Easy-To-Use Tensor Rubbers

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Hello everyone !

I'm looking for the best "Easy-To-Use" Tensor rubbers.
Whether it's for a beginner player, a young player in progress or simply to better control a transition to the carbon blade, these are relatively inexpensive rubbers, with good control and effective. These are Euro / Jap rubbers with a very light Tensor feel.

Here is a list of those that I know, do not hesitate to give me your reviews, your comparisons and to suggest other models. Attention, it must necessarily be products easily accessible and intended for the general public:

- Xiom Vega Intro (47.5°)
- Nittaku Factive (45°)
- Stiga DNA Future M (47.5°)
- Joola Rhyzen CMD (45°)
- Joola Rhyzen Fire (45°)
- Joola Rhyzen Ice (40°)
- Victas VJ>O7 Regular (42.5°)
- Victas VJ>O7 Stiff (45°)
- Victas VJ>O7 Limber (40°)
- Victas Ventus Regular (42.5°)
- Donic Desto F4 (40°)
- Andro GTT 40 (40°)
- Andro GTT 45 (45°)
- Andro Good ? (45°)
 
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I think Rakza 7 is very popular and quite easy to use. Rubber feels soft and has high arc and easy to create spin.

It's totally true, I agree and I use it myself. But we can't consider it as an "Easy-to-Use". It has a speed far superior to all the models on the list and remains quite dynamic. It is a fast but very complete and versatile modern rubber. I can't put it on the list unfortunately.

 
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It's totally true, I agree and I use it myself. But we can't consider it as an "Easy-to-Use". It has a speed far superior to all the models on the list and remains quite dynamic. It is a fast but very complete and versatile modern rubber. I can't put it on the list unfortunately.

Ok that's fair. Did you also test the Victas 07 stiff? I tested it, and I feel its also quite dynamic and feels much harder than 45 degree. I would have thought it is 50 degree. I don't think it is easy to use, I actually find it more demanding rubber.

 
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Ok that's fair. Did you also test the Victas 07 stiff? I tested it, and I feel its also quite dynamic and feels much harder than 45 degree. I would have thought it is 50 degree. I don't think it is easy to use, I actually find it more demanding rubber.

I'm just going to have the opportunity to test one next week. But this is the first time I've been told that about this rubber. Is it just harder than expected or also faster?

 
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Andro R37 and R42 and Stiga DNA Pro S, not cheap but really easy to use on ALL+ blades, the Rasanter rubbers are also available in 1.7mm thickness, that helps a lot for beginners development...
 
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Hello everyone !

I'm looking for the best "Easy-To-Use" Tensor rubbers.
Whether it's for a beginner player, a young player in progress or simply to better control a transition to the carbon blade, these are relatively inexpensive rubbers, with good control and effective. These are Euro / Jap rubbers with a very light Tensor feel.

Here is a list of those that I know, do not hesitate to give me your reviews, your comparisons and to suggest other models. Attention, it must necessarily be products easily accessible and intended for the general public:

- Xiom Vega Intro (47.5°)
- Nittaku Factive (45°)
- Stiga DNA Future M (47.5°)
- Joola Rhyzen CMD (45°)
- Joola Rhyzen Fire (45°)
- Joola Rhyzen Ice (40°)
- Victas VJ>O7 Regular (42.5°)
- Victas VJ>O7 Stiff (45°)
- Victas VJ>O7 Limber (40°)
- Victas Ventus Regular (42.5°)
- Donic Desto F4 (40°)
- Andro GTT 40 (40°)
- Andro GTT 45 (45°)
- Andro Good ? (45°)
Hi, dear
How can you tell between tensor and non-tensor ?


 
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You only offer Tensors that are not too fast (except the Rakza Z which is a hybrid so... out of context) so I conclude that the list may already be complete.

Out of curiosity, what does an R42 on a carbon blade like Viscaria look like?

Like putting Fiat 500 wheels and tyres on a Bugatti Veyron: why choosing an hypercar with wrong tyres when the youngster still got a red L sticker (red A for us french people) at the back ? Viscaria and all those OFF, OFF+ blades are meant to be used with fast rubbers, either inverted or pips out, or at least boosted chinese sticky rubbers.

The R37 and R42 are awesome for D2 to R3 youngsters that use all wood ALL+/OFF- blades, or something not faster than the Donic Waldner Senso Carbon (around the 1250Hz mark), I know 2 cadets at my club that uses them on Waldner all wood Senso V1 blades, both play in D1 to R3 leagues with a kind of 1200 FFTT rating (equal to RC/US 1700). They love that setup and they do really well with it, they're training since 4 years now, they began TT at 10.

 
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Here is a list of those that I know, do not hesitate to give me your reviews, your comparisons and to suggest other models.
I agree with your list in general, give or take a fewThere is however one line of disctinction that I would like to draw.Some of these rubbers have been introduced specifically for a certain target group.They come with reduced "speed glue/Tensor/whatever" effect and are meant to allow the next step onwards from classic rubbers still often recommended for beginners. Whether it makes any sense in the 2022 plastic world to let anyone begin with a 1969 rubber like Sriver is a different question, but for those who answer "no" or want to move on, there are these rubbers like theXIOM Vega Intro, Victas Ventus Regular, Stiga Future M.Especially with the Intro and the Victas they offer modern technology at a price below of those for "classic" rubbers like Coppa, Vario and countless others.Some of the others rubbers listed may also be fairly easy to use, but more as a by-product or side effect, And I think the ones mentioned as specific "beginner tensors" sit right between classic rubbers and softer/slower "regular" tensors in terms of speed and catapult, yet offer good spin potential.In the end, it all makes little difference.I would add ANDRO Hexer DURO to the list, also not a specific beginners rubber, but does a good job at a fair price.High performance rubbers as Rasanter are out for me, even if you take the soft version and thin sponges. It´s just a different concept, and I would consider those the next step.
 
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Like putting Fiat 500 wheels and tyres on a Bugatti Veyron: why choosing an hypercar with wrong tyres when the youngster still got a red L sticker (red A for us french people) at the back ? Viscaria and all those OFF, OFF+ blades are meant to be used with fast rubbers, either inverted or pips out, or at least boosted chinese sticky rubbers.

The R37 and R42 are awesome for D2 to R3 youngsters that use all wood ALL+/OFF- blades, or something not faster than the Donic Waldner Senso Carbon (around the 1250Hz mark), I know 2 cadets at my club that uses them on Waldner all wood Senso V1 blades, both play in D1 to R3 leagues with a kind of 1200 FFTT rating (equal to RC/US 1700). They love that setup and they do really well with it, they're training since 4 years now, they began TT at 10.

You have certainly noticed that we are putting carbon blade in the hands of young players earlier and earlier. They don't know the difference and adapt quickly so give them what they will use at their maximum level.
On the other hand, the choice of rubbers is scalable with progression. It is in that spirit that I posed this question.

I myself have just switched to a viscaria-like blade and for a healthier transition I considered these "Easy-to-use" overlays. I have among my friends a 1800 (FFTT) player who plays with Bluestorm Z3 (42,5°) and the other 1500 (FFTT) with soft V>03 like R37... So it's still usable after all.

 
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You have certainly noticed that we are putting carbon blade in the hands of young players earlier and earlier. They don't know the difference and adapt quickly so give them what they will use at their maximum level.
On the other hand, the choice of rubbers is scalable with progression. It is in that spirit that I posed this question.

I myself have just switched to a viscaria-like wood and for a healthier transition I considered these "Easy-to-use" overlays. I have among my friends a 1800 (FFTT) player who plays with Bluestorm Z3 (42,5°) and the other 1500 (FFTT) with soft V>03 like R37... So it's still usable after all.

I think the carbon blade earlier thing mostly should apply to high level juniors though. of course a 12 year old national level player who practices 20 hours a week can use carbon but for recreational youth players who do have structured practice but maybe practice like 3 hours a week it still probably makes sense to have them play with an all+ all wood blade or so, doesn't it?

 
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Can anyone who has played both Andro GTT 45 as well as Nittaku Factive compare these two rubbers? I am trying to decide between them.
 
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