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    1. Top | #41
      ajtatosmano2 is offline
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      Quote Originally Posted by Lightzy View Post
      I do )

      It's the same for mastering any activity. At first you have to put a lot of thought into the tiny annoying things (for piano for example, with what order of fingers to play a certain passage), and then it becomes so natural that you never even have to think about it, and even if it's something you never played before, still your fingers will find the most natural fluid way to play it without you having to be conscious of it.
      But that never happens if you don't spend a lot of time consciously, slowly, arranging your fingering on many passages beforehand. And again, with amateurs who never become pros, it is the same problem. Their technique is always slurred and stunted because of what I think is a lack of conscious, mindful effort.

      The sad thing is that things only becomes hugely fun after you've done the hard conscious, technical work, because after you can 'forget' that, your mind is now free to concentrate on the actual music and creativity. So most people who play piano, excuse me for saying, don't even know how fun playing piano can be.

      I figure it's the same with TT.
      You can see how, if you're at a stage where you're just trying to put the ball on the table with some quality in a match, you're not yet at a level where your mind can be freed to really think about ball placement for example, and the game has no real art to it yet. After that it becomes even more fun than you can imagine!


      Sorry for the longass post.
      I play the piano as an amateur. I don't have enough time to practice, as I spend most of my time away from a piano (2 or 3 times per week maximum). It's a pain that I can't play freely because my technique isn't good enough. I am better in TT, but my technical limitations are still there. Nothing is more annoying than unforced errors not letting you play the game you like (and I am not necessarily speaking about all out attack).

      BTW, Lightzy, do you have any tips on piano pieces which are good for building a solid foundation and good for a starting repertoire? Like Für Elise (I know it's mainstream but I learnt a lot from it), that level is comfortable. Continue in private message if you can help

    2. Top | #42
      Lightzy is offline
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      Quote Originally Posted by ajtatosmano2 View Post
      I play the piano as an amateur. I don't have enough time to practice, as I spend most of my time away from a piano (2 or 3 times per week maximum). It's a pain that I can't play freely because my technique isn't good enough. I am better in TT, but my technical limitations are still there. Nothing is more annoying than unforced errors not letting you play the game you like (and I am not necessarily speaking about all out attack).

      BTW, Lightzy, do you have any tips on piano pieces which are good for building a solid foundation and good for a starting repertoire? Like Für Elise (I know it's mainstream but I learnt a lot from it), that level is comfortable. Continue in private message if you can help
      Sure.
      Bach's Prelude in C and Chopin's Prelude in E- are probably the two classical pieces I would most recommend to start with, but you do need to be able to read notes passably+ for the second one as there are some confusing bits in the notation.

      But really, the good musicians are those who simply love music enough to listen to some music and then say "I HAVE to play that", and then play it again and sit by the piano and learn it by ear, and then say "but I'd like it better if it sounded a bit like this..." and then change it according to what you feel.
      If there's music you really love, simple songs, not complex classical music necessarily, try to find it on the piano by ear.
      You don't need set 'practice time', you just need to sit one time and take however long it takes you in that one sitting to learn a song, or a portion of classical music you want to learn. Set a goal and sit and finish the job, otherwise it's more likely to never finish it

      I
      Last edited by Lightzy; 5 Days Ago at 08:20 PM.

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      ajtatosmano2 (4 Days Ago)

    4. Top | #43
      ajtatosmano2 is offline
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      Quote Originally Posted by Lightzy View Post
      Sure.
      Bach's Prelude in C and Chopin's Prelude in E- are probably the two classical pieces I would most recommend to start with, but you do need to be able to read notes passably+ for the second one as there are some confusing bits in the notation.

      But really, the good musicians are those who simply love music enough to listen to some music and then say "I HAVE to play that", and then play it again and sit by the piano and learn it by ear, and then say "but I'd like it better if it sounded a bit like this..." and then change it according to what you feel.
      If there's music you really love, simple songs, not complex classical music necessarily, try to find it on the piano by ear.
      You don't need set 'practice time', you just need to sit one time and take however long it takes you in that one sitting to learn a song, or a portion of classical music you want to learn. Set a goal and sit and finish the job, otherwise it's more likely to never finish it

      I
      Thank you! I realized I played the Chopin prelude in the past. It's one of my favourite pieces, if not the favourite, so I will dig up the score. And yesterday I learned to play the Bach (fortunately I found the Well-tempered Clavier book at home). I haven't memorized yet, so it's not stable yet, because I can't sight-read.

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