Do you counterloop your opponents opening loop?

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During a game when my opponent open loops against me, I typically block it back with BH and FH.

I've practiced counterlooping my opponent's opening loop in practice, and I can hit them fairly well in a practice scenario. But I never feel confident enough to attempt it in a game scenario.

Do you often use the counterloop in game? How do you get confidence to go for this shot instead of just blocking? Do you try to hit this shot always, or do you reserve if for the opponent's slower/higher loops?
 
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says ESN 42 hardness is my magic number
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Couter looping is an advance skill set that is wonderful to acquire and built on. If a player who can counter loop consistently, he will surely move up a notch or two. Regular players or hobby players are quite happy to be able to block looping back consistently.

I am in the opinion, counter looping is a skill set that you need a coach to assist you, it is not easy to learn on one's own effort. at least in my own experience.
 

Brs

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Brs

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I counter topspin diagonal forehand loops to my forehand now by default. Switching from reflex blocking to countering was simple but not easy. I trained close to table fh - fh topspin rallies with my coach three times a week for a year. At first I would do it maybe once in a match and block the rest. After a while it became more and more natural.

A couple things I learned from this. Equipment matters a lot. I was using chinese rubber for a while, battle 2 and H8. The sponges make counter-topspin stupidly easy compared to T05 or similar. Now I use Rozena fh and it works fine, but easier to learn with chinese rubber imo.

Speaking only of close to the table counters, it is way more consistent if you don't let your arm get out of line with your body. I mean, they rotate together. Kind of the opposite of the whip motion you would use to loop vs push or block. With incoming topspin you don't really need whip, the ball already has a lot of energy. And the timing is tricky bc it will kick at you, so more reliable to time with body rotation. For me anyway, YMMV.

Bottom line is if you wait to feel confident you will never start. In matches expect to miss 70% at first and just deal with it. That won't last long.
 
Michael, i play on national tournaments, on U19 and U21. Sometimes (mostly) if i not counterattack a ball who comes in my forehand i will receive a 140km/h forehand straight to the table and my face :)

I practice on group so is common on our practices if the ball comes into forehand, we will counterattack, loop, or topspin, even if we miss. We reached this level of practice regular forehand counter attack in much situations. To play in national level we are forced to do this, not block on forehand, all of us play an agressive forehand. Obviously have some cases you are forced to block but for us is rare, if we are in practice mostly of us will try to counter attack. Myself as a penholder more than some of my team mates. I try to counter attack every ball on my forehand.

We practice everyday sometimes more of 5 hours and still is not easy to counter attack, i think is the most difficult aspect of table tennis at the moment i am writing.

Counter attack or not really depends much of your level. Because if you watch carefully some professional videos or strong national players for example, you will see they open backspin balls 90% of the time on the opponents backhand and attack on backhand too, because is common professionals and strong national players have a monster forehand counter attack so if they open the third ball in backhand, they will receive a bomb.

But now in my reality, if i not develop a strong fh counter attack who works in 80% of situations, i will not reach my goals and develop my level.
 
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Michael, i play on national tournaments, on U19 and U21. Sometimes (mostly) if i not counterattack a ball who comes in my forehand i will receive a 140km/h forehand straight to the table and my face :)

I practice on group so is common on our practices if the ball comes into forehand, we will counterattack, loop, or topspin, even if we miss. We reached this level of practice regular forehand counter attack in much situations. To play in national level we are forced to do this, not block on forehand, all of us play an agressive forehand. Obviously have some cases you are forced to block but for us is rare, if we are in practice mostly of us will try to counter attack. Myself as a penholder more than some of my team mates. I try to counter attack every ball on my forehand.

We practice everyday sometimes more of 5 hours and still is not easy to counter attack, i think is the most difficult aspect of table tennis at the moment i am writing.

Counter attack or not really depends much of your level. Because if you watch carefully some professional videos or strong national players for example, you will see they open backspin balls 90% of the time on the opponents backhand and attack on backhand too, because is common professionals and strong national players have a monster forehand counter attack so if they open the third ball in backhand, they will receive a bomb.

But now in my reality, if i not develop a strong fh counter attack who works in 80% of situations, i will not reach my goals and develop my level.

This - when you play at a level where not doing the right thing almost always loses the point outright, you learn to do it, find another way to win points or you stop playing at that level.

 
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Well I started doing more counter-loops in game and experimenting with this technique. I'm not sure if I'm on the right path, or if blocking is the higher % play.

During a game today, opponent looped to my forehand and I blocked it long. I thought to myself "this is exactly the type of loop I should be counter looping". So the next couple of times opponent looped to my FH I went for the counter-loop and hit winners off them.

I guess so experimenting is needed to find the right balance between blocking and counter-looping.
 
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Well I started doing more counter-loops in game and experimenting with this technique. I'm not sure if I'm on the right path, or if blocking is the higher % play.

During a game today, opponent looped to my forehand and I blocked it long. I thought to myself "this is exactly the type of loop I should be counter looping". So the next couple of times opponent looped to my FH I went for the counter-loop and hit winners off them.

I guess so experimenting is needed to find the right balance between blocking and counter-looping.

Yes, learn more techniques but just stick to your prefer playing style as you feel comfortable. Table tennis reflects our personalities after all.

 
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