I am good at training matches but I am so bad in competition

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Everyone has this problem. You can only fix it in competition. Play more competitive matches, and learn to accept the bad results, until you no longer get any nerves. Also remember that everyone plays differently in real matches, and they try very hard not to let you play in your comfort zone.

Or, possibly try meditation to calm yourself at will.
 
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Brs

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Brs

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Ask your opponent to play the training matches the same as he plays competition. Then he will beat you at 4 both times, problem solved.
 
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As others pointed out, there could be two distinct reasons for this:

* You are playing much worse in competition - most likely due to pressure and nerves. Play more tournaments or any other matches with something on the line.

* Your opponents do not play at full strength in practice, probably deciding to work on specific aspect of their game, trying out different tactics, not using best serves etc. A bit surprising that you are beating them then, but eventually you'd see that someone is not playing at full strength, so win/loss is kind of meaningless here.
 
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As others pointed out, there could be two distinct reasons for this:

* You are playing much worse in competition - most likely due to pressure and nerves. Play more tournaments or any other matches with something on the line.

* Your opponents do not play at full strength in practice, probably deciding to work on specific aspect of their game, trying out different tactics, not using best serves etc. A bit surprising that you are beating them then, but eventually you'd see that someone is not playing at full strength, so win/loss is kind of meaningless here.

He is playing full strength in practice and he doesn't need to be play full strength at competition because I can't enforce him. I'm losing easily with unforced errors.
 
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He is playing full strength in practice and he doesn't need to be play full strength at competition because I can't enforce him. I'm losing easily with unforced errors.

Then it is likely the problem is in your head - you are too nervous and can't play your own game (but you should still pay attention to what you opponent does differently in competition - perhaps you have a glaring weakness and he simply exploits it in matches that matter).

Listen to what 'darucla' said earlier - play more competition!
 
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Go take a 4 months vacation to Korea, rent a closet sized room for USD $150-$200 a month, get a TT club membership for $60 USD a month, and make chicken and beer round robin with the club players 2x a week.

They will appreciate your generosity and you will get paid with some of the fiercest competition you can find, even better than tourneys.

You could also do the Man-Won BBANG! You get 5-6 players together, everyone tosses in $10 USD on the table (Man-Won in Korean. You make a round robin where everyone plays everyone. Place 1 gets all the money. All the losers get nothing. (BBANG) That is a very fierce competition too. For the price of $10, you get better experience than a tourney, don't anyone get on the high horse for gambling, entering a tourney with cash prizes is like gambling, but lower odds. This is straight up tourney training at a discount price.
 
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