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revulucao
01-10-2013, 01:16 PM
Who has ever played in China? I would love to know your experience and what you think that is the biggest difference between Europe and China! Did you learn many things? What kind of things?

Thomash
01-10-2013, 07:43 PM
Richard Prause said: "The biggest difference? All best chinese players train together."

revulucao
01-10-2013, 08:34 PM
yes i known that but the Dusseldorf has half of the German national team maybe that is a setp for what they do in China

sebas-aguirre
01-11-2013, 12:33 AM
from what I read the chinese kind of leave foreigners aside a bit.
they are focused on developing their players.
unless you pay a coach for yourself of course.

brekith
01-11-2013, 07:46 PM
I've heard pretty much the same as sebas here
My friend went to Korea and he said that you can train as much as you want with great players, if you have money. If not, then you wont train with anyone.

XIII
01-12-2013, 06:20 AM
I've never been in Europe so I can't compare it to China.
I got training there once, 5 hr per day for 2-3 weeks? I can't remember the weeks.
I started getting better and better very fast when I stopped lessons I kinda slacked off and didn't play table tennis for a long period of time so I've lost so much skill. I feel it was better when you were coached privately because every student my age is at school studying very hard and I trained with children in primary school, it was kinda embarrassing. I learned from a range of things mainly of offensive style, I started learning footwork first because it was the most important.

revulucao
01-12-2013, 12:37 PM
i would love to do that in China, in China it is easy to buy like the huricane III blue sponge?

Pongfinity
01-12-2013, 08:39 PM
Actually I've been in China twice to train there a couple of weeks each time. Those trips were really nice. I was in a sports school in Beijing (same from where Ma Long and Ding Ning has come from). It was 5h training/day and 6 days/week. This school had quite young players, everything from 7 to 15- or 16- years old I believe.
The trainings were very different than European trainings. Firstly, the warming up was very long, we hit sometimes like 20 minutes only FH.. Secondly, the exercises we made was quite easy. The point in that was to do many repeats and in that way become a more secure player. Even the youngest were like machines when doing those exercises, they were so secure doing them. But when we started to play matches it was different of course, it was quite easy to win the youngest players because they didn't really have match experience (retrieving serves etc.).

The couches were quite tight on the chinese players, they really wanted them to do well when they played against us. They made sure that we got good practice, even though they didn't give us so much advices. But what they taught us was totally different things than we had been taught to here in Europe. The technique is so different (especially for FH). After some weeks of training there I had my best FH ever, but when I returned back to Finland it kind of disappeared again because nobody knows that real (chinese) technique. So my playing style kind of returned to the same old "European"-style after some months.

Anyway it was truly amazing trips. I totally recommend to go and experience it yourself also. You can't imagine the level of the players before you see them with your own eyes. We actually also got to play with maybe the best 7-year-old boy in the world, he was unbelievable good. But table tennis is probably the only sport in the world that makes it possible for a 7-year-old to be as good as many (ok/good-leveled) adults.

revulucao
01-13-2013, 01:09 AM
wow thank you very much i loved that post. And how do you contact them? how much did you payed?

dici
01-13-2013, 03:59 AM
there is a thread with this information that i think it is buried in this forum long time ago. I can't recall if the camp is open for certain period, but you can register through some agent in US. Then cost i think is somewhere around 1k USD for the one between 4-5 days.

As for the kids kind of leave the foreigner aside, I believe because english is not much learned in china until their secondary or high school. So do not expect most of them able to communicate with you, even the coach over there. Since this point is the most misunderstanding by westerner who mother tongue is english.

Pongfinity
01-13-2013, 09:25 AM
The name of the school is " Beijing shi cha hai sports school". You can search some email or something to contact them with from their homepage. I think the price something like 50-60 euros/day to stay at the sports school and train (including hotel and food).

revulucao
01-13-2013, 11:41 AM
thank you very much, i think that is too expensive no? 10 days - 500 euros...

Pongfinity
01-13-2013, 01:53 PM
I don't think it's too expensive, around 50e for 1 day hotel room, training and food is not bad at all

revulucao
01-13-2013, 02:11 PM
and there is just, hotel, trainning, hotel or you can visit a lot of beijing?

Pongfinity
01-13-2013, 04:01 PM
It's not just training. I think the 2nd practice ended at like 4 or 5pm and then you could do anything in the evenings (go eat/shopping/watch some cool shows etc). Besides that we took also a day off at some point of the week to visit the biggest tourist attractions (Great Wall etc). You can organise the trip as you self want. It was a very cool trip for us.

Markvee
01-13-2013, 05:12 PM
there is a thread with this information that i think it is buried in this forum long time ago. I can't recall if the camp is open for certain period, but you can register through some agent in US. Then cost i think is somewhere around 1k USD for the one between 4-5 days.

Sounds like that agent is ripping people off.

revulucao
01-13-2013, 05:23 PM
how much time did where there? you are convincing me to go!

Pongfinity
01-14-2013, 12:04 PM
how much time did where there? you are convincing me to go!

We were there 2 weeks and had time to do everything else also (shopping, visiting tourist attractions...), it's much training but you have time to do other things too :)

Haha yea, I recommend the trip for anyone who is interested in it, it was awesome :)

bzing
01-14-2013, 02:53 PM
The technique is so different (especially for FH). After some weeks of training there I had my best FH ever

Could you please elaborate how chinese technique is different from european? I'm very curious, is that arm swings a bit higher and european usually hit the ball a bit lower or something else

revulucao
01-14-2013, 03:10 PM
wow just 2 weeks and you have built your best FH ever. imagine 1 mouth

Pongfinity
01-14-2013, 04:22 PM
Could you please elaborate how chinese technique is different from european? I'm very curious, is that arm swings a bit higher and european usually hit the ball a bit lower or something else

It's very different. It's hard to explain but the biggest difference is that they use the whole body much better to get force to the hit. Feet in the right position and stomach tightened. Rotating with the whole body gives a lot more speed to the hit. They also focus more on speed than spin, so the racket should actually be quite open when you hit the ball. Another important thing is to keep your arm relaxed all the time, not press your racket to much with your arm. Those are the most important things..
As I said it's difficult to explain it precisely but they showed and taught us it very well. It's easier to show people how to do it than tell :P

Tom
01-16-2013, 09:43 AM
Hi guys, I went to china for one month last summer for training and to play in the China open. The main differences in China with the training is the amount of time that you play, obviously they train normally about 6 hours a day. I spent most of my time there training in a shanghai school and university and I found that the training exercises involved a lot more serve and receive and not so much regular practice.

The training was in tense and we did multi ball training everyday. It was a fantastic experience and I learnt so much in the time I was there. My personal opinion is that when you go training in china you shouldn't expect to improve a lot straight away but it enables you to learn a lot so you can continue to imprve in the future. :)

Here's me with my TTD T-Shirt in the crowd at the China Open :)

https://www.tabletennisdaily.co.uk/forum/images/tomchina.jpg

After practicing in the training hall of the China Open me and Liam met Timo Boll and Dimitrij Ovtcharov!
https://www.tabletennisdaily.co.uk/forum/images/tomchina1.jpg

revulucao
01-16-2013, 09:02 PM
thanks for all information!

sebas-aguirre
01-17-2013, 01:55 PM
Hi guys, I went to china for one month last summer for training and to play in the China open. The main differences in China with the training is the amount of time that you play, obviously they train normally about 6 hours a day. I spent most of my time there training in a shanghai school and university and I found that the training exercises involved a lot more serve and receive and not so much regular practice.

The training was in tense and we did multi ball training everyday. It was a fantastic experience and I learnt so much in the time I was there. My personal opinion is that when you go training in china you shouldn't expect to improve a lot straight away but it enables you to learn a lot so you can continue to imprve in the future. :)

Here's me with my TTD T-Shirt in the crowd at the China Open :)

https://www.tabletennisdaily.co.uk/forum/images/tomchina.jpg

After practicing in the training hall of the China Open me and Liam met Timo Boll and Dimitrij Ovtcharov!
https://www.tabletennisdaily.co.uk/forum/images/tomchina1.jpg

do you know if liam pitchford boosts his rubbers?

Tom
01-17-2013, 02:22 PM
do you know if liam pitchford boosts his rubbers?

Yes i'm sure he does, as most of players this level and also quite a bit lower level do too

Pongfinity
01-17-2013, 04:10 PM
Hi guys, I went to china for one month last summer for training and to play in the China open. The main differences in China with the training is the amount of time that you play, obviously they train normally about 6 hours a day. I spent most of my time there training in a shanghai school and university and I found that the training exercises involved a lot more serve and receive and not so much regular practice.

The training was in tense and we did multi ball training everyday. It was a fantastic experience and I learnt so much in the time I was there. My personal opinion is that when you go training in china you shouldn't expect to improve a lot straight away but it enables you to learn a lot so you can continue to imprve in the future. :)

Of what age was the players in the Shanghai school/university? Your training there seems to be quite different than mine in Beijing. We did multiball also everyday but when we had "normal" practice we didn't have so much serve and receiving. It was much more "no-serve"-exercises. I think the reason to this is that the players in the school in Beijing are younger and need more "ball on table"-exercises (train safety).

Pongfinity
01-17-2013, 04:14 PM
One more thing about how the training in China is different. When I was training in the Beijing school we played A LOT of sets/matches. We played often like half of the practice only sets/matches. And that was not only once a week but nearly every day. I think that was great. Playing matches is the best way to improve as a a player :)

ttunreal
01-18-2013, 10:41 AM
Could you please elaborate how chinese technique is different from european? I'm very curious, is that arm swings a bit higher and european usually hit the ball a bit lower or something else

You know how when you do the forehand loop, and they always say that the forehand should end at your eyebrow? Well, I watched a few videos where the Europeans forehands don't really follow that principle and they just make the forehand end on the other side of their head, meaning they swing too much unnecessarily.

And another video I watch (of which I will link at the bottom), shows that when Europeans reach and lunge for the ball (e.g. if they are on the left hand side of the table and the ball ends up being returned by the opponent to the right hand side) to do a forehand topspin and they do successfully return it and then the opponent returns it successfully as well, the player just uses backhand to, whereas for Chinese players, they lunge for the ball to make a successful forehand topspin and then, combined with footwork, make another forehand topspin. Basically, the principle for good footwork and successful technique is that rather than having one forehand and backhand (as Europeans usually do and because it's much easier which means compromising their forehand), it's better to have 2 strong forehands to ensure a strong recovery. Here's the video:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=at_ahUtnF9Q
The chinese coach's explanation is actually quite good!

Tom
01-18-2013, 12:34 PM
Yeh your right they players I was training with were between 16 and 22 so they a=were already high level and worked a lot on serve and receive training and also normal excessive to. We also did sometimes half the training sessions like match play and sets too :)

Pongfinity
01-18-2013, 12:44 PM
Yeh your right they players I was training with were between 16 and 22 so they a=were already high level and worked a lot on serve and receive training and also normal excessive to. We also did sometimes half the training sessions like match play and sets too :)

Yea, that school is probably like the "2nd stage" for the players and the Beijing school is "1st stage".

How good was the players there (what world ranking do you think the average players there would have)? Also how expensive was it to stay at the school (hotel,food and training)?

Tom
01-18-2013, 12:58 PM
Yeh exactly, it was a very high level training and the players, Normally European players can't train there but I went with a friend who's mother is Chinese and knows the coach. Most of the players would be around 300 world ranking but there were about 5 or 6 players that would have a world ranking of around 100 if they played tournaments haha. The cost was good, it was £60 per day for training 6 hours, all food and to stay in the university.

But I think this was a really good price because my friend knew the coach, normally it would be more.

Pongfinity
01-18-2013, 01:10 PM
Yeh exactly, it was a very high level training and the players, Normally European players can't train there but I went with a friend who's mother is Chinese and knows the coach. Most of the players would be around 300 world ranking but there were about 5 or 6 players that would have a world ranking of around 100 if they played tournaments haha. The cost was good, it was £60 per day for training 6 hours, all food and to stay in the university.

But I think this was a really good price because my friend knew the coach, normally it would be more.

Very nice :) thanks for replying :) what's your WR btw?

Tom
01-18-2013, 02:12 PM
Thats no problem :) I don't really have a world ranking at the moment because i don't play many international tournaments. But I'm top 20 in the uk at the moment

Pongfinity
01-18-2013, 02:17 PM
Thats no problem :) I don't really have a world ranking at the moment because i don't play many international tournaments. But I'm top 20 in the uk at the moment

Allright, it's very good to be in the top-20 :)
You should definitely also take a trick shot on video and submit it to the TTD trick video :)

Tom
01-19-2013, 04:15 PM
Thanks :) yeh maybe I should! And you as well!

Dan
01-19-2013, 04:21 PM
Thanks :) yeh maybe I should! And you as well!

Me and Tom will do some trick shots together and post it to you some time next week @EditingSports :)

I'm thinking some back shots, around the net shots and maybe a crazy cartwheel haha!

Pongfinity
01-20-2013, 10:59 AM
Me and Tom will do some trick shots together and post it to you some time next week @EditingSports :)

I'm thinking some back shots, around the net shots and maybe a crazy cartwheel haha!

Allright, I will also try to get some clips for this video :)