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View Full Version : Strain of the back muscles during forehand topspin



ygiuseilfuhi
12-07-2021, 04:58 AM
I have noticed almost a constant pain in my back muscles when I attempt to play max-spin forehand topspin, in the region somewhere between shoulder blades, towards left shoulder blade (I am a right-handed player). The pain is located somewhere around rhomboid major muscle (I would attach a picture, but the rules for new posters doesn't allow me, so you will have to google it yourself).

Further thoughts: I feel like when I'm nervous, I'm very strained, the explanation for that is: if my back muscles are strained, I can touch the ball more precisely, which my brain thinks is required to play a very spinny topspin, and then when I go for the topspin, I either miss the ball with the racket (due to strain and attempt for risky fast light touch), or if the stroke is good, I feel certain amount of pain near left shoulder blade. Perhaps when I go for the ball already strained, the topspin motion rips through the back muscles and damages them. It can also be the contrary: sometimes I don't strain the back muscles, and when I go for a risky max-spin ball, the inertia of the hand has to be stopped with the back muscles, and the moment when I need to strain the back muscles to bring the torso and the hand back overstrains and damages the back muscles. Additionally, it may stack with general muscle underdevelopment, as I do not exercise besides playing table tennis 3 times a week for 2-4 hours.

My questions are: do you strain the back muscles before hitting the ball? Do you strain the back muscles after hitting the ball (e.g. to bring the hand back)? Have you experienced similar problems, and if so, what is your experience?

ronz91
12-08-2021, 11:27 AM
I would suggest you video your technique, upload to youtube and post a link here. Would be much easier for others to give you feedback.

latej
12-08-2021, 12:13 PM
Hi, I think ronz91 suggestion is good. If you don't want to post video of yourself publicly, just make a video, and post it via PM (private message) to UpSideDownCarl, who specializes in motion analysis, and incidentally is the moderator of this forum. I'm pretty sure that would help.

I didn't experience those problems myself, can't help. I'd say though that the hand movement can and should be relaxed, driven by the body rotation. A bit like the toy at the start of the first video:

V1 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwQfu_Xw9Ng)
V2 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i-DB_hQEKmM)
V3 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IS-uwOXXZOc)
V4 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fi_mzasEttM)
V5 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pgvNexuYmu8)

Btw. I couldn't find the 1st video with the toy, and I found couple of others first, which I am posting too. Wish the issue resolves quickly.

Zwill
12-08-2021, 12:14 PM
My questions are: do you strain the back muscles before hitting the ball? Do you strain the back muscles after hitting the ball (e.g. to bring the hand back)? Have you experienced similar problems, and if so, what is your experience?
From the beginning of the stroke until the contact I "strain" my back muscles but otherwise it's relaxed, along with my arm and neck.

You might have a muscle knot or something that's annoying you during play. I think most people had that. You can go to a masseur or get a foam roller and roll it out yourself. I would advise you to take enough magnesium either by food or by some supplement. It helps you to relax as well. If you decide to buy just get a good one. I guess magnesium glycinate is the safest recommendation. (avoid magnesium oxide, carbonate, those are useless, citrat can be OK but can make you go to the toilet)

Probably you should use your whole body and legs more for topspining. Just the arm and back is not sufficient. Good topspins come from the legs.

metthewhidden
12-09-2021, 03:20 AM
object is to hit the ball so that it goes over the net and bounces on the opponent’s half of the table in such a way that the opponent cannot reach it or return it correctly. The lightweight hollow ball is propelled back and forth across the net by small rackets (bats, or paddles) held by the players. The game is popular all over the world. In most countries it is very highly organized as a competitive sport, especially in Europe and Asia, particularly in China and Japan.

metthewhidden
12-09-2021, 03:21 AM
the net by small rackets (bats, or paddles) held by the players. The game is popular all over the world. In most countries it is very highly organized as a competitive sport, especially in Europe and Asia, particularly in China and Japan.