2Fmw1024%2F8b5b771fjw1dsljcf0jjnj.jpg

MaLongFamily Fans Club
04-27-2017, 04:59 PM
In an interview with Table Tennis World magazine, Ma Long said that he keeps on MMA training for years although not on a regular basis. He has only Sunday off every week and he has dancing/piano/English/sanshou (Chinese boxing)/MMA classes to go.:D

Boxing workout seems to be included in CNT physical training session.

https://youtu.be/tR_d4FF0s98

Suga D
04-27-2017, 06:09 PM
To be fair to Ma Long, many in MMA have poor 'boxing' skills/fundamentals.

True.
[Emoji2]
What i find interesting is that there are no fighters using Wing Chun Techniques in MMA at least those i have seen.

Archosaurus
04-27-2017, 06:33 PM
True.
[Emoji2]
What i find interesting is that there are no fighters using Wing Chun Techniques in MMA at least those i have seen.
Why so? In an environment full of Thai boxers and Brazilian Jiu-jitsu fighters, a martial art that has lacking takedown defence and ground fighting capability seems like a weird pick.

OldschoolPenholder
04-27-2017, 06:37 PM
True.
[Emoji2]
What i find interesting is that there are no fighters using Wing Chun Techniques in MMA at least those i have seen.

WCK (wing chun kuen) got a bad rap with their somewhat cooperative training methods and inordinate amount of time training sensitivity drills like chi sao (sticking hands)

With their emphasis on 'trapping', early WCK fighters in UFC couldn't pull off their trapping ... IMO, their training was not as realistic as it could be and too much emphasis may have been placed on training chi sao (or at least in the specific methods most WCKers train it in)

If you watch carefully in boxing only or in some UFC fights, there are elements of WCK, or more specifically 'trapping', done ... but instead of getting 'hung up' on the term trapping, perhaps 'barrier/obstruction removal' should be used ... quite a mouthful ... but basically remove any obstruction in your path so you can hit or hit repeatedly with no barriers

There were some of Anderson Silva's (possibly the best all-time in MMA or second to Fedor all-time) UFC fights where you can clearly see him use one hand to remove a barrier so that he can hit.

In boxing, some of the trapping moves are called 'pat', 'parry', etc. which in essence is the same as WCK's 'trapping' -- both styles remove obstructions to facilitate their striking

I feel a WCKer who modernizes his training against uncooperative resisting opponents would fare better if they have some basic idea of grappling.

sorry for rambling/digression -- [begin ttmonster voice] LOL at me [/voice]

Archosaurus
04-27-2017, 07:03 PM
OSPH is on the right track IMO. Wing Chun trapping techniques are applicable to MMA rules, because it's a fundamental of close range combat to redirect attacks.

Look at Historical European Martial Arts and all of the combat-ready techniques that involve redirecting blade/polearm/shield blows. Not some sport crap: actual techniques used when warriors' jobs were to do battle. I think they're pretty legitimate if you consider that background.

A good example of this is when two spearmen fight: it's a lot of wiggling and circular motions to try to get your arm to bear. It applies to fist-fighting as well, very much so.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZZjtxgUGeU

OldschoolPenholder
04-27-2017, 08:17 PM
Suga D,

You a Wing Chunner? I know both Dr. Leung Ting and Emin Boztepe have huge organizations in Germany.

Archo,

You do HEMA?

-----------

No disrespect to 'Spear-only fighter' ... he didn't feint, only direct attacks ... linear footwork, seem to have slow reflexes, didn't "get off the X", 'shield fighter' seem to counterattack - bait SOF and then counters easily ... ~2:20 SOF was fast enough to adjust and score a hit

Archosaurus
04-27-2017, 09:07 PM
@OldschoolPenholder

Sadly, no. Doesn't really exist around here. I know a lot more about fighting with bladed weapons than the average person, but let's just say that, with my current lack of skills, it would be a matter of time before I gravely injured myself if I attempted to practice with a sharp weapon.

Look at the two-handed spearman's form. He is MUCH worse than Matt, the gent on the left with the shield. There is an immense level difference. So it's a bit of a beatdown.

Suga D
04-27-2017, 09:08 PM
Very interesting. Both of you. Makes totally sense.
I guess i just have too little understanding of this.
Personally I always had the Impression that Wing Chun was in advantage to other styles because of its effectiveness although it might not be as spectacular to watch as some other styles.
Even more so after those Ip Man movies.
A friend of mine told me the first MMA fighter was Bruce Lee when he adopted techniques from other styles to create his Jeet Kun Do based on his Wing Chun foundation.
I was probably just too impressed by his historical demonstration at the international Karate tournament.

https://youtu.be/Wym1TO_cCRM
But as i said, i obviously understand too little.
And your point about grappling techniques makes totally sense too.


Suga D,

You a Wing Chunner? I know both Dr. Leung Ting and Emin Boztepe have huge organizations in Germany.

Archo,

You do HEMA?

-----------

No disrespect to 'Spear-only fighter' ... he didn't feint, only direct attacks ... linear footwork, seem to have slow reflexes, didn't "get off the X", 'shield fighter' seem to counterattack - bait SOF and then counters easily ... ~2:20 SOF was fast enough to adjust and score a hit

Sadly not, but a few friends have been practicing Wing Chun from youth days on. You're right about Dr. Leung Ting. He's quite famous here. Kernspecht, one of his students had a few schools over here too. IIRC Boztepe was one of Kernspecht's students. Afaik Boztepe left the organisation. Most likely money has been the issue.

@OP: apologies for drifting a little off topic.
Back to the point, i didn't expect sparring vid but rather some more drills to gain more mental strength, but that probably was just a little naive thinking of me.
Hope ML didn't get any injuries.

BTW: Thanks for posting

Boogar
04-27-2017, 10:07 PM
True.
[Emoji2]
What i find interesting is that there are no fighters using Wing Chun Techniques in MMA at least those i have seen.

There are some figthers that use Wing Chun, but i can't recall their names.

Archosaurus
04-27-2017, 10:09 PM
Suga, it's hard to evaluate unarmed fighting techniques on a basis of effectiveness.

Warfare has historically been based a hell of a lot more on armed fighting than unarmed. There's also the positive of armed combat, being that bad techniques have literally died out: their users have never lived to teach them onward.

Martial arts instructors are in a very different position to military trainers in the ancient and medieval age. How many martial arts instructors of past could claim that they have survived several battles against relatively equal opponents, when others have died? It is an entire different world.

Even Miyamoto Musashi, the famous Japanese swordsman, actually took part in battles, fighting for an army on the frontline and engaging in armed combat against other trained soldiers. Miyamoto Musashi's swordfighting/polearm technique has supposedly allowed him to survive the battlefield, and that is why we can't just completely disregard his speak about dueling as nonsense. Even if dueling has different "rules" as opposed to fighting in a formation against a formation.

Even someone like Bruce Lee, who supposedly got into a lot of fights in his youth, has never been in that kind of situation, fighting to the death with roughly equally trained, equally skilled warriors. Sword and spear instructors of the ancient and medieval age probably usually have, and they're training warriors who are to do battle.

We're lucky we have a pretty good idea of what ancient and medieval warfare was like and what the techniques were. Even then, the techniques and training meant entirely different things to warriors of old and modern day HEMA enthusiasts. We're just not going to war with spears and swords like we used to: so of course we're not gonna be as good at it as they were historically. Professional warriors were trained from young age to partake in something that could potentially kill them very quickly: it wasn't a bunch of joking around with techniques and philosophies.

Hell, the early Roman legions were mostly composed of draftees, young Roman male citizens of an appropriate age who were to serve for several years in combat. It was no joke at all. Just the physical requirements to march with the legion were really something difficult to understand from a modern normal civilian's perspective, let alone fighting on the battlefield.

The background for HEMA and other related armed fighting techniques come from this kind of reality. While historically unarmed martial arts have been taught to warriors, as unarmed fighting is most likely the basis of all close range fighting as it's just using natural weapons, it's just not the same. I think it mattered a lot more how effective your spear-fighting techniques were than how effective your boxing or wrestling techniques were.

Although I can't help but feel like I'm missing something, like the appliance of martial arts in other kinds of combat. But how often did civilians or dare I say even warriors really fight completely unarmed, in a serious situation?

tl;dr There has never been a cohort of Wing Chun masters fighting on a battlefield. :p