Open Angle Loop

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Hi guys,

i got catched via a great tutorial on youtube by the idea of opening up the racket angle while looping.

I kinda feels like i can attack long balls with more consistency. So while the racket angle could stay open for backspin and topspin ball, it's still important to find the right amount of forward and upward motion between these two shots.

I wonder about other opinions. Is this still looping or more of a hitting with adding enough spin to get the ball over the net.

Also are the new rubber generation of thin topsheet and thick sponge beneficial to this style...
 
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Hi guys,

i got catched via a great tutorial on youtube by the idea of opening up the racket angle while looping.

I kinda feels like i can attack long balls with more consistency. So while the racket angle could stay open for backspin and topspin ball, it's still important to find the right amount of forward and upward motion between these two shots.

I wonder about other opinions. Is this still looping or more of a hitting with adding enough spin to get the ball over the net.

Also are the new rubber generation of thin topsheet and thick sponge beneficial to this style...

this is called a roll
its a very useful technique against chop. it requires practice to play to a good length

 
Hi guys,

i got catched via a great tutorial on youtube by the idea of opening up the racket angle while looping.

I kinda feels like i can attack long balls with more consistency. So while the racket angle could stay open for backspin and topspin ball, it's still important to find the right amount of forward and upward motion between these two shots.

I wonder about other opinions. Is this still looping or more of a hitting with adding enough spin to get the ball over the net.

Also are the new rubber generation of thin topsheet and thick sponge beneficial to this style...

I open my angle when looping - especially for harder sponge rubbers (Chinese, hybrid) because you have to engage the sponge to make a consistent powerful shot, if angle too close you will miss the ball more often

 
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Hi guys,

i got catched via a great tutorial on youtube by the idea of opening up the racket angle while looping.

I kinda feels like i can attack long balls with more consistency. So while the racket angle could stay open for backspin and topspin ball, it's still important to find the right amount of forward and upward motion between these two shots.

I wonder about other opinions. Is this still looping or more of a hitting with adding enough spin to get the ball over the net.

Also are the new rubber generation of thin topsheet and thick sponge beneficial to this style...

You are right. To utilize the new generation of thin topsheet and thick sponge rubbers, opening of blade face is beneficial. Also, I must say this, our eyes deceive us. Professional players also have a more 'hit through the ball stroke' based on the trajectory of the incoming ball. For example, if you catch the ball on the rise (before it peaks) or at it top most point, then you can go more through the ball i.e. more forward and less upwards with your stroke. On the other hand, if you catch the ball after it has peaked then you need to have more spin oriented stroke. But in both strokes, you can open the face of your paddle and let the ball sink into the sponge for maximum catapult.
I remember in Korean tutorials with English subs, it was mentioned by Kim Jung Hoon that we should open the face of the paddle more for a stable shot. Check this out -
https://www.tabletennisdaily.com/forum/showthread.php?19757-Kim-Jung-Hoon-FH-Loop-Pointers

 
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Hi guys,

thank you for your comments. I also read the thread and watched the videos of the Korean guy.

I'm curious that both styles are kinda working. If u watch Training videos between Ovtcharov and Ma Long there u can see the closed angle by Dima and the open one by ML. Backhand wise i watched a training with ML and FZD. ML has a curious Backhand style, it's kinda like a punch forward with low hanging arm and very closed angle while FZD has a very open angle with a shorter swing, which i see more and more on chinese tutorials.
 
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Hi guys,

thank you for your comments. I also read the thread and watched the videos of the Korean guy.

I'm curious that both styles are kinda working. If u watch Training videos between Ovtcharov and Ma Long there u can see the closed angle by Dima and the open one by ML. Backhand wise i watched a training with ML and FZD. ML has a curious Backhand style, it's kinda like a punch forward with low hanging arm and very closed angle while FZD has a very open angle with a shorter swing, which i see more and more on chinese tutorials.

I would repeat myself - Our eyes deceive us. Also, keep in mind, Dima's fitness level and timing is something which he has achieved by practicing countless number of hours. For amateur players, like me, I would take lessons from a coach and do a multi-ball drills to hone in my skills. Watching top players for their tactics is very useful but following their strokes or trying to incorporate the same technique is very difficult.
I have nothing against any youtube tutorial but I would say this, your stroke mechanics follows a framework, for example - the way you grip your paddle, the way you approach and contact the ball, your body position, your footwork before the stroke and after the stroke and your preparation for the next ball with right anticipation are some aspects which are interconnected and cannot be handled in isolation after a certain level of practice. A coach can help you in making subtle adjustments and help you realize what to do next, once you have made the first shot. On the other hand, youtube tutorial is focused on one aspect of the stroke which in my opinion is just showing a still image without focusing on the movie.
Table tennis is more a mental game and you need to keep fine tuning your approach as you keep practicing.

 
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Hi KM,

you are absolutely right, we just see a frame without knowing all context information.

Yesterday i had some nice league games. My backhand open up was great, just like KJH showed in one of his video. But for BH loop i just cant find the right feeling. I feel like turning the elbow widely out works best for me, but this feels so unnatural...

I also play the same rubbers like you on fh + bh and considered to switch to some thin and soft topsheet + thick sponge type, just for a better feeling if playing non-hard strokes. I decided to stay with the Fastarc because they kinda force you to play with full commitment, which might be against a good feeling but supports to attack consistently. Did you consider to play the C1 also on your fh or G1 also on your bh? I think it's also a physological thing. With a softer bh rubber it's kinda like: "my backhand cant be that strong like my forehand".
 
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Hi KM,

you are absolutely right, we just see a frame without knowing all context information.

Yesterday i had some nice league games. My backhand open up was great, just like KJH showed in one of his video. But for BH loop i just cant find the right feeling. I feel like turning the elbow widely out works best for me, but this feels so unnatural...

I also play the same rubbers like you on fh + bh and considered to switch to some thin and soft topsheet + thick sponge type, just for a better feeling if playing non-hard strokes. I decided to stay with the Fastarc because they kinda force you to play with full commitment, which might be against a good feeling but supports to attack consistently. Did you consider to play the C1 also on your fh or G1 also on your bh? I think it's also a physological thing. With a softer bh rubber it's kinda like: "my backhand cant be that strong like my forehand".

Ya, medium-soft rubber is good to develop your stroke feeling and gain control also create a consistent stroke mechanics. A funny thing I always mention to my TT buddies, is that the best thing which I did for myself is that I stopped using Tenergy. LoL.
I also use Donic Acuda S2 on my backhand and it is amazing. But here again, now what I do is I pick any rubber from a reputed brand which is on sale and has 42.5 or 45 degree sponge and it does the job.
The best tip apart from all the above hardware jargon I can share it to let go of putting power to your stroke. Just focus on the timing of the shot and where you want the ball to go. The more relaxed you are and the better your timing, more consistent you can expect your results.Good Luck!

 
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I fully agree on your post. On all parts. Especially on:

"...to let go of putting power to your stroke"

This is a huge aspect i also try to implement. Sadly it's a bit more compicated that this for me. If i try to play really "loosy" and "relaxed" my loops are insane, especially spin-wise. The downside is... sometimes it's that loosy that either i cant get the ball over the net because there is no power or the ball can be shot down...

also playing more relaxed really works out on my forehand side right now but not on my backhand... but i try to work on it.

i guess the holy grail is to balance relaxation (especially on the grip) and putting enough pressure on the ball. maybe u can give me a tip here to implement this more effectively.

i know you dont like videos but it's a thing i also noticed by very high rated players and their rallies. if u dont hear the wood the loopings are really nice to watch... if they hit too hard and u can hear the wood its more of a hit or miss thing :)
 
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