• Join our newsletter: 
  • Welcome Guest


    Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
    Results 61 to 75 of 75
    1. Top | #61
      Paul Drinkhall is offline
      This user has no status.
       
      Verified Pro Player
      TTD Member Country: Great Britain
      Paul Drinkhall's Avatar
      Equipment:
      Blade TIBHAR Samsonov Carbon Stratus
      Forehand Rubber TIBHAR Evolution MX-P
      Backhand Rubber TIBHAR Evolution MX-P

      Join Date
      Mar 2015
      Location
      Chertsey, Surrey & Bremen, Germany
      Posts
      75
      Reviews
      Read 4 Reviews
      Liked 85 Times in 31 Posts
      Quote Originally Posted by ivelin888 View Post
      Hi Paul,

      I need a help about choosing my playstyle! I practice close to the table, but when i'm in a match my style isn't aggressive. I do chops, blocks and forehand topspin, smash. I usually don't use backhand topspin. So, my teammates and my coach thinks about changing my style to a modern defense. But people tell that the new polly ball is disadvantage for a defenders and i'm worried if I do a mistake (the change of my style). I think I have that "natural feeling", which really helps defenders and I can chop really good. So, do I have to change my style to modern defender (which is in my blood I guess) or I have to keep practicing as an attacker, because with the new polly ball aggressive topspin players will beat me? Please help me with this decide ... I will change my rubbers and I must choose from inverted and long pimple rubber on the backhand side (FH rubber will be inverted for attacks) .

      Greetings, Ivelin
      Hi Ivelin888 - thanks for the question! This is a dilemma I have seen a lot of players face. It seems some players do seem to have a natural timing point that is 'later' than others - meaning the seem to like to let the ball before playing it, it is innate to them. Also, some players have a lot of natural feeling to generate spin, so these two qualities combined would suggest that it is a good recipe to be successful as a defensive player.

      The modern defensive style will still have a place in the game, with the new plastic ball as well. Do not concentrate to much on what advantages/disadvantages that there are to this. Joo Se Hyuk and Panagiotis Gionis will not see the ranking change dramatically because of the new ball - it's just a case of adapting. Don't let this influence your choice, it's about how hard and long you are willing to practice on how quick you can change and how good you get!

      If you are inclined in a match to step back and play with feeling then it is a good idea to perhaps consider defending and attacking at the opertune moment. Another player to watch with this style is Ruwen Filus from Germany. JUST REMEMBER - this type of change will not happen quickly. You must invest time to change your style. I would absolutely recommend to learn to chop on both sides of the bat with inverted rubber first, get a good solid technique, and learn to be consistent.

      When you have good chopping technique on both sides, learn to float the ball back with the same action. Then you might consider playing with long pimples on one side, before learning to twiddle. This all takes time and practice and experience so don't be put off if at first you lost to player you might have beat attacking - think of your long term goal, and be patient!

      Good luck with is, and the ultimate answer to this question is - only you know which style is best for you. Hope this helps!

    2. The Following 3 Users Like Paul Drinkhall's Post:

      anchorschmidt (05-20-2015),Der_Echte (05-21-2015),Rajah* (05-24-2015)

    3. Top | #62
      ivelin888 is offline
      This user has no status.
       
      TTD Member Country: Bulgaria

      Equipment:
      Blade Andro Kinetic Record OFF-
      Forehand Rubber Butterfly Tenergy 05 Black
      Backhand Rubber Butterfly Tenergy 64 Red

      Join Date
      May 2015
      Posts
      12
      Reviews
      Read 0 Reviews
      Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
      Quote Originally Posted by Paul Drinkhall View Post
      Hi Ivelin888 - thanks for the question! This is a dilemma I have seen a lot of players face. It seems some players do seem to have a natural timing point that is 'later' than others - meaning the seem to like to let the ball before playing it, it is innate to them. Also, some players have a lot of natural feeling to generate spin, so these two qualities combined would suggest that it is a good recipe to be successful as a defensive player.

      The modern defensive style will still have a place in the game, with the new plastic ball as well. Do not concentrate to much on what advantages/disadvantages that there are to this. Joo Se Hyuk and Panagiotis Gionis will not see the ranking change dramatically because of the new ball - it's just a case of adapting. Don't let this influence your choice, it's about how hard and long you are willing to practice on how quick you can change and how good you get!

      If you are inclined in a match to step back and play with feeling then it is a good idea to perhaps consider defending and attacking at the opertune moment. Another player to watch with this style is Ruwen Filus from Germany. JUST REMEMBER - this type of change will not happen quickly. You must invest time to change your style. I would absolutely recommend to learn to chop on both sides of the bat with inverted rubber first, get a good solid technique, and learn to be consistent.

      When you have good chopping technique on both sides, learn to float the ball back with the same action. Then you might consider playing with long pimples on one side, before learning to twiddle. This all takes time and practice and experience so don't be put off if at first you lost to player you might have beat attacking - think of your long term goal, and be patient!

      Good luck with is, and the ultimate answer to this question is - only you know which style is best for you. Hope this helps!
      Thanks for the answer. It helps a lot !

    4. Top | #63
      TTournaments is offline
      This user has no status.
       
      Established TTD Member Country: Germany


      Join Date
      Oct 2013
      Posts
      157
      Reviews
      Read 0 Reviews
      Liked 24 Times in 21 Posts
      Hey Paul,
      I see many pro players always stepping back when the opponent attacks, if they are not able to play a good counter topspin. Then they are fishing the ball from half distance. It's not like the classical balloon defence. Could you tell me more about that shot?

    5. Top | #64
      Der_Echte is offline
      says Grand Consultant to the Office
      of the Goon Squad
       
      Master TTD Member Country: South Korea
      Der_Echte's Avatar
      Equipment:
      Blade Nexy Batos ALC
      Forehand Rubber Tibhar MX-K
      Backhand Rubber Tibhar FX-S

      Join Date
      Sep 2011
      Location
      Sacramento, USA
      Posts
      8,890
      Reviews
      Read 27 Reviews
      Liked 9,299 Times in 4,810 Posts
      I have always respected the defensive styles and their "Right" to prosper, even if I have zero inclination to play such a style. I have been among the very vocal every time a rule or equipment change occurs that will diminish the styles. TT is becoming less and less diverse. The unspoken thing on forums is how fast penhold grip players are becoming less in amature and pro ranks.
      President, Korea Foreign Table Tennis Club. Hit us up on TTD or Facebook
      http://www.facebook.com/koreaforeignttc

      Janitor at NexyUSA TT Equipment Shop
      http://www.nexyusa.com

      View our Lame Nexy USA corporate FB page
      http://www.facebook.com/nexyusa

    6. Top | #65
      anchorschmidt is offline
      This user has no status.
       
      Senior TTD Member Country: Germany

      Equipment:
      Blade OSP Virtuoso
      Forehand Rubber BH: Hexer Duro
      Backhand Rubber FH: Vega Pro

      Join Date
      Apr 2014
      Posts
      636
      Reviews
      Read 7 Reviews
      Liked 680 Times in 295 Posts
      Quote Originally Posted by Der_Echte View Post
      I have always respected the defensive styles and their "Right" to prosper, even if I have zero inclination to play such a style. I have been among the very vocal every time a rule or equipment change occurs that will diminish the styles. TT is becoming less and less diverse. The unspoken thing on forums is how fast penhold grip players are becoming less in amature and pro ranks.
      Very true, but wouldn't penhold eventually fade out anyway in the pro scene? Ever since players are looping everything from the backhand, penhold is at a severe disadvantage. Sure, Wang Hao and Xu Xin have RPBs to rival shakehand players but RPB is much harder to learn compared to the normal backhand.

      However, the same rules do not apply to mere mortals in the amateur levels. The short-game advantages of the penhold grip and a good third-ball strategy should be enough to beat any shakehand player outside the top 200. I think that the decline in the amateur level has to do with less penhold coaching.

    7. Top | #66
      Paul Drinkhall is offline
      This user has no status.
       
      Verified Pro Player
      TTD Member Country: Great Britain
      Paul Drinkhall's Avatar
      Equipment:
      Blade TIBHAR Samsonov Carbon Stratus
      Forehand Rubber TIBHAR Evolution MX-P
      Backhand Rubber TIBHAR Evolution MX-P

      Join Date
      Mar 2015
      Location
      Chertsey, Surrey & Bremen, Germany
      Posts
      75
      Reviews
      Read 4 Reviews
      Liked 85 Times in 31 Posts
      Quote Originally Posted by TTournaments View Post
      Hey Paul,
      I see many pro players always stepping back when the opponent attacks, if they are not able to play a good counter topspin. Then they are fishing the ball from half distance. It's not like the classical balloon defence. Could you tell me more about that shot?
      Hi TTournaments - yes, this is common. It gives you time to look for the counter topspin if you are out of position, that extra time to then move into a proper position is vital. It is not a 'baloon defence' as you say, it is different to this. The ball is played with some topspin, so it kicks forward and is harder to deal with. A baloon defence style lob bounces much higher so you have time to prepare and smash, this type of shot actually kicks towards you and is difficult to hit hard, especially if it is played deep. Because it is harder for your opponent to hit the ball hard, you then have time to prepare for the counter attack away from the table and get back in the rally, or play another shot like this to keep the pressure on your opponent. Applegren did it very effectively in the late eighties and early nineties, though this shot is slightly different.

      Hope that explains!

    8. Top | #67
      Paul Drinkhall is offline
      This user has no status.
       
      Verified Pro Player
      TTD Member Country: Great Britain
      Paul Drinkhall's Avatar
      Equipment:
      Blade TIBHAR Samsonov Carbon Stratus
      Forehand Rubber TIBHAR Evolution MX-P
      Backhand Rubber TIBHAR Evolution MX-P

      Join Date
      Mar 2015
      Location
      Chertsey, Surrey & Bremen, Germany
      Posts
      75
      Reviews
      Read 4 Reviews
      Liked 85 Times in 31 Posts
      Quote Originally Posted by anchorschmidt View Post
      Very true, but wouldn't penhold eventually fade out anyway in the pro scene? Ever since players are looping everything from the backhand, penhold is at a severe disadvantage. Sure, Wang Hao and Xu Xin have RPBs to rival shakehand players but RPB is much harder to learn compared to the normal backhand.

      However, the same rules do not apply to mere mortals in the amateur levels. The short-game advantages of the penhold grip and a good third-ball strategy should be enough to beat any shakehand player outside the top 200. I think that the decline in the amateur level has to do with less penhold coaching.
      Hi Anchorshmidt - Thanks for the comment! I agree on the fact that the penhold grip is used much less now due to less coaches teaching this style. What I slightly disagree on are the other points.

      In the late eighties and early nineties European players learned that attacking the backhand of a penhold player with heavy topspin left the Chinese very limited in what they could do. Speed glue helped in this respect as the speed and spin generated were much better than from previous equipment. At the same time, the 'advanced' service grip of the Europeans developed in the early to mid eighties removed the advantage penholders had when serving. Liu Guoliang then appeared in the early to mid nineties as a traditional Chinese hitter but with one difference - on a pushed ball, he would use the backhand side of his racket to lift the ball before then attacking with his forehand. No one predicted at the time how this would start to pave the way for the return of the penhold player, albeit a much improved version.

      This style was then developed further by Ma Lin, Wang Hao, and of course Xu Xin and the highest level. I actually think that players who are taught from the beginning the reverse penhold backhand are at no disadvantage at all. The strokes are equally as easy to perform in my opinion - it is down to the individual which way they find easiest!

      Also, the advantages the penhold grip brings to the short game are in my opinion not so huge that they should beat any player outside the top 200. Again, it really depends more on the player and the technique around the net on the short game more than any massive advantage presented by the penhold style.

    9. The Following User Likes Paul Drinkhall's Post:

      anchorschmidt (05-22-2015)

    10. Top | #68
      Der_Echte is offline
      says Grand Consultant to the Office
      of the Goon Squad
       
      Master TTD Member Country: South Korea
      Der_Echte's Avatar
      Equipment:
      Blade Nexy Batos ALC
      Forehand Rubber Tibhar MX-K
      Backhand Rubber Tibhar FX-S

      Join Date
      Sep 2011
      Location
      Sacramento, USA
      Posts
      8,890
      Reviews
      Read 27 Reviews
      Liked 9,299 Times in 4,810 Posts
      Quote Originally Posted by anchorschmidt View Post
      Very true, but wouldn't penhold eventually fade out anyway in the pro scene? Ever since players are looping everything from the backhand, penhold is at a severe disadvantage. Sure, Wang Hao and Xu Xin have RPBs to rival shakehand players but RPB is much harder to learn compared to the normal backhand.

      However, the same rules do not apply to mere mortals in the amateur levels. The short-game advantages of the penhold grip and a good third-ball strategy should be enough to beat any shakehand player outside the top 200. I think that the decline in the amateur level has to do with less penhold coaching.
      I can speak about the situation in Korean amature TT, since I was there 4 yrs at amature clubs. It seemed like almost ALL the coaches around 2008 collectively made a campaign against penhold. They all taught it, but their rationale was that a shakehand BH is both stable in defense and giving opportunity to make a FH next ball, plus the attacking capabilities were much better, so they all told new players they should go shakehand, and they did their damnedest best to convince existing PH players to go SH. Half of the J-Pen crowd were well over 40 and had no inclination of learning again. Half of them converted and a yr or two later got back to their former level.

      A FEW went to C-Pen and played RPB style or had LP on their BH for a change of spin/pace to setup their FH, some even made an attacking game with OX. (hitting with the OX)

    11. The Following User Likes Der_Echte's Post:

      Paul Drinkhall (05-26-2015)

    12. Top | #69
      anchorschmidt is offline
      This user has no status.
       
      Senior TTD Member Country: Germany

      Equipment:
      Blade OSP Virtuoso
      Forehand Rubber BH: Hexer Duro
      Backhand Rubber FH: Vega Pro

      Join Date
      Apr 2014
      Posts
      636
      Reviews
      Read 7 Reviews
      Liked 680 Times in 295 Posts
      Quote Originally Posted by Paul Drinkhall View Post
      Hi Anchorshmidt - Thanks for the comment! I agree on the fact that the penhold grip is used much less now due to less coaches teaching this style. What I slightly disagree on are the other points.

      In the late eighties and early nineties European players learned that attacking the backhand of a penhold player with heavy topspin left the Chinese very limited in what they could do. Speed glue helped in this respect as the speed and spin generated were much better than from previous equipment. At the same time, the 'advanced' service grip of the Europeans developed in the early to mid eighties removed the advantage penholders had when serving. Liu Guoliang then appeared in the early to mid nineties as a traditional Chinese hitter but with one difference - on a pushed ball, he would use the backhand side of his racket to lift the ball before then attacking with his forehand. No one predicted at the time how this would start to pave the way for the return of the penhold player, albeit a much improved version.

      This style was then developed further by Ma Lin, Wang Hao, and of course Xu Xin and the highest level. I actually think that players who are taught from the beginning the reverse penhold backhand are at no disadvantage at all. The strokes are equally as easy to perform in my opinion - it is down to the individual which way they find easiest!

      Also, the advantages the penhold grip brings to the short game are in my opinion not so huge that they should beat any player outside the top 200. Again, it really depends more on the player and the technique around the net on the short game more than any massive advantage presented by the penhold style.
      Thanks a lot for replying, very enlightening answer

    13. Top | #70
      TTournaments is offline
      This user has no status.
       
      Established TTD Member Country: Germany


      Join Date
      Oct 2013
      Posts
      157
      Reviews
      Read 0 Reviews
      Liked 24 Times in 21 Posts
      Quote Originally Posted by Paul Drinkhall View Post
      Hi TTournaments - yes, this is common. It gives you time to look for the counter topspin if you are out of position, that extra time to then move into a proper position is vital. It is not a 'baloon defence' as you say, it is different to this. The ball is played with some topspin, so it kicks forward and is harder to deal with. A baloon defence style lob bounces much higher so you have time to prepare and smash, this type of shot actually kicks towards you and is difficult to hit hard, especially if it is played deep. Because it is harder for your opponent to hit the ball hard, you then have time to prepare for the counter attack away from the table and get back in the rally, or play another shot like this to keep the pressure on your opponent. Applegren did it very effectively in the late eighties and early nineties, though this shot is slightly different.

      Hope that explains!
      Thanks for your long answer!I saw Appelgren relying on that shot really often and most of the time with much success. You said that Appelgrens shot was different - where were the differences?

    14. Top | #71
      Paul Drinkhall is offline
      This user has no status.
       
      Verified Pro Player
      TTD Member Country: Great Britain
      Paul Drinkhall's Avatar
      Equipment:
      Blade TIBHAR Samsonov Carbon Stratus
      Forehand Rubber TIBHAR Evolution MX-P
      Backhand Rubber TIBHAR Evolution MX-P

      Join Date
      Mar 2015
      Location
      Chertsey, Surrey & Bremen, Germany
      Posts
      75
      Reviews
      Read 4 Reviews
      Liked 85 Times in 31 Posts
      Quote Originally Posted by TTournaments View Post
      Thanks for your long answer!I saw Appelgren relying on that shot really often and most of the time with much success. You said that Appelgrens shot was different - where were the differences?
      Hi TTournaments - no problem, the slight difference was that Applegren played it with much more variation, sometimes more topspin and sometimes flatter, and then of course more attacking also, he would physically loop the ball with speed from this distance as well rather then just play defensive. It was the style really that was different.

    15. Top | #72
      slevin is offline
      This user has no status.
       
      Established TTD Member Country: United States


      Join Date
      Sep 2012
      Posts
      107
      Reviews
      Read 1 Reviews
      Liked 39 Times in 27 Posts
      Hi Paul,

      I like how much court you can cover on your FH relative to the rest of the European pros! I guess your hard work on footwork pays dividends.

      At this stage of your career, is it just maintenance / injury avoidance / current practice times that determine your performance in tournaments or do you feel that you still have 'tricks to learn'?

      As an example - would it be possible (at this stage), to say, decide that in the next 3 months, in addition to your regular practices, you would master all of Hao Shuai's serves (great serve variety - he can serve no-spins off the edge of his racket) and then spend the next 2 months perfecting them. Would it help?

    16. The Following User Likes slevin's Post:

      NextLevel (05-27-2015)

    17. Top | #73
      slevin is offline
      This user has no status.
       
      Established TTD Member Country: United States


      Join Date
      Sep 2012
      Posts
      107
      Reviews
      Read 1 Reviews
      Liked 39 Times in 27 Posts
      Hearty congratulations on Douglas!!

    18. Top | #74
      Paul Drinkhall is offline
      This user has no status.
       
      Verified Pro Player
      TTD Member Country: Great Britain
      Paul Drinkhall's Avatar
      Equipment:
      Blade TIBHAR Samsonov Carbon Stratus
      Forehand Rubber TIBHAR Evolution MX-P
      Backhand Rubber TIBHAR Evolution MX-P

      Join Date
      Mar 2015
      Location
      Chertsey, Surrey & Bremen, Germany
      Posts
      75
      Reviews
      Read 4 Reviews
      Liked 85 Times in 31 Posts
      Quote Originally Posted by slevin View Post
      Hi Paul,

      I like how much court you can cover on your FH relative to the rest of the European pros! I guess your hard work on footwork pays dividends.

      At this stage of your career, is it just maintenance / injury avoidance / current practice times that determine your performance in tournaments or do you feel that you still have 'tricks to learn'?

      As an example - would it be possible (at this stage), to say, decide that in the next 3 months, in addition to your regular practices, you would master all of Hao Shuai's serves (great serve variety - he can serve no-spins off the edge of his racket) and then spend the next 2 months perfecting them. Would it help?
      Hi Slevin - thank you, mother and baby Douglas both doing well! Thank you for the compliment on my footwork, my coach Jia Ya Liu spent lots of time instilling good footwork technique with me through multi ball and hard regular and irregular footwork exercises when I was a young cadet and junior player.

      At this stage of my career there are still new things to learn for sure. Of course I must pay respect to injury prevention and 'peaking' for events, but there are improvements I can still make to my game, which is good as it means potentially I can better myself and move futher up the Wirld Ranking list. My highest so far is No.33 in the world, and I still think there are technical areas of my game I could improve!

    19. Top | #75
      TTHopeful is offline
      says Dima... Amazing...
       
      Master TTD Member Country: England
      TTHopeful's Avatar
      Equipment:
      Blade Waldner Carbon
      Forehand Rubber Hurricane 3
      Backhand Rubber Tenergy 05

      Join Date
      Oct 2010
      Posts
      2,115
      Reviews
      Read 19 Reviews
      Liked 829 Times in 542 Posts
      Congratulations on your new baby boy Paul. There is a topic congratulating you here http://www.tabletennisdaily.co.uk/fo...ions-in-Order-!

    Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234

    Tags for this Thread

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •  
    Log in or Register
    BACK TO TOP