Strategy for dealing with Harimoto's screaming

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Don't let me down Zyu, I am counting on those two free boxes of cheeze-its that you are right (about having more match experience and higher level ones). Still, you both could be right. A TTR 1000 player can still observe, see stuff and analyze. A TTR 2000 usually does it more and better more often I would believe.
 
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Don't let me down Zyu, I am counting on those two free boxes of cheeze-its that you are right (about having more match experience and higher level ones). Still, you both could be right. A TTR 1000 player can still observe, see stuff and analyze. A TTR 2000 usually does it more and better more often I would believe.

Hahaha if fais wants to go down that route, we can see what happens. But there's no need to antagonize anyone for being a lower level or less experienced player and I didn't want it to come across that way. However, there are often very different perspectives about things based on the manner in which one consumes table tennis (serious play versus fandom/non-playing related subject matter) so I was trying to highlight that here.

You sure you wouldn't rather two boxes of Lysol wipes?
 
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If it became known I has TWO fresh new containers of cleaning wipes, I would be in a constant fight to defend the home. The collateral damage would be staggering and certainly not worth it. You see how so many people mobbed the Cosco stores for such things, it was worse than if they have a neon sign advertising free cases of beers!!

You are right, it is better not to pursue that. It isn't about a lower level being wrong, I am a lower level player comparatively to an elite so I am in the boat too. There are still so many aspects of higher level play that I need to learn and improve upon.
 
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I am simply saying that serious players don't generally get worked up about this stuff, much less matches that they DIDN'T PLAY IN and watched on YouTube.
.

It stops being about getting worked up and more about having to pop a Tylenol due to screaming induced headache. Effing seriously, choing is one thing, yelling so loud that I pop an eardrum after every point is another. His screams are so bad, I don’t even watch his games on mute, because I can literally lip-read those yells.
 
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The translation is pretty obviously what piligrim was implying, learn to read through the lines.

No problem with you stating that you are annoyed by his cho'ing. Just simply stating a few facts - pro players are largely not bothered by it since it is low on their priority list of things to worry about. And for the people watching on YouTube, use the mute button or don't watch his matches if its really so intolerable. What is so complicated about that? Oh, but then how will you get your "no greater pleasure in life" than seeing him lose? LOL.

Oh I know how to read between the lines, but just like I said your translation is borderline childish insults and generalization on all people that don't agree with you. Quite sad really, you should learn to respect other people's opinion you clearly have serious trouble with that. Work on it while you are isolated.

Also what you clearly didn't read between the lines of my comment is that piligrim's comment was just dumb. It was just a really dumb comment, reading between the lines or not. If you wanna say X, say X, otherwise we get some keyboard warriors like yourself trying to pull shit from their metaphorical assholes trying to defend a screaming child for whatever reason. Maybe follow your advice that you like to repeat so much, if you don't like people that dislike Harimoto screeching, block them, its your literal advise on how to deal with something you dont like right ?
 
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It stops being about getting worked up and more about having to pop a Tylenol due to screaming induced headache. Effing seriously, choing is one thing, yelling so loud that I pop an eardrum after every point is another. His screams are so bad, I don’t even watch his games on mute, because I can literally lip-read those yells.

Never had an issue with popped eardrums or being so distraught by a video I'd have to willingly click into and watch for several minutes on end despite knowing what's going to happen. But I hope you manage to find a solution to such an unfortunate affliction.
 
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Oh I know how to read between the lines, but just like I said your translation is borderline childish insults and generalization on all people that don't agree with you. Quite sad really, you should learn to respect other people's opinion you clearly have serious trouble with that. Work on it while you are isolated.

Also what you clearly didn't read between the lines of my comment is that piligrim's comment was just dumb. It was just a really dumb comment, reading between the lines or not. If you wanna say X, say X, otherwise we get some keyboard warriors like yourself trying to pull shit from their metaphorical assholes trying to defend a screaming child for whatever reason. Maybe follow your advice that you like to repeat so much, if you don't like people that dislike Harimoto screeching, block them, its your literal advise on how to deal with something you dont like right ?

Lmao the hypocrisy in this post and previous ones is astounding. Again, made it quite clear I'm not insulting anyone for how they choose to get their table tennis fix. Generalizing? Absolutely. Generalizations can be made, and the one that I made is very often true whether you like them or not. Would you like to prove me wrong? Do you think the "Screamoto" internet crowd are people who are most concerned about their own game, or fans of the game who spend more time on YouTube than the table? Which one are you?
 
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I know one should be grown and ignore scremoto banshee like players, but these help https://www.alpinehearingprotection.com/. I use them for motorcycle, they stay nice in the ear even when excercising. They are tuned with for different uses. I would suggest the MusicSafe, because they have highest damping in range of 2k-8k and where children squicking hurts the most (look for isophonic lines and human (specially children) voice spectrum if you want to argue about it).
 
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Ok, I had been following this discussion and reading the comments shared by forum members. Some of us find it totally unnecessary to shout and cho on every point while for others it doesn't matters. But at some level, each of us notices it and definitely it gets registered in our mind. Also, it creates an impression that the person who is shouting on top of his lungs is basically getting cheap points not because he is superior but might be that he is creating a distraction with his screaming which is not allowing his opponent to concentrate hard enough.
Ok, I am not saying that Harimoto is not talented, I cannot dream of saying that - but here is the thing. My comments are more for club level players who idealize players like Harimoto and shout on every point. I have seen it, experienced it and may be you have too.
The first thought which come to mind is always that this is a diversion tactic and is just trying to increase my blood pressure unnecessarily.
May be choing for Harimoto is valid, he has his reasons and also when observed closely he is doing it not to disturb his opponent but the lower level players who idealize this kind of behavior do not follow the same ethics.
Without opening the can of worms, I would say this - I had a pleasure of playing at a very prestigious club in New Jersey last year. I observed that one of the coaches there is having a very short temper. He was practicing with his fellow student and on missing a topspin rally he started cursing the rubber and eventually kicked the table. After being a witness to such kind of behavior, I started noticing the kids who practice and learn there. Most of them had the same behavior and same reaction since they idealize someone who is higher up in the hierarchy. Now this become a problem and always leaves a bad taste in highly competitive environment.
This is the problem which I sometimes find difficult to deal with.
At my level, I won't be playing Harimoto anytime, but surely, I do play players who just try to stand out not because of their skill but by cheap tactics.
 
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Ok, I had been following this discussion and reading the comments shared by forum members. Some of us find it totally unnecessary to shout and cho on every point while for others it doesn't matters. But at some level, each of us notices it and definitely it gets registered in our mind. Also, it creates an impression that the person who is shouting on top of his lungs is basically getting cheap points not because he is superior but might be that he is creating a distraction with his screaming which is not allowing his opponent to concentrate hard enough.
Ok, I am not saying that Harimoto is not talented, I cannot dream of saying that - but here is the thing. My comments are more for club level players who idealize players like Harimoto and shout on every point. I have seen it, experienced it and may be you have too.
The first thought which come to mind is always that this is a diversion tactic and is just trying to increase my blood pressure unnecessarily.
May be choing for Harimoto is valid, he has his reasons and also when observed closely he is doing it not to disturb his opponent but the lower level players who idealize this kind of behavior do not follow the same ethics.
Without opening the can of worms, I would say this - I had a pleasure of playing at a very prestigious club in New Jersey last year. I observed that one of the coaches there is having a very short temper. He was practicing with his fellow student and on missing a topspin rally he started cursing the rubber and eventually kicked the table. After being a witness to such kind of behavior, I started noticing the kids who practice and learn there. Most of them had the same behavior and same reaction since they idealize someone who is higher up in the hierarchy. Now this become a problem and always leaves a bad taste in highly competitive environment.
This is the problem which I sometimes find difficult to deal with.
At my level, I won't be playing Harimoto anytime, but surely, I do play players who just try to stand out not because of their skill but by cheap tactics.

Honestly if someone is screaming maniacally, I usually just internally laugh. If they are making a fool out of themselves I really don't see any reason to get bothered. I think that people who do are mentally weak. If it gets really excessive talk to them or a club manager/tournament director about it. Or use it as motivation to beat them. To each their own though.

People can only be judged by their own actions. Sure, they may have been unfortunately influenced in certain ways, but that's not for me to figure out.
 
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Ok, I had been following this discussion and reading the comments shared by forum members. Some of us find it totally unnecessary to shout and cho on every point while for others it doesn't matters. But at some level, each of us notices it and definitely it gets registered in our mind. Also, it creates an impression that the person who is shouting on top of his lungs is basically getting cheap points not because he is superior but might be that he is creating a distraction with his screaming which is not allowing his opponent to concentrate hard enough.
Ok, I am not saying that Harimoto is not talented, I cannot dream of saying that - but here is the thing. My comments are more for club level players who idealize players like Harimoto and shout on every point. I have seen it, experienced it and may be you have too.
The first thought which come to mind is always that this is a diversion tactic and is just trying to increase my blood pressure unnecessarily.
May be choing for Harimoto is valid, he has his reasons and also when observed closely he is doing it not to disturb his opponent but the lower level players who idealize this kind of behavior do not follow the same ethics.
Without opening the can of worms, I would say this - I had a pleasure of playing at a very prestigious club in New Jersey last year. I observed that one of the coaches there is having a very short temper. He was practicing with his fellow student and on missing a topspin rally he started cursing the rubber and eventually kicked the table. After being a witness to such kind of behavior, I started noticing the kids who practice and learn there. Most of them had the same behavior and same reaction since they idealize someone who is higher up in the hierarchy. Now this become a problem and always leaves a bad taste in highly competitive environment.
This is the problem which I sometimes find difficult to deal with.
At my level, I won't be playing Harimoto anytime, but surely, I do play players who just try to stand out not because of their skill but by cheap tactics.

That is a fair point. I was more on the side of those who just want to let him be, but I am no fan of the generalisation of loud, systematic and uncontrolled choing in the sport, at times down to the lowest levels. It cheapens the truly great rallies which would (to me, anyway) warrant this kind of reaction and the thing really hit me at one point back home in France, when a team-mate's girlfriend came to watch a match for the first and last time. There was a lot of that that day and even more loud annoyance at every shot missed, and frankly by the look on her face I just became embarrassed. 60+-year-old (not that it should matter, but doesn't help either) guys acting like unruly toddlers is a very un-sexy thing, and at times it wouldn't be a bad idea to keep the stakes and context in mind.

Harimoto's behaviour as described by yoass here, fine, by all means. Not to mention the genuine pressure and tight boundaries within which he lets loose. Loud over-reacting to be accepted and even expected at every turn of every match at every level, not cool and a downright turn-off, as far as I am concerned. I used to see a kind of direct parallel between TT and martial arts, even made a fairly smooth transition from one to the other as a kid/teenager and used to enjoy the general code of conduct in TT. But in these conditions the parallel becomes laughable, and something I'll keep in mind if it comes to my own children.
 
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That is a fair point. I was more on the side of those who just want to let him be, but I am no fan of the generalisation of loud, systematic and uncontrolled choing in the sport, at times down to the lowest levels. It cheapens the truly great rallies which would (to me, anyway) warrant this kind of reaction and the thing really hit me at one point back home in France, when a team-mate's girlfriend came to watch a match for the first and last time. There was a lot of that that day and even more loud annoyance at every shot missed, and frankly by the look on her face I just became embarrassed. 60+-year-old (not that it should matter, but doesn't help either) guys acting like unruly toddlers is a very un-sexy thing, and at times it wouldn't be a bad idea to keep the stakes and context in mind.

Harimoto's behaviour as described by yoass here, fine, by all means. Not to mention the genuine pressure and tight boundaries within which he lets loose. Loud over-reacting to be accepted and even expected at every turn of every match at every level, not cool and a downright turn-off, as far as I am concerned. I used to see a kind of direct parallel between TT and martial arts, even made a fairly smooth transition from one to the other as a kid/teenager and used to enjoy the general code of conduct in TT. But in these conditions the parallel becomes laughable, and something I'll keep in mind if it comes to my own children.


I am torn. Sure, he screams when HIS point is over. If he is the only one playing, perhaps acceptable. But would you like to play a competitive match on the table next to him, when you have no idea when his outbursts are going to occur? Do you get a let???
 
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I am torn. Sure, he screams when HIS point is over. If he is the only one playing, perhaps acceptable. But would you like to play a competitive match on the table next to him, when you have no idea when his outbursts are going to occur? Do you get a let???

Well again, I could push forward zyu81's approach here, as well as the martial arts analogy. Self-control and, if anything, learning to turn the tendency of your opponent to over-react against themselves. If a player gives all he has in his lungs after any given point, I am tempted to interpret it as though he has given everything he had in terms of skills. High motivation for me in the next few points to whack everything back into him although, most important of all, not ever showing any sign of being affected. If successful in the attempt, those players can collapse rather quickly. The whole affair requires practice however, natural temperament only takes you so far and it is probably necessary for most people to go through a number of infuriating losses against the likes before developing the right mindset. Again, in my case I had done this kind of work in judo mostly, where you quickly learn to detect any sort of unsteadiness in your opponent and exploit it (hardly ever any second chances in that sport either, plus it is physical and in direct contact, so focus and adrenaline will naturally tend to be high - either you learn to cope or you bail out, but you don't get to whinge). A most helpful ability in life, which I actually feel I have lost to an extent and I am strongly considering going back to this kind of activity. Also taking this point to an extreme, as you mention the possibility that the primadonna is not playing against you but at the next table: you don't get to complain that you were distracted by a bombshell landing close to you, on the battlefield. You either just keep to your objective, or you are lost. Speaking as a pacifist of some sort, but you get my point.

Now, two things. I don't believe Harimoto belongs in the category of players I have described, nor does anyone at that level. But the other thing is, everything I have mentioned here is from the practitioner/competitor's point of view, and may be achieved through self-discipline and a very conscious approach as to what is going on.
While the general environment in martial arts tends to nurture this kind of growth and mindset in a, should I say, "organic" manner (that is, even if you don't think hard about it), TT seems to be going in the opposite direction these days, in keeping with the overall social environment which is moving towards epidermal and overblown reactions (a most gratuitous and assailable generalisation, I know). That is what I don't like, not only does it promote the opposite of what I believe to be the correct long-term approach, it makes us look like idiots while we are at it.
 
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I propose the following tactic: grow a pair of balls and stop complaining about it.

If I were playing him I'd worry about my game, and since I'm not a lame complainer like most of the people who are still re-hashing this topic after 3 years, I'd be able to tune it out and do my thing. Seems like that tactic has worked for most of the players who have played against him thus far.

What he said.

Also, this is professional table tennis, not the usual let's-meet-in-the-park-with-my-bros-and-talk-about-the-most-expensive-equipment-to-replace-your-cheesy-technique-play. If you can't handle a boy screaming after he won a point, you don't have the confidence to deal with it.

If you'd spent your entire childhood, 9 hours a day for just one thing, you'd better make sure to win. What's your problem of him screaming after every point? Have you ever played in a regional tournament? Yes? Cool, because at any tournament you can find a screamer like him and nobody cares. What about Chinese female fans screaming «加油 [jia you]» all the time, see? Nobody cares.

If you'd be:


  • the youngest player ever to qualify for the main draw of an ITTF world tour event,
  • the youngest player to ever win an ITTF World Tour Open,
  • the youngest national singles champion,
  • the youngest player to ever win the World Junior Championships,
  • 11 years old and beat two top-100-player,

you can scream as loud as you want and people still respect your skill, commitment, discipline and confidence.

Long story short and to quote zyu81: «Grow a pair of balls and stop complaining about it.»


-
Cheers
 
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I am torn. Sure, he screams when HIS point is over. If he is the only one playing, perhaps acceptable. But would you like to play a competitive match on the table next to him, when you have no idea when his outbursts are going to occur? Do you get a let???

You don't much about gamesmanship do you:cool:? If you are playing next to him, you mutter to your opponent, "he's such a loud player isn't he, puts one off their game?". Then each time your opponent misses, at the crucial moment,you say, "Such an annoying player, that Harimoto".
 
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I am torn. Sure, he screams when HIS point is over. If he is the only one playing, perhaps acceptable. But would you like to play a competitive match on the table next to him, when you have no idea when his outbursts are going to occur? Do you get a let???

This is a very valid point. But it's not why any of the internet crowd is complaining. Sure, if I were in that situation where nearby noises were suddenly startling me, I'd talk to someone in charge.
 
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Lmao the hypocrisy in this post and previous ones is astounding. Again, made it quite clear I'm not insulting anyone for how they choose to get their table tennis fix. Generalizing? Absolutely. Generalizations can be made, and the one that I made is very often true whether you like them or not. Would you like to prove me wrong? Do you think the "Screamoto" internet crowd are people who are most concerned about their own game, or fans of the game who spend more time on YouTube than the table? Which one are you?

So you agree that your advise is just stupid or you are a hypocrite. Pick one.
 
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So you agree that your advise is just stupid or you are a hypocrite. Pick one.

Never gave any advice. As I've stated repeatedly now, I was speaking from the viewpoint of a certain type of person with a certain type of mindset (serious players). Feel free to respond to the core message of my post instead of being so triggered that I concluded that you're a casual. Still haven't told me my conclusion is incorrect, but there's nothing wrong with it either way.
 
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