Better training with music

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A 2010 study led by sport psychologist C.I. Karageorghis states that the effects of music can lead to “higher-than-expected levels of endurance, power, productivity, or strength.” Do you think this applies to table tennis too, or would it harm the concentration and only distract?
 
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Depends on the music . In my opinion it would not be a good idea to listen to blues, jazz, classical or any vocal music since our mind automatically will get involved and take the focus off the game. I wouldn't mind listenig to some sort of house, trance or even techno. Anything with a steady rhythm is ok for me, but that's me..🤪
 
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Depends on the music . In my opinion it would not be a good idea to listen to blues, jazz, classical or any vocal music since our mind automatically will get involved and take the focus off the game. I wouldn't mind listenig to some sort of house, trance or even techno. Anything with a steady rhythm is ok for me, but that's me..🤪

Completely wrong since you're supposed to be a musician: if you listen carefully to guys training their FH or BH drive, it's pretty obvious that it's a shuffle rhythm, if you transcribe it on a sheet it's easy to write it with triplets:
1 2 3 | 1 2 3 | 1 2 3 | 1 2 3 |
racket hits the ball on 1st triplet, ball crosses the net on the 2nd, rebounds on opp side on 3rd triplet just before opp racket's hits it in return, typical shuffle, so basically it's WAY BETTER to use any shuffle blues or swing jazz to mimic FH and BH drives motions


Top spins on blocks are more in the straight 4 sixteenth notes pattern of course, but funky over 2 bars, here's a short snipet of what I've composed for my club's official music last year, based on a Kreanga's video training his BH top spins:
the video I've been influenced by:
And the music I did
https://soundcloud.com/joachim-mahoudeaux/da-fonkey-pp

For ghost practice/footwork patterns at home, I've set up various playlists:
FH/BH drives: swing jazz and shuffle blues from slow to medium to fast
- I'm Talking To You (Lucky Peterson)
- Bag's Groove - take 1 (Miles Davis)
- But Not For Me - take 2 (Miles Davis)
- Tenor Madness (Sonny Rollins) this one is really really fast to enhance the cardio.

Of course DON'T USE some Charlie Parker's version of Donna Lee or John Coltrane's Ginat Steps or Countdown for example, way too much uptempo tunes.

For FH/BH topspins, from slow to fast:
- some Prince's tunes: Controversy, Let's Work + Comparsa Tunina (Groove Collective) all in the 120-124 BPM zone
- then I switch over Prince's Do It All Night at 132 BPM
- and finally the UK band known to have worked with Jamiroquai, The Haggis Horns with Keep On dancing, very fast at 141 BPM

Then I use some kind of afro-cuban 6/8 rhythms as combos for short game or flicks: 2 steps forward to the net then 2 jumps backward to the ready position, sometimes followed by a top spin:
- 6 for Fred (Groove Collective)
- Six for Kim (Ray Mantilla Space Station)



 
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@OldUser

👍Yeah. I can't agree more about your rhythm observations, but me been a musician I tend to listen and automatically analyse solos, phrasing, scales to a level which totally hacks my mind set, so anything like jazz, rhythm and blues(shuffle or not), salsa, swing etc is no go for me during practice. Simply can't concentrate on TT
 
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