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View Full Version : How to coach a 7 year old?



mahomedy13
12-07-2014, 03:09 PM
My 7 year old brother is starting to play.

I do not want him to learn playing incorrectly.

Any advice on how to coach that age etc.

Videos and info all will be appreciated.

Laki Sultan
12-07-2014, 03:34 PM
Same for me. i`m waiting

Tinykin
12-07-2014, 04:19 PM
It depends on each child. Is he generally sporty or competitive. If yes, keep it fun and competitive at first. Competitive also means pushing himself. Can he hit the ball 5, 10 times in a row and so on? Can he make an off-table backspin return? If you are worried about technique, take them to a coach and stand-by as they play. Pick as much from the coach as possible.
But over all, kids of that age love the increased attention of their Dad, or older brother caused by playing. So simply hanging with them and playing with them is sometimes all they need. At some stage a spark will be lit and they'll want to play for the sport itself. But no matter how old or successful they get, they'll still treasure their Dad/brother approval the most.

Dan
12-07-2014, 07:41 PM
Awesome stuff! Firstly I think its great you've asked the question. Learning from others is probably the best way to help develop your coaching. @Tinykin has come up with some great ideas.

I think make the sessions as creative and fun as possible. Get him to hit down targets (count numbers). Get him to play in a small club with kids his age if possible. Fun, fun, fun! If you enjoy it, your bro will enjoy it!

Good luck and keep us posted here on how it goes :)

mahomedy13
12-07-2014, 08:08 PM
Awesome stuff! Firstly I think its great you've asked the question. Learning from others is probably the best way to help develop your coaching. @Tinykin has come up with some great ideas.

I think make the sessions as creative and fun as possible. Get him to hit down targets (count numbers). Get him to play in a small club with kids his age if possible. Fun, fun, fun! If you enjoy it, your bro will enjoy it!

Good luck and keep us posted here on how it goes :)

Will do all these things.Thanks for the advice everyone.

I will keep everyone posted about how its getting along.

Tony's Table Tennis
12-07-2014, 09:04 PM
It would depend on the player, the players environment (playing brother/father as explained above), as well as the coach
The coach is the most crucial part, but again, is the player serious enough for a coach and in a group of players of the same age.
I personally oppose coaching own family members, uneless on is a proper coach (gone there, done that as a player etc). There is a saying in Chinese for a few thousands years already, "it is always more difficult to teach your own kids."

7 years old in the "west" is very young, but in the east or matured TT countries, 7 years old can already have great discipline and have the desire to put in many hours of hard table tennis trainined a day.

I worked with 7 years old from a few countries, so that is my experience, it all depends on the player and the players environment and to define what is the goal of everything. Maybe it is just to have fun and have a good time (then premade bats can do) etc

yogi_bear
12-08-2014, 01:58 AM
for a year, emphasize on teaching the right basic strokes, footwork and more on timing, brushing the ball. teach gameplay, maybe after a year. it is slow but the results are amazing.

ttnb
12-08-2014, 02:14 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twwbWhms67c

Here you can find the training program for kids in China. It may help.

joskelly
12-09-2014, 08:43 AM
As father to a very keen player who has just turned nine I can share some of my own experiences. Firstly, does your little brother like table tennis? If he doesn't you will struggle but let's assume he does. Find other kids his own age to play against. Even if it's a kid from down the road. Kids play best against kids if they have the chance.I can only speak for the UK but my son plays in schools tournaments and he is very lucky to have a committed coach that runs sessions at his school and organises matches against other schools. If his school doesn't do table tennis yet why not see if you can help them start? The UK has a national schools tournament for both teams and individuals every year. Get him enrolled in a club which caters for youngsters. We have a junior club my son goes to weekly but there are also junior training days held about once per month in our nearest city that he attends sometimes. Play him as much as HE wants at home. Don't force drills on him too soon but sneak them in under the pretence of warm up time. Vary the games - use handicaps to even it out and practice different shots between games. Find tournaments for him to participate in. Kids love to be aiming for something and if you can find a tournament with an under 10 category he will train that little bit harder in the run up to it. If he get's thrashed the first time he goes then he is only joining the ranks of every other kid at their first tournament and he then knows where he needs to aim for at the next one. If he starts now he'll be winning all the events when he is at the top of the age range.
A lot of national TT associations put on short training sessions for adults who want to coach kids that give lots of good ideas that would help you. See if you can find one of these to go on.
Kids love playing but they hate losing too. Make sure that whatever you do gives enough of a balance between keeping him grounded and not getting demoralised. I've read quite a bit of research that shows TT is excellent for the mental development of kids so anything you do with him will have long term benefits even if he doesn't carry on with it in later years. Now my son has become quite a proficient player he has more opportunities open to him. He plays in the local adult league and can more than hold his own and participates in a regional junior league as well as going to tournaments and he now really loves table tennis.

mahomedy13
12-09-2014, 09:01 AM
unfortunately,i stay in an area that has no clubs close by.All training will be done by me at home.

He enjoys playin with me,and so far his forehand loop in quite good(but not consistent).

No school for the moment,as we are on summer holiday.

mahomedy13
12-09-2014, 09:02 AM
But thanks for the advice.I will try to put all the ideas together and create a good training plan for him

Tony's Table Tennis
12-09-2014, 09:45 AM
But thanks for the advice.I will try to put all the ideas together and create a good training plan for him

Well, judging by all the post you made in a coaching manner in the forums, I'm sure this can be an easy task for you

mahomedy13
12-09-2014, 10:38 AM
Well, judging by all the post you made in a coaching manner in the forums, I'm sure this can be an easy task for you

With an adult,i will be able to train them.they are capable of understanding easily compared to a child,who can get distracted easily.

the_gift
12-09-2014, 02:31 PM
After 1 year playing TT my kid lost interest to this sport, now he is almost 13 and after 3-4 years of training he is very successful swimmer :)

Tony's Table Tennis
12-09-2014, 04:10 PM
After 1 year playing TT my kid lost interest to this sport, now he is almost 13 and after 3-4 years of training he is very successful swimmer :)


Very good.
One of South Africa's most succesful sport star at the moment is a swimmer.
If he had chosen table tennis, he would be unknown today, as South Africa does not have a structure for one to become professional (where swimming does)
I would only get my kids invovled with TT socially, and never serious. For serious there are so many other sports to choose from (with more meaning on the long run)

mahomedy13
12-29-2014, 01:55 PM
Update:

I have found a lightweight blade with rubbers for him(157g).

His forehand loop has developed well,though not very consistent.he can loop 4-5 balls most of the time.the only difficulty,other than consistency,is looping high balls.

However,with a bit more practice,i am positive that the consistency will increase.