PDA

View Full Version : FH retooling



blahness
06-09-2012, 02:05 PM
I just added some torso rotation and fixed the elbow position during windup...still looks a bit stiff though... posted 2 unedited videos for comment!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnUcgDNne38&feature=plcp

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2I0oGGnog0&feature=plcp

Also this is a backup blade I've kept for a long time, seems that the Clipper CR is a much better blade than the Stiga Allround Wood, it seems to be less mushy and a little more flexy which is really good...It's TG3 Neo on the FH and Apollo on the BH...

DanTheTTMan
06-09-2012, 08:08 PM
For the forehands you need to be lower down and on your toes.

azlan
06-10-2012, 03:47 PM
Still that massive backswing buddy:) Look closely and you'll see that your torso did not turn..it was still very much sideways after you hit the ball.:)

blahness
06-11-2012, 12:19 AM
Still that massive backswing buddy:) Look closely and you'll see that your torso did not turn..it was still very much sideways after you hit the ball.:)

Perhaps if you did a video comparison you'll notice the changes.

No way I'm not turning my torso, just pause the video during my backswing and after I hit the ball, compare the angle and the body you'll see a significant waist rotation over there.

My backswing is already much reduced, if you notice closely my waist rotation guides my backswing, and it's not my hand pulling itself back anymore.

blahness
06-11-2012, 12:21 AM
For the forehands you need to be lower down and on your toes.

Yup I know but some things in technique are much easier corrected while maintaining a higher posture, besides the ball is pretty high. I think it's best to change a stroke one at a time not a zillion things at once.

JustAlt
06-11-2012, 06:17 AM
Why did you post the video if you don't want any advice? I'm referring to the way you answered to azlan and DantheTTman's comment's denying that you do it wrong and thinking you know it better.

You just look really stiff and glued to the floor. Being on your toes and using your legs should fix this. Also, get lower, it isn't going to ruin your technique. And about changing many things at once; why would you want to do one thing right and some other things wrong?

Btw is that supposed to be a loop or counterdrive/hit?

blahness
06-11-2012, 07:34 AM
Why did you post the video if you don't want any advice? I'm referring to the way you answered to azlan and DantheTTman's comment's denying that you do it wrong and thinking you know it better.

You just look really stiff and glued to the floor. Being on your toes and using your legs should fix this. Also, get lower, it isn't going to ruin your technique. And about changing many things at once; why would you want to do one thing right and some other things wrong?

Btw is that supposed to be a loop or counterdrive/hit?

I'm won't try to argue with you here, look at my previous videos to see how readily I accept other people's comments, I also post on mytabletennis.net forums and you can see my other replies over there. I've already improved a lot as a result of these comments, so I have absolutely no ill feelings towards other ppl's comments. However, don't I have the right to agree with some advice and question others? Sometimes the process of questioning and debating itself improves your understanding of body mechanics and stuff like that. I hope ppl are not so easily offended hehe...If I didn't want to listen I would have not uploaded the video in the first place. You're welcome to give me more advice! :)

From the other forum, I think people have commented on usage of my upper arm(moving in relative to my body), more pushing up from the legs as well as a circular type of recovery to make the stroke even more relaxed.

It's a relaxed loop if you want to call it that way. Not really going 100% for the loop, but only about 50% effort, focusing on relaxation and form. Not really a counterdrive/hit as I'm spinning the ball quite a bit.

Regarding a lower posture, I know that getting lower is good for me but a bit hard as I just recovered from a knee injury. Also, it's hard to focus on upper arm usage, keeping low, circular recovery, waist rotation, pushing off of legs all at once. They can be all good but it's better to incorporate each of them separately so that it's manageable.

I don't agree that I'm not incorporating waist/torso rotation(azlan's point of view)because that's precisely the significant change between this video and the previous one. Perhaps he could elaborate a bit more on that. Or maybe some things are more subtle and are meant to be felt and not recorded. For e.g. Liu Shiwen's strokes are pretty small and compact, but they all incorporate strong impulses(force) from her legs and waist rotation, resulting in a very powerful stroke. But if you see her strokes without seeing how fast the ball goes, you'll probably say that the technique is weak and "arm only".

Rainer87
06-11-2012, 09:59 AM
Because of your resent knee injury, you cant really give 100% and because that it is hard to comment. Still regardless your injury you could stand legs little bit wider apart and little bit more bent from knees, of course if your knee lets to do it. With FH you should be bent more forward and hit more forward, azlan mentioned as well that your movement is too much to the side. You move your right shoulder back, but you dont fully move it infront with your hand like you should be doing. I think your BH is ok, it just needs more aggression for additional speed and spin, also you could add little bit shoulder to your movement, just move it little bit infront before your stroke.

blahness
06-11-2012, 11:49 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HClWMzi3hb0
Thanks to William Henzell for providing this video at 2:50 with a highly detailed video of Zhang Jike's efficient whole-table FH movement...
This gave me a lot of inspiration, I think I've finally figured out through shadow play how to optimise the stroke(circular recovery + upper arm usage this time), I hope I can replicate this type of feeling at the table...

To Rainer87, I think the upper arm usage is what will cause the stroke not to end to the left. You see we will always swing naturally in an anticlockwise motion(as a right hander), so inevitably if we're just using your lower arm(elbow as pivot only) we'll always swing to the left provided that we're swinging correctly. When contacting the ball the elbow should be to the right of the body. It's a very very smooth anticlockwise motion and everything is done to maximise this anticlockwise movement, making it smoother and less "jerky". Also notice how the recovery motion is straight down instead of back the same way. This will help in relaxation b4 the next stroke and also help in timing.

UpSideDownCarl
06-11-2012, 02:05 PM
In fairness to blahness, I have seen him start out a little defensive and then come around. I guess when you think you have corrected something and then hear from someone that someone thinks it is still a problem, you might get caught off guard.

In fairness to JustAlt, I was wondering why blahness sounded so defensive as well. But, it is hard to hear constructive criticism so, as long as the stuff settles in right and the important information helps, then everything is good.

The video of Zhang Jike is a great example of the backswing. If you watch Jike's racket on his backswing, you can always see, at least part of his racket on the right side of his right leg.

If you watch your first video, blahness, especially towards the end of the video, on your backswing you can see your racket come out from behind your back to the left of your body. It does not happen all the time, and the camera angle is different. But your racket is always behind your body even if it does not come all the way out to the left side of your body. Zhang Jike's is always a little to the right of his body.

The result of this is part of the issue. Your contact is late. If you pause the video on contact, your forearm is parallel to the back edge of the table and your racket is in line with your body. If you pause the video of Zhang Jike on contact, there is one shot where he catches the ball late and his racket is in line with his body. In that shot he is obviously off balance. In all the other shots his racket is closer to the table than his body on contact and his forearm is at an angle to the back edge of the table.

I would say, a shorter backswing is a good idea and contacting the ball earlier is as well.

The person who coaches me told me my backswing was too big, and that my backswing should be more out to the right side than back. It is hard to change this. But it makes recovery much easier and it makes contacting the ball earlier much easier as well.

Hope this helps. You are doing a great job making those corrections one correction at a time blahness.

UpSideDownCarl
06-11-2012, 02:46 PM
By the way, if you really examine things, the info Azlan presents is top notch.

YosuaYosan
06-12-2012, 03:02 AM
Hi there blahness!
It's good to see you cranking up your forehand consistently..

I might add a thing on your weight transfer, you probably want to try this off-table..
For the best forehand stroke you will need a good body weight transfer from your right leg to your left while at the same time turning your torso.
Try shifting your weight from your right leg to your left while turning your hip off table. That would help in forming your forehand stroke..

If this is rather inaccurate please correct me for I am not yet a coach ;)
Keep training and God bless!