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View Full Version : If you are a coach. What equipment would you recommend for beginners?



Jeslun
01-22-2020, 10:38 PM
Hi!:)

I am a coach only once a week and I would love to hear from other coaches or players with experience what you would recommend to a beginner.
And I referring to beginners who have played perhaps 1-3 years, in age 7-15 years old. I guess the age really doesn't matter but still...

I have always recommended a regular bat (five stars) from a regular Sporting goods store if they have played for a just few weeks.
But it's the next step I would like to hear from you guys!
The beginner now wants to compete and/or just to be more serious about table tennis and want their own custom racket.

I have asked another coach this question and in their club they recommended the blade Yasaka 2040 with Yasaka Orginal Extra XHG rubbers.
The second step for custom racket when they have gained more skills would still be the blade Yasaka 2040 but with Yasaka Mark V.
(I have myself played with Yasaka Orginal Extra XHG and Yasaka Mark V when I was younger. So I feel this is a pretty safe recommendation in the beginning)
The third step for a custom racket is still Yasaka 2040 blade with Yasaka Rakza 7 Soft rubber or was it Yasaka Rakza X Soft?:confused: hmm....
(In the moment I writing this and look where I buy my things I am not sure if it was Rakza 7 Soft och Rakza X Soft. I think it's Rakza 7 Soft that coach said).

I thinks it's difficult to write with words how good a player should be to be able to use step two and three. But I have a vision in my head and I will know when I see it.
So I hope we have open minds here.:o But we can say a beginner can reach step three in 2-3 years or more.

One time I recommended a Stiga Allround Classic blade with Stiga Cobra 2000 rubber to a beginner (he doesn't play anymore). But I thought when I saw him play with the new racket I thought it looked too difficult to play with. Because the ball trajectory was too HIGH. It was difficult to hit the table with good precision. Even I treid it and thought it was a really bad combination. The rubber was wrong decision.

For example what blade could you recommend to an older beginner at 12-15 years old? Why I ask that is because Yasaka 2040 has a smaller handle and they perhaps need a regular size. I guess almost any Allround blade will be good for a beginner but with wrong rubber it can go wrong?

Want to know more combinations. What do you recommend in your club?

wappak
01-22-2020, 11:19 PM
im a fan of 7 ply all wood so i suggest a sanwei fextra, good all around blade, it has medium trajectory and medium bounce on the net, very good feel and control and it is cheap.

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Baal
01-23-2020, 01:30 AM
Appelgren Allplay with Vega rubber. Something along those lines.

NextLevel
01-23-2020, 01:50 AM
If the beginner is committed, Timo Boll ALC with H3 Neo or a Mark V type rubber on both sides.

If the student is cheap, Yasaka Sweden Classic with a Mark V type rubber or a cheap tensor on both sides.

UpSideDownCarl
01-23-2020, 02:22 AM
In the end, you could try and come up with some kind of progression as you are trying. But really, you would be better off taking this question person by person.

A kid who has a certain aptitude for the sport could be fine with something that is fairly "advanced" as a setup. Another kid, maybe never should use something like that.

It is really hard to turn something into a formula when you are dealing with something as complicated, unique and individual as human beings.

Lula
01-23-2020, 03:57 AM
Slow as long As it is grip.

yogi_bear
01-23-2020, 04:33 AM
Typical slow chinese rubbers on an all around blade.

zeio
01-23-2020, 05:29 AM
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71Wfw7cdj3L._SL1500_.jpg

Can't go wrong. That's how yours truly started. No kidding.

Jeslun
01-23-2020, 12:12 PM
As Lula and yogi said. I agree the racket should be slow but still be able to produce spin. So they can develop good technique with courage. Is it too fast they will be afraid to do a full swing.

Any examples to typical slow chinese rubbers? Friendship729 FX Super?

If other people are curious about where I buy my equipment and what I can recommend to my novices:

https://www.ttex.se/

https://www.japsko.se/

Kuba Hajto
01-23-2020, 12:27 PM
Any examples to typical slow chinese rubbers? Friendship729 FX Super?


Also Palio Hidden Dragon, 729 "bat wings" (general purpose training rubber), Yinhe Mercury 2. This resource may prove useful https://ooakforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=44&t=25211. Iskandar taib is also user of this forum and I think he of all people is best suited to answer this question. For me FX Super (used blue sponge and the other one) is painfully slow. Based on my experience Bloom Spin might not be bad option. Not fast, spinny, cheap so it ticks a lot of boxes.

mr. tom
01-23-2020, 02:11 PM
butterfly korbel + 2 x tibhar evolution EL-S 1.9

UpSideDownCarl
01-23-2020, 02:26 PM
In the end, you could try and come up with some kind of progression as you are trying. But really, you would be better off taking this question person by person.

A kid who has a certain aptitude for the sport could be fine with something that is fairly "advanced" as a setup. Another kid, maybe never should use something like that.

It is really hard to turn something into a formula when you are dealing with something as complicated, unique and individual as human beings.

I think I should add something to this. Every TT company has blades in the All, All+, Off- speed categories that are 5 ply and all wood.

For most players who are lower level than decently advanced ****(good serves, ability to vary spin on serves with same look, good receive of serve, good pushing skills, ability to push, ability to loop vs backspin on both wings, ability to counterloop with confidence and consistency, ability to get high levels of spin and vary loop [hook, straight topspin, fade-loop], and overall ability to read spin and respond to variations given by opponent)**** for most players lower level than that description, an all wood, 5 ply blade in the All, All+ or Off- speed classes would be recommended.

That being said, every TT company makes several blades in those speed classes that would be good. The list would be too long to make. I personally am not sure kids need a TT blade with a small handle. But I have seen coaches give kids blades with special handles for kids. I have seen others say it didn't matter. Perhaps, under 8 years old it matters more than later.

With rubbers I can say the same thing. All TT companies make variations on the classic rubbers. And all TT companies make more modern type rubbers that have more control that are designed to be good for newer players as they develop their skills.

Sticking to a brand, limiting the choices, well, I don't really like that idea. I may like the Donic Appelgren Allplay more than the Stiga Allround Classic. But they are both excellent and some people will like the Stiga blade better as they have different handles and feel a little different. Same with all the rubbers. Talking in generalities is all that is needed for these kind of equipment choices.

Blades in the All, All+ or Off- speed classes should be good for any player mid-level and lower. The specifics should be determined player by player. If a player is using an Off- blade and hits a lot of shots long because the blade is too fast, a slower blade would make sense.

With rubbers, starting with a classic rubber or with one of the Tensor type rubbers that is designed for more control for beginners would be fine. The choice would be best made based on the aptitude and interest in the sport of the student. Children learn fast. There is a value to giving a child something he can grow with. An adult learner takes longer to learn. There would be a benefit to starting with easier to use equipment for the adult learning. But not necessarily too slow. But definitely not too fast either.

I think it would be better keeping open to the fact that all TT brands make equipment that would be good for every level of play even if you have your preferences.

UpSideDownCarl
01-23-2020, 02:35 PM
A side note, as a kid, I remember playing and I never remember even remotely feeling like a regular handle was a problem. I did not train with a coach. I did not play a lot or well. But I used regular rackets with regular handles and never thought they were too big for my hand.

yogi_bear
01-23-2020, 05:20 PM
As Lula and yogi said. I agree the racket should be slow but still be able to produce spin. So they can develop good technique with courage. Is it too fast they will be afraid to do a full swing.

Any examples to typical slow chinese rubbers? Friendship729 FX Super?

If other people are curious about where I buy my equipment and what I can recommend to my novices:

https://www.ttex.se/

https://www.japsko.se/


Typical slow chinese rubbers on an all around blade.

Mars 2, sanwei ultraspin, 729 super fx-el supersoft.

I have coached more than a hundred beginners in my years of coaching. if a person is coached right and used a slow chinese rubber, the level of spin he can produce is amazing when develops his strokes because the feel and contact was taught at an early stage and also that the player was forced to execute good technique to produce good spin.