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View Full Version : What Is a table tennis tensor rubber???



Ali Zarei
09-29-2013, 05:30 PM
Hi guys. I just bought a Tibhar grip-s europe and I realized that people call it a tensor. In table tennis what's the meaning of a tensor rubber?
And what differences are between a tensor and a normal rubber? Like Tenergy? And how do I have to glue it on my blade?

Thanks In Advance...

Steven
09-30-2013, 01:02 AM
Since the ban of on the use of speedglue a couple years ago, table tennis companies started producing rubbers that are said to have the same "speedglue effect", but without the glue. This is done by stretching the rubber before it's glued to the blade. Most people call them Tensor rubbers. Some say you shouldn't use them in combination with old speedglue as it will somehow damage the rubber but I'm not sure about that as I've never tried it.

geotjakra
09-30-2013, 03:24 AM
Use voc free water-base glue to stick your tensor rubber to your blade. If you use speed glue which stretches the sponge of the rubber, it might make the sponge of your tensor rubber separate from the top sheet. Or lessen the life-span of your tensor rubbers.

sebas-aguirre
09-30-2013, 06:09 AM
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Ali Zarei
09-30-2013, 06:33 AM
Guys, I don't use speed glue. That means If I want to stick the rubber on the blade I should only use water-based glue on the blade and the sponge doesn't need glue. right??

geotjakra
09-30-2013, 07:01 AM
put one layer wbg(water base glue) on the sponge, one layer of glue on the bat, let them dry completely, ( the glue will become somewhat transparent when dry, usually about 10 minutes) then stick them together, make sure you got the position right the first time, wbg has no room for mistake. if you stick the rubber crooked, you need to clean the dry rubber from the bat and the sponge and start over.

AndySmith
09-30-2013, 12:21 PM
"Tensor" is a trademarked term owned by German company ESN, who make a lot of different rubbers for many different companies. Tensors used to have the tensor logo on the topsheet, and on the packaging, but recently this has disappeared for a lot of recent ESN-produced rubber. My guess is that the TT equipment companies wanted to play down the fact that so many rubbers were made in the same factory, and focus on their own branding instead. Tensors include Joola Express, Tibhar Evolution, Adidas Tenzone, Andro Rasant, Xiom Sigma, and many, many more.

Most TT manufacturers make some kind of claim about the "tensioning" of their rubbers. Butterfly, for example, call theirs "High Tension". Tenergy isn't made in the ESN factory, so it's wrong to call it a Tensor, but it is supposed to have some tension effect (although I'd say that Tenergy's success is more down to the quality of its topsheet and the introduction of a porous sponge).

You mention Grip-S Europe, which is an interesting example. It's definitely not a Tensor, and is made by Haifu in China. Some say it's a rebadged Blue Whale, but who knows? It does have some factory-tuned voodoo witchcraft though.

As for gluing - since the glue ban, the manufacturers have all moved to factory-tune their rubbers to the maximum possible. It's a risky game to use old VOC glue on modern rubbers, especially ones with porous sponges IMO. It's OK with some, but crazy with others. I had a nightmare with Rakza 7 Soft a few years ago - rapid expansion, unreliable performance, crazy shrinking later. Water-based glue is the safest way to go these days. The advice above from geotjakra is good - one layer on sponge, one on blade, wait until totally dry. Some glue can take several hours to completely dry, so just use a hairdryer if you can't wait.

Tony's Table Tennis
09-30-2013, 12:51 PM
Yep, Andysmith is spot on, and Geotjakra about glue is correct too.

Tensor is a trademark name, which means rubbers with speed glue like effects. Many companies calls them different names (as some are not made by ESN)

Also with gluing, make sure you DO NOT stretch the rubber.
They are some you tube videos on how to glue rubbers, you can check it out for some visuals

Alborz
09-30-2013, 07:12 PM
Tensor rubbers typically have a thinner and more elastic topsheet, often under some tension, and have a softer and very lively sponge. These factors tend to make the rubber a very fast at low to medium impact. Compared to the tacky and regular non-tacky rubber, much less effort is required to generate the required pace of the ball. This allows a more compact stroke, and again tend to favour the modern looper style game. The speed effect of these rubber is quite non-linear, as you get a lot of speed at low-medium impact, but do not get a lot more at medium to higher impact. The softer and very lively sponge does also tend to bottom out more quickly, giving the rubber a lower top-speed. Typical examples of these rubbers are Joola Tango, Donic F3 BS, Andro Impulse.Tensor rubbers typically have a thinner and more elastic topsheet, often under some tension, and have a softer and very lively sponge. These factors tend to make the rubber a very fast at low to medium impact. Compared to the tacky and regular non-tacky rubber, much less effort is required to generate the required pace of the ball. This allows a more compact stroke, and again tend to favour the modern looper style game. The speed effect of these rubber is quite non-linear, as you get a lot of speed at low-medium impact, but do not get a lot more at medium to higher impact. The softer and very lively sponge does also tend to bottom out more quickly, giving the rubber a lower top-speed. Typical examples of these rubbers are Joola Tango, Donic F3 BS, Andro Impulse.

Baal
10-01-2013, 04:01 AM
The term "Tensor" in table tennis refers to a specific trademark for a large series of rubbers manufactured by ESN in Germany for many companies, including Tibhar, Donic, Joola, Xiom, Joola, Andro, Adidas, and a few others I am forgetting. There are many of them sold, so many it is impossible to keep up. The complete trademark is "Tensor Bios" and you will see a little logo on the rubber and on the packaging. In official terms, if a rubber does not have that logo it is not a "Tensor". ESN has never manufactured rubbers for Butterfly, or, as far as I know, for Stiga. Therefore, technically speaking, Tenergy is not strictly speaking a "Tensor". Tensors are "speed glue effect" rubbers introduced not long before the speed glue ban in 2008. One of the first rubbers in this long series was Donic F1. There have been many generations of them, with a bewildering array of topsheets, sponge hardness, and other variations. You read different things as to how they get their "speed glue" effect, but it appears to be a combination of chemical additives to the sponge and something they add to the top sheet. Early generations of Tensors had extremely brittle topsheets and would crumble very easily around the edges---sometimes just mishitting a ball was enough to make it happen, and they would start flaking around the edges in a week or less. They have gotten better in that regard. Butterfly had more success attracting top-level players with their Tenergy series, which seems to rely more on natural rubber in the topsheet, a special large pore design in the sponge, and less on adding of volatile boosters in the sponge in the factory. After several years of delay, a few other companies have introduced their versions of this approach, such as Tibhar Evolution, Donic Bluefire, and others. If you look on those rubbers, you will not see the Tensor Bios trademark, and I do not know where they are manufactured or by whom. It could still be ESN but if so, they are moving away from their Tensor trademark for these rubbers.

Some people use the word Tensor to mean any "speed glue effect" rubber, which at this point would mean pretty much any relatively new (since 2008) rubber designed for modern topspin play. (People sometimes use the word tensor for a rubber the same way they may say "xerox" as a verb to describe photocopying something). But you should bear in mind that the way something like Butterfly gets its "speed glue effect" is rather different from something like, say, Xiom Omega or Andro Hexer. So you really shouldn't call Tenergy and its imitators tensors.

Edit: Which scanning up I see is just what Andy Smith wrote. He seems to beat me to the punch a lot of the time. LOL!!!

Tinykin
10-02-2013, 12:06 AM
I read somewhere that ESN is owned by the owner of Donic, a Dr 'Somebody'.

UpSideDownCarl
10-02-2013, 05:15 AM
Hi guys. I just bought a Tibhar grip-s europe and I realized that people call it a tensor. In table tennis what's the meaning of a tensor rubber?
And what differences are between a tensor and a normal rubber? Like Tenergy? And how do I have to glue it on my blade?

Thanks In Advance...

I would say that the post below by AndySmith covers all the pertinent information. There are other posts that have the info too. But, this has all of it and it is well organized. :)


"Tensor" is a trademarked term owned by German company ESN, who make a lot of different rubbers for many different companies. Tensors used to have the tensor logo on the topsheet, and on the packaging, but recently this has disappeared for a lot of recent ESN-produced rubber. My guess is that the TT equipment companies wanted to play down the fact that so many rubbers were made in the same factory, and focus on their own branding instead. Tensors include Joola Express, Tibhar Evolution, Adidas Tenzone, Andro Rasant, Xiom Sigma, and many, many more.

Most TT manufacturers make some kind of claim about the "tensioning" of their rubbers. Butterfly, for example, call theirs "High Tension". Tenergy isn't made in the ESN factory, so it's wrong to call it a Tensor, but it is supposed to have some tension effect (although I'd say that Tenergy's success is more down to the quality of its topsheet and the introduction of a porous sponge).

You mention Grip-S Europe, which is an interesting example. It's definitely not a Tensor, and is made by Haifu in China. Some say it's a rebadged Blue Whale, but who knows? It does have some factory-tuned voodoo witchcraft though.

As for gluing - since the glue ban, the manufacturers have all moved to factory-tune their rubbers to the maximum possible. It's a risky game to use old VOC glue on modern rubbers, especially ones with porous sponges IMO. It's OK with some, but crazy with others. I had a nightmare with Rakza 7 Soft a few years ago - rapid expansion, unreliable performance, crazy shrinking later. Water-based glue is the safest way to go these days. The advice above from geotjakra is good - one layer on sponge, one on blade, wait until totally dry. Some glue can take several hours to completely dry, so just use a hairdryer if you can't wait.

Der_Echte
10-03-2013, 03:30 AM
haha, its all good. Baal will be an excellent poster for this forum...

Everyone should pay a lot of attention to his posts, he knows where he is coming from.

AndySmith
10-03-2013, 10:14 AM
Edit: Which scanning up I see is just what Andy Smith wrote. He seems to beat me to the punch a lot of the time. LOL!!!

LOL - the time difference helps mate.

Bishop Rasta 27
10-04-2013, 04:24 AM
what a very helpful information guys...i really love ttdaily!!!
:):):)

Keep Playin'!!!