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    #1

    DHS hurricane 3 neo normal vs. provincial

    Is there any difference in DHS hurricane 3 neo and hurricane 3 neo provincial?
    Ans if so which difference? (except of price )
    I dont have experience with that

    They have different versions of this rubber on web of tabletennis11

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    #2
    Yes there's a difference. Please read the tabletennis 11 indepth comparison since you are contemplating a purchase from them:

    http://blog.tabletennis11.com/dhs-hu...vincial-review

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    #3
    oh thanks i found something - at the end of video there you can see provencial one is more curved. I think the only difference is booster used on provencial version.

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    #4
    Hijacking this thread for more h3 neo related questions.

    I've played with both 39 degrees and 40 degrees (regular, not prov) on penhold blades and I like both. I'm now switching to shakehand (yinhe v14) and having a poly ball is making my decision tougher.

    With the new poly ball, should I forgo the 39 degrees and get the 40 degrees? I would opt for the 39 if we were still using celluloid as this is the feel that I'm looking for, but I hear harder sponges are recommended for the newer ball. Will a 40 degree sponge feel a little softer with the heavier ball than than it would with a celluloid ball? Will a 39 degree sponge lack higher gears at mid distance with the new ball? i have not developed enough of a touch with my shakehand that I can switch to a hard sponge right away, unlike penhold, for which I have I have technique and conditioning.

    Long story short - with celluloid ball, 39 degrees is perfect and 40 degrees is too hard for my switch to shakehand, as 39 degrees still has capacity to play long distance. Is 39 degrees too soft for poly ball and will it bottom out away from the table? Will 40 degrees feel softer?

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    #5
    so you are satisfied with normal DHS H3 Neo thanks !!!

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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by otesan
    so you are satisfied with normal DHS H3 Neo thanks !!!
    I should add it feels a little dead at lower speeds and during service, but a couple of layers of baby oil definitely helps to liven it up and increase feedback in these regards.

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    Fais, I am in a similar predicament as I'm currently on 38 on opting for 39 on provincial. Do you have thoughts on the 38?

    To the OP, my thoughts on the matter are as follows:
    Commercial is more tacky than grippy and provincial is more grippy than tacky. What I mean by this is the ball doesn't stick to your racket as much with prov. Don't get me wrong, prov is still a bit tacky out of the package but this quickly disappears over time.

    Provincial is also much easier to play with in my opinion because it comes in softer sponges and overall has better quality. In light of what I just mentioned, the prov comes across as faster. I remember playing with a 40 degrees commercial years ago and it felt like a slab of cement.

    I would say that the provincial outperforms the commercial in certain aspects of the game such as blocking but that could be more to do with sponge hardness opposed to the actual quality grade. I'm under the impression provincial is marginally lighter too but don't quote me on that.

    Perhaps it's an extremely powerful placebo but ever since I changed to the provincial I've never considered using anything else as a forehand rubber. I feel like part of the premium I pay is for peace of mind and perceived performance but to me it's worth it. I can recommend commercial if you're at a good fitness level and have great technique since you can generate your own power and extract more spin from the rubber. If you plan to boost, you probably won't be able to tell the difference between the two so commercial could also save you a few dollars there.

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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by otesan
    Is there any difference in DHS hurricane 3 neo and hurricane 3 neo provincial?
    H3 National over H3 Provincial over H3 for the masses! Even if the rubbers were physically identical, your mind would still make them different. Top-brand peanut butter tastes better, even if the jars come from the same production line and just received a different label.

    Not saying there's no difference; there are differences in sponge type (and different hardnesses), and there's factory boosting/tuning, there may be higher level of stringentness in QA, there may be a very real difference in logistics/shelf time.

    But there's always the placebo effect, as well as its counterpart, the nocebo effect. And these are strong effects, that still work even when aware there's just that. Silly things, people. Really.

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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by otesan
    oh thanks i found something - at the end of video there you can see provencial one is more curved. I think the only difference is booster used on provencial version.
    Nope. That is a reverse dome (where the sponge shrinks and the top sheet stretches). The regular dome on the h3 neo (after boosting, or in my case baby oil that has dried) looks like after the sponge has stretched

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    #10
    Both play pretty much the same. However i would suggest getting the provincial as it plays much better. The Performance Gap between National and Provincial is small compared to the difference in price.

    The provincials topsheet is tacky but less tacky than Commercial. This is good because the commercial is "Too Tacky" while the Provincial is just right. Tacky enough to impart alot of spin easily, but not enough to drasticly reduce the speed. The provincial is also grippier and is easier to loop with. However good technique can compensate for this plus point when using the commercial. Probably the biggest difference is the softness of the topsheet. The provincial on average seems softer and more controllable than the Commercial which is nice for me. Sponge hardness feels and play identical for both versions.

    Overall i would recommend getting Provincial>Commercial (Ignore National as its way too expensive for the minor increase in performance). However the price gap between Provincial and Commercial is justified

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    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by iamjason8
    Fais, I am in a similar predicament as I'm currently on 38 on opting for 39 on provincial. Do you have thoughts on the 38?

    To the OP, my thoughts on the matter are as follows:
    Commercial is more tacky than grippy and provincial is more grippy than tacky. What I mean by this is the ball doesn't stick to your racket as much with prov. Don't get me wrong, prov is still a bit tacky out of the package but this quickly disappears over time.

    Provincial is also much easier to play with in my opinion because it comes in softer sponges and overall has better quality. In light of what I just mentioned, the prov comes across as faster. I remember playing with a 40 degrees commercial years ago and it felt like a slab of cement.

    I would say that the provincial outperforms the commercial in certain aspects of the game such as blocking but that could be more to do with sponge hardness opposed to the actual quality grade. I'm under the impression provincial is marginally lighter too but don't quote me on that.

    Perhaps it's an extremely powerful placebo but ever since I changed to the provincial I've never considered using anything else as a forehand rubber. I feel like part of the premium I pay is for peace of mind and perceived performance but to me it's worth it. I can recommend commercial if you're at a good fitness level and have great technique since you can generate your own power and extract more spin from the rubber. If you plan to boost, you probably won't be able to tell the difference between the two so commercial could also save you a few dollars there.
    This is very informative to me. Part of why I haven't switched/tried provincial is because I feel I need to develop enough as a player before I decide to spoil myself. I really do covet this rubber.

    I've decided I am an H3 Neo fan for life. I've been incredibly happy with this rubber, and its durability astounds me. I have a 1+ year old H3N rubber which I boosted with baby oil and it still plays phenomenally. I also have a 4+ year old H3N that I did the same treatment and it holds up surprisingly well (still tacky, still lively).

    So you feel like the 38 degrees bottoms out at mid+ range or faster speeds? If the softer ones don't bottom out then I'm going to get a 39 degree H3N. When my touch is developed enough I will switch to a 40 degree, and finally a provincial




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    #12
    Quote Originally Posted by fais
    This is very informative to me. Part of why I haven't switched/tried provincial is because I feel I need to develop enough as a player before I decide to spoil myself. I really do covet this rubber.

    I've decided I am an H3 Neo fan for life. I've been incredibly happy with this rubber, and its durability astounds me. I have a 1+ year old H3N rubber which I boosted with baby oil and it still plays phenomenally. I also have a 4+ year old H3N that I did the same treatment and it holds up surprisingly well (still tacky, still lively).

    So you feel like the 38 degrees bottoms out at mid+ range or faster speeds? If the softer ones don't bottom out then I'm going to get a 39 degree H3N. When my touch is developed enough I will switch to a 40 degree, and finally a provincial
    I think it's ironic many players share that sentiment (to 'earn' the right to use it) because it's easier to play! Once you do decide to indulge yourself though, check out the blue sponge. It costs more but is said to feel harder but more powerful.I definitely admire your restraint. Heavens know I lack it.

    H3N is definitely a special rubber. I've played with H3N (and the classic before that) on my forehand for as long as I can remember. People place a lot of emphasis on the great loops but amateurs can substitute other rubbers for looping. It's the short game that really sets the rubber apart in my book!

    I do feel like it bottoms out a little which is strange to say for a Chinese rubber... I play it on a carbon blade too so sometimes I have to wonder if it's my technique...

    One thing I've never been able to find a solid answer to is how much of an impact one degree of difference makes i.e. how much difference can there actually be between 38/39 or 39/40.

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    #13
    Quote Originally Posted by iamjason8
    I think it's ironic many players share that sentiment (to 'earn' the right to use it) because it's easier to play! Once you do decide to indulge yourself though, check out the blue sponge. It costs more but is said to feel harder but more powerful.I definitely admire your restraint. Heavens know I lack it.

    H3N is definitely a special rubber. I've played with H3N (and the classic before that) on my forehand for as long as I can remember. People place a lot of emphasis on the great loops but amateurs can substitute other rubbers for looping. It's the short game that really sets the rubber apart in my book!

    I do feel like it bottoms out a little which is strange to say for a Chinese rubber... I play it on a carbon blade too so sometimes I have to wonder if it's my technique...

    One thing I've never been able to find a solid answer to is how much of an impact one degree of difference makes i.e. how much difference can there actually be between 38/39 or 39/40.
    +1

    I think 1° degree would still lie in the tolerance zone.

    Quote Originally Posted by fais
    Nope. That is a reverse dome (where the sponge shrinks and the top sheet stretches). The regular dome on the h3 neo (after boosting, or in my case baby oil that has dried) looks like after the sponge has stretched

    this




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    Fais what have you done? That sponge looks like it's at least 5mm

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    #14
    On average, I feel 40 degree has higher throw than 39 degree. I can't place why, but I always play better with 40 degree. It's why I won't use Nittaku H3 Neo anymore because it's only available in 39 degree.

    The same can be said between Tibhar Hybrid K1 vs K1 Plus. It's only a degree of difference in hardness, but I play entirely better with the K1 Plus. I have better control, and better spin.

    So I'm always confused when I read that softer rubber has better control. With softer rubber, I always feel like I'm flipping a coin with my shots.

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    #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Suga D
    +1
    Fais what have you done? That sponge looks like it's at least 5mm
    Hahaha no no no it looks worse than it is! The rubber has been cut for a penhold forehand, with an inch+ room between the handle and the base of the rubber. It's really not that fat! ...I think?

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    #16
    Quote Originally Posted by iamjason8
    I think it's ironic many players share that sentiment (to 'earn' the right to use it) because it's easier to play! Once you do decide to indulge yourself though, check out the blue sponge. It costs more but is said to feel harder but more powerful.I definitely admire your restraint. Heavens know I lack it.

    H3N is definitely a special rubber. I've played with H3N (and the classic before that) on my forehand for as long as I can remember. People place a lot of emphasis on the great loops but amateurs can substitute other rubbers for looping. It's the short game that really sets the rubber apart in my book!

    I do feel like it bottoms out a little which is strange to say for a Chinese rubber... I play it on a carbon blade too so sometimes I have to wonder if it's my technique...

    One thing I've never been able to find a solid answer to is how much of an impact one degree of difference makes i.e. how much difference can there actually be between 38/39 or 39/40.
    Wht you call a lack of restraint, I call a lack of money.

    I don't play at a very high level, so I don't run into the problem of bottoming out, but I can definitely see why it would (hence the existence of prov/nat versions of this rubber).

    Also, definitely agree in the short game analysis, I've somehow managed to pull drop shots on short serves that literally land within 5 inches of the net. But, you have to really develop a feel and touch (along with lots of practice) if you want to be consistent at it (which due to lack of practice I am not.)

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    Thanks for the feedback Suga D. I'll definitely give the 39 a go. Can't wait to slap it on, along with Rozena for when my Carbonado 145 arrives in the mail. I feel like a lot of people play C145 with H3N but they never specify the hardness. I feel like it stands to reason 39 would be the ideal pairing anyway since it's the most popular hardness among mortals.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jabugo
    On average, I feel 40 degree has higher throw than 39 degree. I can't place why, but I always play better with 40 degree. It's why I won't use Nittaku H3 Neo anymore because it's only available in 39 degree.

    The same can be said between Tibhar Hybrid K1 vs K1 Plus. It's only a degree of difference in hardness, but I play entirely better with the K1 Plus. I have better control, and better spin.

    So I'm always confused when I read that softer rubber has better control. With softer rubber, I always feel like I'm flipping a coin with my shots.
    I always thought the Nittaku H3N was around 37 degrees because it feels softer than both my 38's.

    In many ways I do agree with your comment about the notion of 'soft rubber = more control' being confusing. I think the reasoning is they are safer and easier to control on flat and top spin shots. When it comes to more sophisticated aspects of the game like a delicate short game (pushes, banana flip) they fall short. I personally don't like soft rubbers on bh for this very reason.

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    #18
    Quote Originally Posted by iamjason8
    In many ways I do agree with your comment about the notion of 'soft rubber = more control' being confusing. I think the reasoning is they are safer and easier to control on flat and top spin shots. When it comes to more sophisticated aspects of the game like a delicate short game (pushes, banana flip) they fall short. I personally don't like soft rubbers on bh for this very reason.
    This is exactly why I like the FX-S on my backhand. With its medium-soft sponge of 42,5(?) degrees it provides a lot of safety and forgiveness, while at the same time its stiff and firm top sheet makes the rubber feel crisp and direct. However on soft attacking shots it still works because the top sheet is very grippy. It's an amazing combination!

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    #19
    Does anybody know if the provincial version has a better glue layer between sponge and topsheet? The topsheet on every commercial version I had ended up coming off the sponge on the edge and I'm not sure if I'm allowed to play with that.

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    #20
    Quote Originally Posted by loerting
    Does anybody know if the provincial version has a better glue layer between sponge and topsheet? The topsheet on every commercial version I had ended up coming off the sponge on the edge and I'm not sure if I'm allowed to play with that.

    Their glue is the same.


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