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Kuba Hajto
10-24-2019, 05:18 PM
I have a problem every time I start playing. I can't put the ball on the table. Most of the time backhand has too high arc and flies od the table or has no power but a lot of spin and hits the table before the net. When it comes forehand, it lands in the net. But after some time, it magically disappears. Not.gradually. It kinda clicks within me and then I can place the ball wherever i want with supposable the same shots. Sometimes it takes 30 minutes of hitting the ball. Sometimes 1h30. Has anyone experienced something similar?

lasta
10-24-2019, 05:28 PM
Yes, don't drink before playing.

Der_Echte
10-24-2019, 05:29 PM
Meanie !!!

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Kuba Hajto
10-24-2019, 08:41 PM
That's not really very polite. To be honest I don't drink at all and I am 100% abstinent, so that probably is not a problem. I thought about it for a while now. I think I am not generating enough spin. I guess I will work on repeatability of my brushing contact. Any input is more than welcome.

wappak
10-25-2019, 03:18 AM
always check if your on proper stance

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Takkyu_wa_inochi
10-25-2019, 06:15 AM
It’s about technique and training. I had the same problem before. I have corrected my technique. Well it took more time on FH side but I still have some issues but it’s mostly corrected.

I think watch videos do some shadow training and film yourself as well . This will help you.

bricec
10-25-2019, 10:02 AM
Even though it doesn't take me as long to adjust as what you mentioned I do suffer from something similar for let's say the first 5-10 minutes of practice.

My advice would be to take a step back and not rush. Start with simple, long drives strokes and hit the ball after it's reached its peak bounce. Refrain from increasing speed (hitting the ball later will help with that) and ask your practice partner to do the same. As you feel more comfortable you'll then be able to increase the speed and spin of your strokes.

If you look at the adjusting phase (or sometimes erroneously called "warmup") of professional matches that's actually what they do. They start with fh drives for a few strokes, then one player starts to loop while the other blocks, then they switch, then they do the same for the bh. I'm advocating for basically the same, but with way more strokes in each step and less speed in the beginning, cause let's face it we're not pro players :D

Edit: what other people mentioned about footwork and general body warmup makes total sense as well.

MOG
10-25-2019, 10:05 AM
I suffer from the same problem, I am so much better when I am warm.

I think a good warm up before playing is important, so when you hit your first ball you are already warm.

Silver smasher
10-25-2019, 10:07 AM
I sometimes have this issue but I am not a natural sportsman and have to really concentrate to play accurately. I have a player in one of my local teams who did not play all summer but turned up for one training session and played brilliantly. That is annoying!
Recently I was playing friendly games at my club and I was losing and playing some bad shots. A watcher mentioned that I was not moving my legs enough. I tried to move for every shot- even if not really necessary- and the shots went on the table. Presumably I was leaning and bending to hit some shots which is not ideal and once I started moving freely I played well- could this be the reason you start badly?

yogi_bear
10-25-2019, 10:18 AM
How long did you warm up and did you do proper warming up?

zeio
10-25-2019, 10:31 AM
A member on Mytt has a medical condition(not sure if it is 1) that sounds like hand tremor or yips or something else, that would disappear roughly 20 mins after warmup. Until then, he would have trouble landing ONLY his FH drive.

http://mytabletennis.net/forum/medical-problem-shaky-hand_topic75880.html

Kuba Hajto
10-25-2019, 10:40 AM
How long did you warm up and did you do proper warming up?

I usually do about 15 minutes of general warmup, then some minor stretching then a 5 minutes around the table footwork excercises.

Sedis
10-25-2019, 10:54 AM
Is this happening at the same venue, with the same table and balls?
Some people find it much easier to adjust to these variables than others.

burhanayan
10-25-2019, 10:58 AM
Some people likes to start warm ups very aggressively, some not. I prefer feeling the ball, relaxing muscles first.

When I am playing FH-FH or BH-BH drills out of my tempo, I tend to be too loose or too tense.

What I recommend is, you should start slow. At least request that from your partner to be. That way you will have time to realize how proper technique you have and you will easily correct it.

Remind yourself staying low.

Increase your tempo without loosing control and without messing up your technique.

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Kuba Hajto
10-25-2019, 11:03 AM
Is this happening at the same venue, with the same table and balls?.
Balls do change. When I was playing with some dhs balls i got through fast same with donic 40+ training balls. When I am playing with some crappy, weird sounding balls (40mm) it takes especially long to adapt.

Wister
10-25-2019, 12:07 PM
I think it's just normal to not have a good feeling during the first minutes of the session. Maybe if you miss alot you get tense and too conscious and then it continues longer sometimes. A solution may be to do very slow warm up (FH/FH, BH/BH) in order to get good feeling and confidence first

Personally if i play a lot (like several times a week), it takes less time to get my feeling correct

Baal
10-25-2019, 06:10 PM
How long have you been playing the sport?

Kuba Hajto
10-25-2019, 06:41 PM
How long have you been playing the sport?
Playing about 5 years. Training a bit more serious about it, about 3 months.

Baal
10-25-2019, 06:54 PM
Playing about 5 years. Training a bit more serious about it, about 3 months.

There is a lot of things it could be, and zeio mentioned an interesting and real case, albeit very unusual. Speaking generally, as one first starts getting serious and trying to use more advanced playing techniques, there is a lot more variability in your level from day to day then there will be later on. And this is likely to show up most at the beginning when your muscles are a bit cold and you are still getting your eyes used to tracking this really fast moving small object.

It comes down to mistiming. One trick is when you are first warming up is to sort of mentally make your backswing the same speed as the ball is coming to you. So if you opponent hits hard, your backswing is faster, if the ball comes slow, your backswing is slower. Bear in mind that this is more about your eyes and ball tracking then it is your actual stroke, but this will help you get everything engaged and working as best as it can as early as possible into your evening (and at the start of a new game if you had to sit down very long between one match and another).

yogi_bear
10-25-2019, 11:51 PM
maybe you just need more practice on your consistency.

UpSideDownCarl
10-26-2019, 02:22 AM
Years ago, I used to have something that sounds similar although, truthfully, it would usually only last about 5 min.

For me it felt like it took a while to get ball feel; to get the right touch on contact. I used to do something like this, but slower and more relaxed, to make it so I had ball feel before I started hitting with a person.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ezBW4kePyrc

5 min of that, for me, back then, made it so I felt the ball well on my strokes and I would start feeling like my touch and ball contact was okay. At a certain point, as my strokes improved, the wildly erratic shots before I was warm thing just went away.

But hitting slower might also be a good idea and may work for you as well.

Loopadoop
10-26-2019, 06:09 AM
I had a similar problem when I would train with a robot at home then go to play at a club. There was an adjustment period back to regular play.

Der_Echte
10-26-2019, 08:00 AM
Yes, don't drink before playing.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pl4plPGRG8o

yogi_bear
10-26-2019, 12:57 PM
I had a similar problem when I would train with a robot at home then go to play at a club. There was an adjustment period back to regular play.

This is because of the uniform spin and speed the robot gives you i think.

Loopadoop
10-26-2019, 01:03 PM
This is because of the uniform spin and speed the robot gives you i think.

I corrected that by using lower spin robot settings.

yogi_bear
10-26-2019, 01:30 PM
Well aside from that, non robot opponents do not have uniform spin and consistency of a robot so you will have to adjust.

starsky27
10-26-2019, 01:55 PM
I had a similar problem when I would train with a robot at home then go to play at a club. There was an adjustment period back to regular play.

Hi Loopadoop,
I play with a robot more than I play at the club due to shift work . I’m having trouble adjusting to playing in a club environment especially if I haven’t been for a while.
Can you give any tips to make the adjustment easier ?

Thanks.

starsky27
10-26-2019, 01:58 PM
Sorry I’ve just read the posts after your initial post . I find the anticipation element that hardest to adjust to as well.

Tinykin
10-26-2019, 02:28 PM
Proper off table warm-up is always necessary. But let's face it, hardly any of us do any. A little hand flashing and a few knee kicks maybe.
One way to get the eye-body coordination and footwork going is to do some chopping from both wings early on in the practice. Try it for 5mins.

mart1nandersson
10-26-2019, 03:58 PM
Proper off table warm-up is always necessary. But let's face it, hardly any of us do any. A little hand flashing and a few knee kicks maybe.
One way to get the eye-body coordination and footwork going is to do some chopping from both wings early on in the practice. Try it for 5mins.

So true!!! :) I sometimes backfill our league team that mainly consists of juniors (12-15 year olds) and their warmup routine consists of jogging, jumping ropes and all sorts of dynamic stretching not suited for a tired middled aged body. Super professional and it does help especially since I'm foolishly trying to play a chopping game with consist of a lot ball chasing at the back of the court.

Kuba Hajto
10-28-2019, 04:48 PM
Following up with some of my conclusions and results.


I think watch videos do some shadow training and film yourself as well . This will help you.
I think this actually helped me a lot. Watching this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Os7C24HsqlQ&amp
and shadow training gave me more confidence in my strokes and I have less examples when I straight on hit the ball way too softly. I think that it also loosened up my hands. Another nice side effects is that now I when I am playing in the office balls have enough power so they are rarely blocked.

Another helpful drill I learned on last coached session was placing the ball as close to center of the table as possible while alternating forehand/backhand drive. Apart from building up footwork it also forces you training partner to slow down.

Now after 5-10 minutes I have decent enough consistency and it seems to continue to improve.