Jiang Jingkun does long pushes and choppy stroke

says Aging is a killer
I like Liang Jingkun. He always seems to be in trouble when playing against top players and lesser players;). But he has a way of playing unconventional strokes especially when in trouble

In this match vs Cai Wei, watch the 5th game where he brings out a few Waldner-nesque stroke-play when under pressure.

At 11:20, look at that very brave long push to the wide FH
At 11:50, A choppy stroke that brings doubt and hesitation to his opponent
At 12:13, another brave long push into the body resulting in him countering the relatively weak topspin

https://youtu.be/gqr2--A_sN0?t=680




 
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2020 table tennis: Backspin strokes are obsolete!
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What an age we live in where a long push to the forehand is considered unconventional and brave.
 
says Aging is a killer
Long push or tsutsuki is very fundamental technique in table tennis. I dont know why you call this unconventional and brave.
As for 11:50 it's just him being pussy. If the opponent is WCQ or FZD caliber, I believe they will loop such ball.

"Unconventional and brave" - because not many people try it too often. Unconventional? I'll give you that. It is used fairly regularly by European pro players that I've seen.
Brave? This is what can happen when it is tried against a top CNT lefthander attacker. See the first point.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1SmfPoYhW4


"If the opponent is WCQ or FZD caliber", - I have been playing and watching TT for nearly 60years. For much of that time, there has always been an observer who would say, "(insert name) would have (insert stroke) that ball". Of course they are always correct and so is the opposite, why? because it can't be proven one way or the other.
Look again at the sequence. LJK was caught out. But because he has a tendency to 'try things' he came up with a very unconventional stroke in today's top level TT. Cai was caught out and was too far away from the ball to easily loop it. That's why he probably took the cautious approach to simply get the ball on the table. As to WCQ and FZD, I believe that for any player caught in the same circumstance, an attempt at a loop would be a 'Hail Mary' situation. That is, unlikely to succeed.

Here is FZD having problems with one of LJK's standard long pushes.
https://youtu.be/XPDgbiH2924?t=140
The point of the thread is that the deliberate long push is still very useful when used properly, even against the best players in the world. LJK exploits these long pushes very effectively and even us low level players can learn something here.
 
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Ma Long does these things all the time?
Pushing long is not unconventional, especially long push to the body, it’s a popular thing actually. They use it to mix with the short pushes to catch the opponent off guard. Idk why you find ljk special with that.
 
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I do agree with the OP, and I would also add: you have to be brave to attack those pushes ! FZD isn't enough brave obviously, he has a tendency to "loop back", what I mean here: his body goes back on his heels to loop strong pushes with his BH. We all know now it's a big mistake. Ma Long on the other hand is fearless on his BH strokes, that's why he beats LJK most of the time. We also know now that LJK has beaten FZD several times, the most painful was at the... WTTC 2019.

Dan in his video with Dima is also talking about it: never step or lean back on your BH, always think "forward".
 
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Ma Long does these things all the time?
Pushing long is not unconventional, especially long push to the body, it’s a popular thing actually. They use it to mix with the short pushes to catch the opponent off guard. Idk why you find ljk special with that.
Probably because the "chinese school" mostly emphasizes on short pushes to avoid opponent's attack. Fact is: with the P ball nowadays it's safe to push long, it's easier to generate spin when pushing than when looping, also the ball falls down quicker as it is heavier. That's why players have to be stronger, more athletic these days. Wasn't the same with the old school and lighter 38mm cell ball... and speed glue: any long push against Saive, Rosskopf, Primo or Gatien would have resulted in a punishment in return.
 
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