Harder rubber better for opening up backspin?

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I understand softer rubbers - more dwell - more effect on spin
Im currently using a soft rubber on my BH Rakza 7 soft (39deg). And i like to attack everything, even super backspin serves etc. and it works well.
Currently thinking of moving to a harder rubber Rakza Z(50-52deg), but wondering how this will effect my ability to open up backspin balls.
Im not worried about the longer balls as i will have enough swing to open it. although more worried the shorter balls where the motion is much shorter like a bh flick against a backspin ball.
would having a softer rubber be better for this or a harder rubber ?
And why ? (id like to know the specific effects of each)

Thanks,
 
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Need to work more with harder. With softer you get more help from sponge.
 
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Keep in mind that you want to switch to not only a harder rubber, but also harder and tacky rubber. Tackiness makes the difference too.

Yeah i play well with h3 on my fh. Tacky requires bigger strokes right ( more brush)
 
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Feel like tacky need less brush. Tackiness give you spin.
 
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I’m wondering why you think you can “attack everything” including “short super backspin serves”.
 
Feel like tacky need less brush. Tackiness give you spin.
Tacky rubbetlrs need brush contact because engaging the sponge with little or no brushing gives you a slower ball and also hits the net.
 
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Going from Rakza 7 soft to Rakza Z might be too big of a jump in my opinion. Maybe try regular Rakza 7 instead.

My favorite backhand rubber at the moment is JOOLA Rhyzer Pro 45. The 'Rhyzer Pro' topsheet is quite good for both hitting AND brushing (unlike the standard "Rhyzer" (not 'pro') topsheet. I also find that the 45 degree sponge is more appropriate for my backhand compared to Rhyzer Pro 50. I able to do a nice brushy opening backhand loop with it, but I can also hit through the sponge on other shots if I need to.
 
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I’m wondering why you think you can “attack everything” including “short super backspin serves”.

Ryu seems to agree (watch the movie, do not read title only)

Flicking every ball backspin ball is not only hard (short movement), but also limits receives of said flick.
 
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Whether moving to a harder sponge helps also depends a lot on your BH techniques and preferences.

Are you the type that creates spin using the surface of the topsheet only? Or are you the type that engages the sponge type?

There are also other considerations too. Do you often do hit thru style or spin everything?

All this little stuff will drive your preference and tell you what suits you better.

On general terms, softer rubbers allow a longer dwelling time and higher safety margin.

Harder rubbers has a shorter dwelling time but may be compensated with tackier topsheet, however due to the hardness of the sponge, technique and positioning need to be right for crisp contact, thus the lower safety margin. You may find yourself either overshooting or hitting the net more often vs the softer rubber.
 
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Whether moving to a harder sponge helps also depends a lot on your BH techniques and preferences.

Are you the type that creates spin using the surface of the topsheet only? Or are you the type that engages the sponge type?

There are also other considerations too. Do you often do hit thru style or spin everything?

All this little stuff will drive your preference and tell you what suits you better.

On general terms, softer rubbers allow a longer dwelling time and higher safety margin.

Harder rubbers has a shorter dwelling time but may be compensated with tackier topsheet, however due to the hardness of the sponge, technique and positioning need to be right for crisp contact, thus the lower safety margin. You may find yourself either overshooting or hitting the net more often vs the softer rubber.

Thanks, yeah i find myself putting more spin into most shots as the H3 taught me this.

I feel as though my BH looping/flicking technique is good although im not a high lvl player. arnd 800RC, not here for gameplay tips tho (ofc im not saying i attack literally every ball). just asking about the effects of harder/softer rubbers
 
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I understand softer rubbers - more dwell - more effect on spin
Im currently using a soft rubber on my BH Rakza 7 soft (39deg). And i like to attack everything, even super backspin serves etc. and it works well.
Yes, R7 soft is good. I like max on the FH.

Currently thinking of moving to a harder rubber Rakza Z(50-52deg), but wondering how this will effect my ability to open up backspin balls.
Why?
Looping back spin is a matter of technique, not the hardness of the rubber.


Im not worried about the longer balls as i will have enough swing to open it. although more worried the shorter balls where the motion is much shorter like a bh flick against a backspin ball.
would having a softer rubber be better for this or a harder rubber ?
I understand the problem. Again it is a matter of technique but I too have had the problem where I try to do a simple wrist loop and the brushing action is too light and the ball seems to skid off the rubber.
I am a 'goldilocks' person. There is too hard, too soft and just right.
I am not a fan of the latest hard rubber craze. I don't see any advantage to hard rubbers/sponges except that they don't 'bottom out' as easily.

And why ? (id like to know the specific effects of each)

Thanks,
This is hard to quantify but I don't see a need for harder rubber unless you think you are 'bottoming out' too often. If this is the case I would not get a harder rubber at first. I would change my stroke to brush more so the tangential impact is slower but the spin is higher. Brushing more does require better timing and footwork to get into position.
 
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