Back to Forum
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 31 of 31
  1. ProgramCrazy is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    TTD Member 0 9
    P
    ProgramCrazy is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    TTD Member 9 0

    User Info Menu


    Mar 2022
    United States
    9
    0
    0
    Read 0 Reviews
    #21
    Quote Originally Posted by DukeGaGa
    I use Joola Varnish as well, and I notice the grains lifting up on my blades too, though not as bad. I usually sand it down a bit with 1500 grit sandpaper wrapped on something that's flat. But now I think I'll follow @hipnotic's advice and use 180+240 in the future.

    When you used the Joola Varnish, did you spread it over the entire blade face to become wet (Like how this guy did in his thumbnail)? Or did you just dip the brush in once or twice and just spread it over the blade face?


  2. DukeGaGa is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Advanced TTD Member 174 390
    DukeGaGa's Avatar
    DukeGaGa is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Advanced TTD Member 390 174
    #22
    Quote Originally Posted by ProgramCrazy

    When you used the Joola Varnish, did you spread it over the entire blade face to become wet (Like how this guy did in his thumbnail)? Or did you just dip the brush in once or twice and just spread it over the blade face?

    Neither, I put a few drops on a piece of sponge, the same for spreading water based glue, then spread it on the blade. Sometimes I also just put the drops on the blade then spread it like it's glue. I use sponges because it absorbs the excess varnish, but not too much like paper towels.


  3. JRW911 is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    TTD Member 7 44
    J
    JRW911 is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    TTD Member 44 7

    User Info Menu


    Dec 2021
    United States
    44
    7
    0
    Read 0 Reviews
    #23
    Quote Originally Posted by hipnotic
    It's called raising the grain and it's a common wood working practice, not just in blade building. If this were done before, he could have applied any kind of finishing without any problems. The point is that, those fibers that were raised, were already loose, so you really want to get rid of them. In this specific case, if he had used a poly finish he wouldn't have had any raised fibers, but the first time he used a water based glue they would all come attached to the rubber, or worse. Unless he used a considerable amount of sealer, but in that case he would have changed the properties of the blade. People really overestimate the amount of effort it takes to sand through a top ply...

    Sent from my MAR-LX1A using Tapatalk

    I've purchased about 8 or 9 different blades in the last 6 months or so (various brand and top ply materials) and have sealed every one of them with Minwax polyurethane. Almost every single one of them have had their rubbers removed and different ones applied on several occasions as I like to test out different blade/rubber combos. All this while only using WBG. Not only have I never had to sand any of them after sealing them, I've never had any of them splinter when removing the rubbers. Every single one of my blades still look brand new and have never seen sandpaper. One or two very thin layers of polyurethane while immediately wiping away any excess with a paper towel. Zero sandpaper needed. Playability has been affected 0%.
    You guys can stick with your water based varnishes if you feel the need. Just don't forget to visit the sandpaper aisle when you buy your next can!


  4. lodro is offline
    says TT-CLOWN, old git
     
    Senior TTD Member 363 991
    L
    lodro is offline
    says TT-CLOWN, old git
     
    Senior TTD Member 991 363

    User Info Menu

    #24
    Quote Originally Posted by JRW911

    I've purchased about 8 or 9 different blades in the last 6 months or so (various brand and top ply materials) and have sealed every one of them with Minwax polyurethane. Almost every single one of them have had their rubbers removed and different ones applied on several occasions as I like to test out different blade/rubber combos. All this while only using WBG. Not only have I never had to sand any of them after sealing them, I've never had any of them splinter when removing the rubbers. Every single one of my blades still look brand new and have never seen sandpaper. One or two very thin layers of polyurethane while immediately wiping away any excess with a paper towel. Zero sandpaper needed. Playability has been affected 0%.
    You guys can stick with your water based varnishes if you feel the need. Just don't forget to visit the sandpaper aisle when you buy your next can!

    fair enough.
    But this is not a post and discussion about glues and varnishes and their chemical components, this is about a single incident where things have gone wrong. And i think it is a matter of the kind of wood that is being used.


  5. hipnotic is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Elite TTD Member 1,466 1,067
    hipnotic's Avatar
    hipnotic is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Elite TTD Member 1,067 1,466

    User Info Menu


    Dec 2011
    Portugal
    1,067
    1,466
    2321
    Read 0 Reviews
    #25
    Quote Originally Posted by JRW911

    I've purchased about 8 or 9 different blades in the last 6 months or so (various brand and top ply materials) and have sealed every one of them with Minwax polyurethane. Almost every single one of them have had their rubbers removed and different ones applied on several occasions as I like to test out different blade/rubber combos. All this while only using WBG. Not only have I never had to sand any of them after sealing them, I've never had any of them splinter when removing the rubbers. Every single one of my blades still look brand new and have never seen sandpaper. One or two very thin layers of polyurethane while immediately wiping away any excess with a paper towel. Zero sandpaper needed. Playability has been affected 0%.
    You guys can stick with your water based varnishes if you feel the need. Just don't forget to visit the sandpaper aisle when you buy your next can!

    What you failed to realize was that I was talking about this specific case, and how this top layer reacted to being exposed to water, the sealer is irrelevant.

    Congrats on your 8 or 9 blades, I have made and sealed over 450 blades.

    The Following 2 Users Like hipnotic's Post:

    lodro and PingBirdPong

    www.sdcttblades.com / Insta: @sdc_tt_blades / Face: @SDCblades

  6. haggisv is offline
    says must try everything :)
     
    Established TTD Member 76 102
    haggisv's Avatar
    haggisv is offline
    says must try everything :)
     
    Established TTD Member 102 76
    #26
    The DHS 301 blade has a very porous outer ply, so water (from the sealer) soaks in more easily compared to most other blades.

    I've not used the Joola sealer before though. I often use the sealer from Donic/Tibhar/Xiom, which are all the same and have the little sponge on the top of the bottle. I think using a sponge as the applicator (compared to brush) puts a lot less sealer (and thus water) onto the surface, so the fibres don't raise so much.

    If I get raised fibres on a blade after sealing using this sealer, a quick few wipes with 300grit paper removes it very easily and quickly, producing a perfectly smooth surface.
    Last edited by haggisv; 4 Weeks Ago at 05:25 AM. Reason: spelling

  7. mocker88 is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Advanced TTD Member 113 340
    mocker88's Avatar
    mocker88 is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Advanced TTD Member 340 113
    #27
    I use the water based TT Revolution No.3 sealer. 8-10 drops and then smooth it out with the attached sponges. This must be much better than a brush to get the layer(s) even.

  8. Way Zooted is offline
    says https://sunrisetabletennis.com
     
    TTD Member 12 24
    Way Zooted's Avatar
    Way Zooted is offline
    says https://sunrisetabletennis.com
     
    TTD Member 24 12

    User Info Menu


    Oct 2016
    United States
    24
    12
    76
    Read 0 Reviews
    #28
    My preference is spray lacquer. I prefer Deft satin but Watco or Minwax satin/matte also works. I use a sponge for the edges and only 1-3 very light coats on the face. Sanding sealers are also good.

    Also, something I didn't know until recently is there are different sandpaper grit grading systems around the world. CAMI (N America) and FEPA (Europe) are the two most common.


    The Following User Likes Way Zooted's Post:

    DukeGaGa

    Last edited by Way Zooted; 3 Days Ago at 03:59 PM.

  9. DukeGaGa is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Advanced TTD Member 174 390
    DukeGaGa's Avatar
    DukeGaGa is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Advanced TTD Member 390 174
    #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Way Zooted
    My preference is spray lacquer. I prefer Deft satin but Watco or Minwax satin/matte also works. I use a sponge for the edges and only 1-3 very light coats on the face. Sanding sealers are also good.

    Also, something I didn't know until recently is there are different sandpaper grit grading systems around the world. CAMI (N America) and FEPA (Europe) are the two most common.

    Nice chart, looks like the sandpaper I bought were all FEPA standard since they all got the P in front of the number, but they're dirt cheap on amazon and works pretty well, so I can't complain.

    The Following User Likes DukeGaGa's Post:

    Way Zooted


  10. PingBirdPong is offline
    says Verified Cheater, Banned by ITTF :)
     
    Advanced TTD Member 228 361
    PingBirdPong's Avatar
    PingBirdPong is offline
    says Verified Cheater, Banned by ITTF :)
     
    Advanced TTD Member 361 228
    #30
    About varnishing…
    I see my equipment retailer use water based varnish(DHS specifically), but they brush it on the blade lightly with the original brush, but immediately wipe most of it off with a paper towel. The amount that soaks into the wood is enough to seal the blade, and need no sanding.
    Modestly, Leo

  11. DukeGaGa is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Advanced TTD Member 174 390
    DukeGaGa's Avatar
    DukeGaGa is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Advanced TTD Member 390 174
    #31
    Quote Originally Posted by PingBirdPong
    About varnishing…
    I see my equipment retailer use water based varnish(DHS specifically), but they brush it on the blade lightly with the original brush, but immediately wipe most of it off with a paper towel. The amount that soaks into the wood is enough to seal the blade, and need no sanding.

    Yeah, I don’t sand after sealing the surface either, I only polish the edge after sealing to make sure the edge tape don’t pull off splinters. I don’t wipe with paper towel however since I use a foam brush to apply the varnish, and the layer is so thin it’s already dry on the first side when I finish applying it on the other side lol

    The Following User Likes DukeGaGa's Post:

    PingBirdPong


Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Create a new Topic:
Title is required.