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  1. VenusCarboKev is offline
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    #1

    Can anyone give me some tips?

    well i was watching this video and i noticed his transition from his BH to FH and vice versa is super smooth....how would one learn that? do i just keep doing 1 fh 1 bh over and over again? and when versing someone who just blocks everything....and attacks when they get the chance....how could you beat them? i mean they are way more consistent and accurate...and they are so relaxed just standing close to the table... they just do placement wide fh then wide bh and here i am running around doing topspins and im the one losing...how could u beat them?

    THanks!

  2. Mr. RicharD is offline
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    #2
    Hey VenusCarboKev this is just a drill that Brian Pace introduces. He's a great coach and is just showing some necessary skills to learn before one can advance in level. Basically his system allows a player to start from scratch and learn enough about Table Tennis to train and get to their next level whichever it may be. If you are playing someone who is blocking and sending you all over the place then you are not putting enough on the ball nor are you placing the ball well. I would have to see more video of you playing this particular person, but if you're anything like how I first started out then you're really confused at how they can block the ball all over the place when you should really be worrying about how to get them to move all over the place. When you return their balls try to go wide to their BH or FH and get them to move around. It sounds like they like to stay in one spot, but you aren't moving them out of their comfort zone. They are moving you out of yours which allows them ample time to set up for their next shot. Try pushing the ball short to their FH or BH and move them in and out until you can get a gist of what they're uncomfortable with. Typically someone who likes to stay close to the table and only blocks means they have poor footwork. So drop the ball short to their wide forehand and make them reach in this will probably mean they give you an easy high ball and that's when you topspin it to their BH or FH which ever is more open this sends them on the run and makes you the one standing close to the table while they are lunging for the ball.

    Hope this helps. As I said before I would need to see a game via video to really critique how to play a particular person, but if you want to improve your footwork in general or learn some good foundation principles then Brian's videos are great to watch and practice with. I recommend downloading by purchase ( I believe it's $40.00 USD) his Textbook Table Tennis video. It's great for learning more drills and checking out his system.

  3. yurybarquero is offline
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    #3
    for the smooth part this video might help you but it´s mainly practice what you need



    and to beat a blocker you can check this link and download the Pdf and you can also vary the spin and speed as well as a smash...
    http://www.larrytt.com/ttsts/Step%20...%20Tactics.pdf

  4. azlan is offline
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    #4
    Her's how to do it

    To improve, we must enjoy the game and above all have fun



  5. Matt Hetherington is offline
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    #5
    The smoothness comes from recovering after every shot to be ready for the next one. Start with one backhand one forehand, build up anticipation and practice the changing between the shots under pressure. You can move on to 1 or 2 balls to each side, then I like doing 3-5 backhands then a switch to the forehand then back to backhand. But essentially yes practice makes closer to perfect :P
    Pro Table Tennis Coaching Blog at - MHTableTennis

  6. VenusCarboKev is offline
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. RicharD
    Hey VenusCarboKev this is just a drill that Brian Pace introduces. He's a great coach and is just showing some necessary skills to learn before one can advance in level. Basically his system allows a player to start from scratch and learn enough about Table Tennis to train and get to their next level whichever it may be. If you are playing someone who is blocking and sending you all over the place then you are not putting enough on the ball nor are you placing the ball well. I would have to see more video of you playing this particular person, but if you're anything like how I first started out then you're really confused at how they can block the ball all over the place when you should really be worrying about how to get them to move all over the place. When you return their balls try to go wide to their BH or FH and get them to move around. It sounds like they like to stay in one spot, but you aren't moving them out of their comfort zone. They are moving you out of yours which allows them ample time to set up for their next shot. Try pushing the ball short to their FH or BH and move them in and out until you can get a gist of what they're uncomfortable with. Typically someone who likes to stay close to the table and only blocks means they have poor footwork. So drop the ball short to their wide forehand and make them reach in this will probably mean they give you an easy high ball and that's when you topspin it to their BH or FH which ever is more open this sends them on the run and makes you the one standing close to the table while they are lunging for the ball.

    Hope this helps. As I said before I would need to see a game via video to really critique how to play a particular person, but if you want to improve your footwork in general or learn some good foundation principles then Brian's videos are great to watch and practice with. I recommend downloading by purchase ( I believe it's $40.00 USD) his Textbook Table Tennis video. It's great for learning more drills and checking out his system.

    thanks for the explanation and everything! yes your right im talking about my dad and yes he doesnt have much footwork....and okay i will take a vid next time we play..maybe in a day or two..

  7. VenusCarboKev is offline
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    #7
    [QUOTE=azlan;34753]Her's how to do it


    haha hes no match for fang bo! well...fang bo is really good afterall he almost beat timo boll xD

  8. VenusCarboKev is offline
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by PingPongPom
    The smoothness comes from recovering after every shot to be ready for the next one. Start with one backhand one forehand, build up anticipation and practice the changing between the shots under pressure. You can move on to 1 or 2 balls to each side, then I like doing 3-5 backhands then a switch to the forehand then back to backhand. But essentially yes practice makes closer to perfect :P
    ok ill try that thanks

  9. JustAlt is offline
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    #9
    [QUOTE=VenusCarboKev;34918]
    Quote Originally Posted by azlan
    Her's how to do it


    haha hes no match for fang bo! well...fang bo is really good afterall he almost beat timo boll xD
    He did beat boll in the Chinese super league semifinals.

  10. UpSideDownCarl is offline
    says I like to hit Heavy Topspin
     
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    #10
    [QUOTE=JustAlt;34924]
    Quote Originally Posted by VenusCarboKev

    He did beat boll in the Chinese super league semifinals.
    Yup. Fang Bo gave Timo Boll 3-0. And against Brian Pace it looks like he can goof around.
    Setup 1: Blade by Nate: Vortex Spin Machine, FH Evolution MX-K, BH Evolution FX-P
    Setup 2: OSP Virtuoso Plus, FH Rasanter R 48, BH Rasanter R 48
    Spin is Everything

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    #11
    I feel like if your BH and FH are on a certain level already, the transition will be pretty natural. I wouldn't make it a main point to focus on the transition itself. If you are getting thrown around easily by your opponent blocking your loops to places you have a hard time continuing to attack strongly, I would suggest thinking about the placement of your first loop. If your opponent seems to be able to block the ball to places that make you have to run a lot, maybe he already kind of knows where your attack will be and is familiar with your amount of spin. Figure out where he is waiting for your opening loops and avoid looping there (you still have to sometimes as part of variation). You will find that when your loops aren't going to where he is expecting, the quality of his blocks will drop dramatically and you can maybe fight for more control over the course of your points with him. If the majority of your shots go middle or cross table like most people, try throwing in more shots down the line.

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