Need help selecting a blade

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So I want to build my own racket. I'm planning on putting Rakza 7 on both sides but don't know about the price of the blade. I want to keep it in a budget for it not being expensive. I was thinking of a 40€ blades for exaple: Donic Persson Carbotec or Donic Burn but I was wondering if I could get away with it being cheaper. Both of the blades in offensive variant .I already have a friend with this type of setup and I really like It. Or maybe you can reffer me to a better type of blade.
 

Brs

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Brs

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If you have tried your friend's setup and really like it - buy that. You are unlikely to get something you like better from untried Internet advice.
 
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If you have tried your friend's setup and really like it - buy that. You are unlikely to get something you like better from untried Internet advice.
Yeah but does the blade matter that much? If it's cheap or really expensive?
 
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Yeah but does the blade matter that much? If it's cheap or really expensive?

Cheap or expensive doesn't matter, matter if suits well or not your way to play, I see very well made cheap blades & very bad expensive blades quality....& viceversa of course.

 
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So I want to build my own racket. I'm planning on putting Rakza 7 on both sides but don't know about the price of the blade. I want to keep it in a budget for it not being expensive. I was thinking of a 40€ blades for exaple: Donic Persson Carbotec or Donic Burn but I was wondering if I could get away with it being cheaper. Both of the blades in offensive variant .I already have a friend with this type of setup and I really like It. Or maybe you can reffer me to a better type of blade.

Of course you can get away with cheaper.

You can get really good $20 Yinhe or Sanwei blades.

 
says Table tennis clown
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So I want to build my own racket. I'm planning on putting Rakza 7 on both sides but don't know about the price of the blade. I want to keep it in a budget for it not being expensive. I was thinking of a 40€ blades for exaple: Donic Persson Carbotec or Donic Burn but I was wondering if I could get away with it being cheaper. Both of the blades in offensive variant .I already have a friend with this type of setup and I really like It. Or maybe you can reffer me to a better type of blade.

Here in the forum there is a "best way" to get answers to your problem and that is to make a short video of yourself
playing and then post it in this thread :

[h1]Video Footage Safe Thread[/h1]
Anything else just will ad to the confusion. 😁
 
says Fzding around...
says Fzding around...
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So I want to build my own racket. I'm planning on putting Rakza 7 on both sides but don't know about the price of the blade. I want to keep it in a budget for it not being expensive. I was thinking of a 40€ blades for exaple: Donic Persson Carbotec or Donic Burn but I was wondering if I could get away with it being cheaper. Both of the blades in offensive variant .I already have a friend with this type of setup and I really like It. Or maybe you can reffer me to a better type of blade.

No one knows what is better for you. The optimal approach is to try your friends' rackets.
Some players are sensitive to equipment and some are not. Some are sensitive to the shape of the handle, balance, head size etc and some are not. Only you know the answer.
And one more thing, more expensive rackets have better veneers, better processing. there is no shortcut. I'm not saying to buy a superexpensive blade but be aware of this. You get better feel, feedback, better quality shots with the same effort.

 
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People are making this way too complicated. If someone says they are building their first racket AND they are asking for advice on here we can deduce a few things.

Firstly, it is their first racket. Secondly, they don't have access to a coach who can give them equipment advice. Thirdly, they are old enough to use the Internet.

Ergo: Here is the perfect blade for you:

https://www.tabletennis11.com/other_eng/donic-appelgren-allplay
 
says Table tennis clown
says Table tennis clown
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People are making this way too complicated. If someone says they are building their first racket AND they are asking for advice on here we can deduce a few things.

Firstly, it is their first racket. Secondly, they don't have access to a coach who can give them equipment advice. Thirdly, they are old enough to use the Internet.

Ergo: Here is the perfect blade for you:

https://www.tabletennis11.com/other_eng/donic-appelgren-allplay


and just to prove my point
🤣
29/11/2016 ordinary piece of wood ! Overrated blade! Review by Ivan Michieli
Quality
[tbody] [/tbody]
I was extremely disappointed with this blade! It is maybe for kids and total beginners and that is also questionable!!
 
says Spin and more spin.
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So I want to build my own racket. I'm planning on putting Rakza 7 on both sides but don't know about the price of the blade. I want to keep it in a budget for it not being expensive. I was thinking of a 40€ blades for exaple: Donic Persson Carbotec or Donic Burn but I was wondering if I could get away with it being cheaper. Both of the blades in offensive variant .I already have a friend with this type of setup and I really like It. Or maybe you can reffer me to a better type of blade.
If you have tried your friend's setup and really like it - buy that. You are unlikely to get something you like better from untried Internet advice.

You don't really need any more information than what Brs has given you. The rest of the thread would actually be redundant if you had simply taken his advice. It is excellent advice.

But, I may as well give a little more. If the blade you tried was the Donic Burn Off or the Donic Burn Off- those are great blades with really nice feeling. Go for it. If it was not one of those but when you used it you like it, still, what Brs said is really the only information you actually need.

Yeah but does the blade matter that much? If it's cheap or really expensive?

A lot of the time, in Table Tennis, the blades that are more expensive are more expensive because of things like fancy materials like carbon or carbon weaved with arylate and any number of other things like that. Nobody on this forum actually needs a blade that is more expensive than the Donic Burn Off. Many people on this forum are using blades much more expensive than that. But almost everyone on this forum would be fine with a run of the mill, 5 or 7 ply, all wood, simple blade which could cost anywhere from $14.00 to $150.00.

While it is true that some of the blades that are higher priced are better crafted. But, NOT ALWAYS. And if my friend is using a blade that is really nice and cost $150.00 and I am using a blade that costs $40.00, then I could by 3 for less than the price of that $150.00 blade. And the blade won't really make me play any differently.

I have a decently nice, all wood, 5 ply blade. I like it. I use it. It cost about $100.00. It was hand made to my specifications. I got exactly what I wanted. But, I can think of any number of blades that are similar enough and cost between $20-$40 that, are, in the most important ways, just as good as mine and me using them would not change my playing level AT ALL.

Get what you tried from your friend. Save yourself some money. Don't be fooled by the table tennis companies marketing hype. Carbon, or ALC, or ZLF or ZLC or SALC or SZLC or any number of other things you see as composite plies are really not needed. There are pros who still use all wood blades. But, when you are at a decently high level, maybe you will want something fancy with one of those acronyms added after the name of the blade. For now, simple and not too expensive is almost definitely better for your development. Often carbon and other composites make the blade a little too fast for a player who wants to develop and improve.

 
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says Spin and more spin.
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BTW: I have a few friends who are crazy good, semi-pro level. They can beat many players playing seriously for under 3 years with a tiny racket, a cell phone, a shoe, a rock, a block of wood, a big lollipop. Now, that sounds like I am joking, and it is pretty silly. But it is also true. These guys can play with anything and beat most players who are (USATT rating) under 1500, with almost any object you hand to them....even a frying pan.

So, for a player who is not all that high a level, is the equipment really the important thing? No, training is. Playing, practicing, working to improve.

But it is still fine to get something you like. If you can afford it, there is no reason you can't get yourself a FZD SZLC ($400.00 USD). But, you would be getting that because you want it and can afford it. Not because you need it. And I guarantee, it will not allow you to play better. And I have an odds on bet that it will actually cause you to miss more shots long and into the net than a $40.00 all wood blade would.
 
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says Spin and more spin.
says Spin and more spin.
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The main things a developing player needs from equipment are:

1) A blade that is of decent enough quality that is not too fast and not too slow. A blade that is categorized as being in the All+, Off- or Off speed classes. Probably a lot of blades in the Off speed class are actually a little too fast. But many of them would still be fine.

2) Rubbers that grip the ball and allow you to learn how to generate spin and adjust to/ compensate for incoming spin.

That is really all you need and there are many many many good blades and rubbers that you can get that are well made and fairly inexpensive that would allow you to learn and develop your table tennis skills.

This also explains why Brs's comment was all you actually should have needed. But, some times us humans think and obsess of stuff that does not matter way too much for our own good.

 
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I assume from the flag that you are in Slovakia. Any 5-ply blade with Limba top is fine, so it just depends where you want to buy it.

E.g. the Neottec Vodoo Classic (https://www.tabletennis11.com/other_eng/neottec-voodoo-classic) $26 at tabletennis11.com (in Estonia, problem is the high shipping cost to the USA for orders under ~$100 but since you are in Slovakia, shipping is 7.5 Euros with 2-4 week delivery). See this YouTube review by its owners testing 3 rubbers on that blade. Or the Xiom Offensive S or Allround S for about $50 (on that one the flared handle is unusually flat and wide).

E.g.: Yinhe E-3, $22 at princett.com (HongKong) or Yinhe E3 VB at aliexpress. (2-4 weeks shipping)

So if my life depends on it, I can put together a racket for $50 almost including shipping (but maybe not assembly) as follows:
Yinhe E-3 with Yinhe Moon medium sponge forehand, Yinhe Moon soft sponge backhand. Or in the USA go with the colestt combo. The Moon rubbers are similar to the Rakza 7.
 
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