Tackiness versus grippiness

This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Active Member
Jul 2017
746
372
1,218
I'm not good enough to judge if that is true but both Timo and dima have said about the tacky rubbers that the big advantage isn't really top end spin but that you have more security.

Dima said you can generate a lot of spin with tenergy too but with the tacky dignics he is able to take a big swing and still have safety when he is slightly in a bad footwork position or has read the spin wrong and has a slightly wrong racket angle.

It seems like the tacky rubber kinda "smothers" the opponents spin so that even if you have not quite perfectly read the spin you can still take a big hack and land it on the table (if you can generate big spin yourself with your swing of course).

He said with tenergy he needed to read the spin better and have a more precise racket angle.

I think that is similar in tennis with the polyester strings. Those strings deaden the ball a little, but since the pros have so much power and spin it allows them to take huge cuts at the ball all the time and still land the ball securely.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PingBirdPong
says Table tennis clown
says Table tennis clown
Well-Known Member
Apr 2020
3,508
1,950
7,670

Some of the glossy tables can mess with your head!!!! The table I have at home is pretty grippy, so when I try and practice ghost or heavy back spin serves, the ball holds up nicely then spins back into the net, the tables at the club I train at, still have some grip, but it’s less than my home table, it’s harder to get the ball to return into the net.
At first I thought I was not performing the serve correctly, but it’s the table not the player in this instance. .

similar experience here.
I dislike not only glossy tables but also glossy balls

 
  • Like
Reactions: PingBirdPong
says ESN 42 hardness is my magic number
says ESN 42 hardness is my magic number
Well-Known Member
Mar 2021
2,545
2,649
6,016
From my personal experience, when I execute slow & spinny loop with a spinny Euro Rubber ( re: Donic Baracuda which is a very spinny rubber ) my opponent can return it no problem.

When I use H3, the ball kick out of the table. It would appear H3 is more spinny from my perspective. Is this experience similar to other players?
 
says Shoo...nothing to see here. - zeio
says Shoo...nothing to see here. - zeio
Well-Known Member
Jan 2018
7,542
9,529
18,874
Scenario 1. Grippy rubber is better for returning spin.
Scenario 2. Tacky rubber is better for generating spin once the force gets past a certain threshold. Put another way, tacky rubber has higher spin potential. If a player does not hit hard enough, tacky rubber will spin less than grippy rubber.

Scenario 1 is demonstrated in many studies where a robot shoots a topspin ball at a stationary racket, simulating the block stroke in real play. However, that does not carry over to Scenario 2 because a ball carries much less momentum than a racket does in real play. For example, a ball of 2.7g at 13m/s carries a momentum of 0.0351kg⋅m/s. A Biside blade with 2 sheets of Sriver in 1.9mm with a total weight of 171g has a "hitting weight" of 78.1g when hit at location A in a loop stroke, which translates to a momentum of 1.014kg⋅m/s at 13m/s. A 29 times difference.

Due to its light weight, to get a ball to carry the same momentum as a racket would require shooting the ball at supersonic speed, but then the ball becomes a cannon at that velocity since kinetic energy increases as the square of velocity. 2 times the velocity, 4 times the kinetic energy. 3 times the velocity, 9 times the kinetic energy. 29 times the velocity, 841 times the kinetic energy.

Takkyu Labo shows that tacky rubber and grippy rubber are comparable in spin, by dropping a ball on a moving platform with a rubber attached at 2 heights - 50cm and 188cm, which translate to ~3m/s and ~6m/s at impact, roughly the equivalent of a push shot. Simply put, a ball released from a robot doesn't have enough momentum to overcome the tack and the harder sponge.
 
This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Well-Known Member
Jul 2017
1,788
863
2,975
Scenario 1. Grippy rubber is better for returning spin.
Scenario 2. Tacky rubber is better for generating spin once the force gets past a certain threshold. Put another way, tacky rubber has higher spin potential. If a player does not hit hard enough, tacky rubber will spin less than grippy rubber.
This contradicts what people like Yogi and I have been saying.
Tacky rubbers grip better than non tacky rubbers at low impact speeds as when brushing. When brushing the impact is more tangential than normal. The ball "sticks" to the rubber like a fly on fly paper. It also requires extra force to for the ball to break free. Read the Tieffenbacher document.

Non tacky rubbers rely on the coefficient of friction. One the impact force is high enough, coefficient of friction stops the spin of the ball relative to the paddle except for what ever stretching the of top sheet occurs.

The rest of zeio's post is OK.

BTW, "normal" and "perpendicular" are similar. "Normal" is the 3 dimensional version of the 2 dimensional perpendicular. A line can be perpendicular to another line. A line can be perpendicular to a plane.
The face of the paddle is like a plane, a flat surface.

Also, I bought the first version of Apollo. It was extremely tacky. It wasn't very fast but it could grip a ball when brushing or looping balls off the bounce. The later versions were garbage.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tango K
This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Member
Jan 2020
488
316
1,248
Also on the strong heavy top spin ball, no matter how good you are, you'll have the tendency to contact thinner than you expect now and then. (Because the ball drops faster than you expect) Tacky surface allows you to give in more ACTIVE power, your own power. As I explained in my half-baked maths, Ball + Your Swing is now 1/2 * Ball + 2 * Your Swing. Therefore tacky users feel like it has more power. From the standpoint of physics, or Thanos (who can just flick the wrist at the precise moment of contact), that's not true. But from the standpoint of practicality, one might say so. And pro players, most of them are just practitioners. There is a clear language difference.

As a trade off, the tack kills some power, maybe a lot of power. There is nothing magical about it. So to offset for it, you naturally hit harder. So naturally you prefer harder, slightly dead-feel rubber. so on and so fort...
 
This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Member
Jan 2020
488
316
1,248
Or you don't even need to hit hard. You can play like Lin Gaoyuan or Xu Xin. Take the most out of controlled-spin with typical Chinese swings. Compare those to the like of Timo and Lin Yun Ju (who play seemingly different but somewhat similar games, quick in pace and spinny). But please do compare the 2 Lins in the long rally shots when they try to kill the ball and see who has to use more muscle.

Another example is the low spinny top spin of Ma Long. He swings so large and the ball doesn't go very far, but dips very very very low. He can make a very thin contact with that swing. 8/10 is probably because of his unique skill, but I guess 2/10 is because the tacky rubber gives him wider margin for error. Timo does low spinny stuff too. But see how careful he has to be. Too thin, the ball will slip and he loses control.
 
Last edited:
This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Member
Jun 2019
221
116
442
Scenario 1. Grippy rubber is better for returning spin.
This is wrong when written like that.
T05 is considered very grippy and is very sensitive to incoming spin.
With passive stroke it is one of the worst rubbers for returning spinny serves.

 
This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Member
Jan 2020
488
316
1,248
This is wrong when written like that.
T05 is considered very grippy and is very sensitive to incoming spin.
With passive stroke it is one of the worst rubbers for returning spinny serves.

That's what zeio means. It returns back the spin that comes to it.

 
This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Well-Known Member
Nov 2020
1,095
811
4,166
One day players A and B, playing tacky dead and non-tacky bouncy, change blades and after couple of hits politely change the bats back with a bow. Then each of them in spirit turns the head in disbelief: why the hell is this guy making his life so miserable for himself???

P.S. Hmm, or was it players Z and B ? ;-)
 
says ESN 42 hardness is my magic number
says ESN 42 hardness is my magic number
Well-Known Member
Mar 2021
2,545
2,649
6,016
This observation arose in me and I want to share this with fellow TT enthusiast:

1. I will use Donic Barucuda as a reference for grippy rubber as this is one rubber that I have most experience with; read: Euro Rubber.

2. When it comes to non-sticky but grippy rubber, I can loop or lift backspin ball even with a non full stroke or short stroke ( as some may term it ). I believe it is due to the assistance of power sponge or bouncy sponge that helps to bring the ball over the net. I can sometimes be lazy and still get away with it.

3. However, the downside to this is that although the ball is spinny, it is weak! There is little kick-effect. It may trouble lower skill player where if that opponent blocks that return, the ball will kick and fly out of the table. Unfortunately for higher skilled player, it does not trouble them at all and they can close the angle and block back with speed and gusto! ( active block ). Some can even counter-attack it.

4. When it comes to hard non power sponge tacky rubber: I am referencing to DHS H3. This rubber, due to its stickiness, can produce very spinny return with a lot of kick effect. One's opponent really need to close the bat angle a lot to prevent the ball from kicking out of the table.

5. I can feel that the ball is really spinny by looking at the trajectory and the bounce on the table.

6. The downside to it is in order to create that kind of return one needs to be in a good ready position all the time. This means having a great footwork and anticipation ( In-Pai ) to be in that kind of ready position to create that full swing. Any half hearted swing and the ball will surely goes into the net.

7. Full swing is too general a term to use, in fact, if I may add, to fully utilise the benefit of a tacky rubber, one's swing should behave more like a whipping motion and not just swing. Borrowing from the sport of boxing's parlance, it should fell like a jab and not a wild haymaker type of swing.

8. Now I come to an interesting observation: if I use the whipping motion on a Euro rubber, the ball goes high and overshoots the table. You need to swing and sort of "guide" the ball. In other words, you need to roll the ball across your rubber.

9. On the other hand, for tacky rubber especially the hard version, with the whipping motion, the ball is impacted more directly but perhaps due to the stickiness, the ball is extremely spinny and travels at a high speed with low arc,, the operative word hear is low arc. The trajectory is low and the ball seem to skim on the surface of the table with low bounce.

10. In summary: To activate the kick effect of sticky rubber, you need to impact it with a whipping force. If you fail to do this, the dead feeling rubber will make the ball goes into the net. On the other hand, when it comes to a power sponge euro rubber, one needs to swing and guide the ball across the rubber to create a spinny ball that has a higher arc compares to that of a sticky rubber's return. If you impact the euro rubber with a whipping motion, there is a tendency to overshoot the ball.

The above are my observations / perception. Does it corresponds to other players' own observation?
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: matzreenzi
says Shoo...nothing to see here. - zeio
says Shoo...nothing to see here. - zeio
Well-Known Member
Jan 2018
7,542
9,529
18,874
This contradicts what people like Yogi and I have been saying.
Tacky rubbers grip better than non tacky rubbers at low impact speeds as when brushing. When brushing the impact is more tangential than normal. The ball "sticks" to the rubber like a fly on fly paper. It also requires extra force to for the ball to break free. Read the Tieffenbacher document.

Non tacky rubbers rely on the coefficient of friction. One the impact force is high enough, coefficient of friction stops the spin of the ball relative to the paddle except for what ever stretching the of top sheet occurs.
Tsk, tsk...😒
There are so many opinions but no one has facts.
It is important that myths are not perpetuated. The forum should have useful facts instead of useless opinions.

It feels odd and gets old to have the omniscient engineer tell yours truly who has posted countless papers on table tennis topics over the years to keep reading the same document. Let's try something new.

Here is the fact. When it comes to the spin capacity of rubber, regardless of the type(tacky, grippy, shortpips, longpips...), the story is more complicated than just the coefficient of friction(CoF). The contact area and topsheet stretch play a larger role.


M. Varenberg et al. have conducted a study on the CoF of popular inverted tacky and grippy rubbers(Tackiness Drive, Tackiness Chop, Sriver L, 729 FX Super Soft) and non-inverted rubbers(Feint Soft, Clippa, 802, Grass D.TecS). Using a static test, a table tennis ball with different loads(1N, 2N, 3N, 5N) was pulled across the rubber surface facing upward horizontally at 3.5mm/s for a distance of 30mm. The results show that:
1. All rubbers, inverted and non-inverted, show a largely linear behavior in CoF with increasing load;
2. Stickiness appears to be related to surface roughness and tends to be lower for rougher surfaces;
3. Inverted rubbers, tacky or grippy, tend to have a greater difference in stickiness than CoF;
4. Non-inverted rubbers, shortpips or longpips, tend to have a greater difference in CoF than stickiness.

In another study by the same authors on the effect of humidity on the CoF of Feint Long III, Challenger Attack, Super Anti, and T05, using S40+, A40+ and G40+ balls, at 60% relative humidity(used in the previous paper), T05 and Sriver L show comparable CoF and stickiness.


JTTA has conducted a similar study on the CoF of various popular inverted tacky rubbers(Nittaku H3 and TG3, Butterfly Spinart...), grippy rubbers(T05, T64, Fastarc G-1...), and non-inverted shortpips(Flarestorm, Spectol, Moristo SP, Attack 8...) and longpips(Curl P-3 Soft, Feint Long III and Grass D.TecS).

In the static test, by pulling the rubber faced down horizontally atop 3 table tennis balls at 3 loads and velocities(140g@5m/s, 200g@7m/s, 240g@10m/s), they found that inverted rubbers exhibit 3 CoF patterns:
A. CoF stays relatively constant, like the dash sign -;
B. CoF decreases with increasing load and velocity, like the backward slash \;
C. CoF increases first but then decreases with increasing load and velocity, like the caret sign ^.

In the dynamic test, by shooting topspin and backspin balls on the rubber faced up horizontally at 2 spin rates(3000-4000rpm, 4000-5000rpm), they found that for both topspin and backspin balls:
1. Tacky rubbers tend to have a lower CoF than shortpips rubbers at both spin rates;
2. Tacky rubbers see a substantial increase in CoF at the higher spin rate;
3. Shortpips rubbers see only a moderate increase in CoF at the higher spin rate.

Then again, as I pointed out in my first post, the angular momentum of a spinning ball is just much lower than a swinging racket to overcome the tack and harder sponge, it's only natural for the CoF of tacky rubbers to be lower in that scenario. We need an experiment that tests with a swinging racket.


Sumitomo, the manufacturer behind the Mizuno Q series, has published experimental data on both inverted(tacky and grippy) and shortpips rubbers made with different formulas with a swinging racket. All topsheets were paired with the same sponge at 50° Asker C on a Senkoh Super 95 S, and swung at a stationary ball at 14m/s with a 60° racket angle. The friction force was measured by pulling 3 table tennis balls with a total load of 20N at 300mm/min on a rubber faced up horizontally. The data show that:
1. Despite the highest CoF, tacky topsheets made with different types of tackifier produced less spin than a grippy topsheet with a lower CoF made with practically the same formula.
2. With slightly different formulae, grippy topsheets with a substantially lower CoF could produce more spin than grippy topsheets with a higher CoF.
3. With slightly different formulae, shortpips with a substantially lower CoF could produce comparable spin as grippy topsheets with a higher CoF.


The reason many folks get the illusion that tacky rubber spins better than grippy rubber at lower impact force when brushing comes from the fact that the tack makes it easier for players to apply tangential force without slipping, which is harder to achieve with grippy rubber. What they don't realize is that the force direction is already different there. With tacky rubber, you are applying more force in the tangential direction than in the normal direction when brushing. In other words, you're trading speed for spin. With grippy rubber, you have to apply more force in the normal direction to bite the ball and get the topsheet to stretch or risk slipping, but on the flip side, you get more speed, and in turn you get a lower spin/speed ratio. To remedy that and to facilitate brushing, grippy rubber tends to have a softer topsheet than tacky rubber.

That's why tacky rubber is superior when playing close to the table and mid-distance because it kills the incoming speed and spin, yet offers the player a greater range/gradation(more gears) of outgoing speed and spin, and subsequently gives the player more "control" when transitioning from serve/receive to 3rd/5th/2nd/4th ball attack to the rally.
 
Last edited:
This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Well-Known Member
Jul 2017
1,788
863
2,975
It feels odd and gets old to have the omniscient engineer
And WTF have you done?

tell yours truly who has posted countless papers on table tennis topics over the years
lLke the one on reduced mass. on mytt I had to finally explain it.
Posting is not understanding nor does it guarantee the quality of the document.
People post bogus documents all the time. Many don't understand the problem they are trying to solve.

to keep reading the same document. Let's try something new.
There is nothing new. There is tangential friction, what you guys call "grippiness", that occurs when a normal force is applied to the rubber. The tangential frictional force = normal force x coefficient of friction. That is the definition. You can't refute this.
Tackiness doesn't require a normal force since it will stick to the paddle when hanging.
THAT IS THE DIFFERENCE. ARE YOU GOING TO ARGUE WITH ANY OF THAT?

Here is the fact. When it comes to the spin capacity of rubber, regardless of the type(tacky, grippy, shortpips, longpips...), the story is more complicated than just the coefficient of friction(CoF). The contact area and topsheet stretch play a larger role.
Yes, but THAT WASN'T THE QUESTION!

M. Varenberg et al. have conducted a study on the CoF of popular inverted tacky and grippy rubbers(Tackiness Drive, Tackiness Chop, Sriver L, 729 FX Super Soft) and non-inverted rubbers(Feint Soft, Clippa, 802, Grass D.TecS). Using a static test, a table tennis ball with different loads(1N, 2N, 3N, 5N) was pulled across the rubber surface facing upward horizontally at 3.5mm/s for a distance of 30mm.
I provided the procedure to test it. I said there needs to be 3 halves to keep the load stable. One ball will not do it.
Zeio, what difference does the distance make?
Do you are M. Varenberg KNOW THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN STATIC AND DYNAMIC FRICTION? I don't think so. If they did they wouldn't be so interested is pulling a load across the rubber. That would measure dynamic friction. They should have been measuring the force required to make the ball break free and start sliding. This is what is important to TT players. THIS PROVES MY POINT ABOVE THAT YOU DON'T UNDERSTAND WHAT YOUR ARE POSTING.

Zeio, over what range of forces did your sources test? Do you have any idea what the impact force is when a 20 m/s TT ball hits a 10 m/s paddle? You are allowed to make some assumptions within reason.

What is sad is that "tackiness" and "grippiness" will come up time after time for years. Anything that isn't on the front page of a forum is effectively lost.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Johnniedarko
This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Well-Known Member
Nov 2020
1,095
811
4,166
1. Despite the highest CoF, tacky topsheets made with different types of tackifier produced less spin than a grippy topsheet with a lower CoF made with practically the same formula.

Out of curiosity, approx. how much difference in % are we dealing with? If not available, no problem.

The reason many folks get the illusion that tacky rubber spins better than grippy rubber at lower impact force when brushing comes from the fact that the tack makes it easier for players to apply tangential force without slipping, which is harder to achieve with grippy rubber. What they don't realize is that the force direction is already different there. With tacky rubber, you are applying more force in the tangential direction than in the normal direction when brushing. In other words, you're trading speed for spin. With grippy rubber, you have to apply more force in the normal direction to bite the ball and get the topsheet to stretch or risk slipping, but on the flip side, you get more speed, and in turn you get a lower spin/speed ratio. To remedy that and to facilitate brushing, grippy rubber tends to have a softer topsheet than tacky rubber.

That's why tacky rubber is superior when playing close to the table and mid-distance because it kills the incoming speed and spin, yet offers the player a greater range/gradation(more gears) of outgoing speed and spin, and subsequently gives the player more "control" when transitioning from serve/receive to 3rd/5th/2nd/4th ball attack to the rally.

And as usual, thanks for the useful closing remarks. Similar like those in the paddle mass thread.
 
  • Like
Reactions: zeio
says Shoo...nothing to see here. - zeio
says Shoo...nothing to see here. - zeio
Well-Known Member
Jan 2018
7,542
9,529
18,874
Glad you find my posts helpful. The difference is significant.

Grippy topsheet 1
μ=1.25, ~89.5rps

Tacky topsheet 1
μ=1.75(+33.3%), ~80.2rps(-11%)

Tacky topsheet 2
μ=2.05(+48.5%), ~82.2rps(-8.5%)
 
Last edited:
says Fair Play first
says Fair Play first
Well-Known Member
Jan 2012
1,341
446
1,858

THE END OF TRASHY PIMPLES.
Fellow umpire doing experiments with a portable Heidon device that is able to tell us statical frictionality on the player's rubber. Pips-out rubbers with a low-friction below 0.500 μS ought to be excluded from the rest of an event..
 
This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Well-Known Member
Jul 2017
1,788
863
2,975
THE END OF TRASHY PIMPLES.
Fellow umpire doing experiments with a portable Heidon device that is able to tell us statical frictionality on the player's rubber. Pips-out rubbers with a low-friction below 0.500 μS ought to be excluded from the rest of an event..
That testing doesn't look like a TT rubber was involved. It is best to have hard but frictionless material in the chain ways of conveyor lines. It reduced energy costs and wear.

What is 0.5 μS? Friction should have units of force like Newtons or pounds-force. The coefficient of friction is unit less.
A tribometer measures sliding or dynamic friction. That isn't what we want. We want the static friction. Balls sliding on the paddle is not desired.
https://www.tribonet.org/tribometer/

BTW, the "sloppy" term that describes non-linear friction is "stick-slip" . The correct term is Stribeck friction
https://www.mathworks.com/help/physmod/simscape/ref/translationalfriction.html

The "rule" that pips can't be frictionless is arbitrary. There is frictionless anti. There is a long thread on this in the OOAK forum.
 
says Shoo...nothing to see here. - zeio
says Shoo...nothing to see here. - zeio
Well-Known Member
Jan 2018
7,542
9,529
18,874
The above are my observations / perception. Does it corresponds to other players' own observation?
Points 3/4 and 8/9 are what set tacky rubber apart from grippy rubber. German grippy rubber used to fare much worse in spin and firmness against Japanese grippy rubber before Baracuda/Hexer/Genius, ESN's imitation of Tenergy porous sponge, were released in 2009. The lack of firmness(weak support on hard shots) was still an issue but less bothering and was somewhat addressed around 2012, which I personally consider to be the last big jump for ESN.

In Chinese, they use the term 弧线贼/二跳贼 to describe the tricky trajectories/tricky kicks of tacky rubber versus 弧线正(ordinary trajectories) of grippy rubber.

https://www.ptt.cc/bbs/tabletennis/M.1409239066.A.8DF.html
T05明明就很正 球很轉不一定會賊 大陸皮賊多了
T05 is actually very ordinary. Very spinny ball isn't necessarily tricky. Chinese rubber is much more tricky.

In Japanese, they use the baseball term 癖球/癖玉/曲球/クセ球/くせ球(kusedama, junk ball/off-speed pitch) to describe the tricky shots of tacky rubber.

https://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/qa/question_detail/q11170677151
中国製強粘着性ラバーですね。
キョウヒョウ2シリーズとか。
3より2の方が回転重視なので癖玉です。
スレイバーは全く癖玉でないです。
オーソドックスな裏ソフトラバーですから。
Gotta be Chinese tacky rubber.
H2 series etc.
Compared to H3, H2 emphasizes more on spin, and so is tricky.
Sriver is absolutely not tricky.
It's an orthodox inverted rubber.

https://takkyu-navi.jp/rubber/detail/536
私が粘着ラバーに求めているモノは以下です。
・回転量
・適度なスピード
・クセ球(重い、沈む、伸びる)

ゴールデンタンゴはまさに求めていた粘着ラバーで、従来の粘着ラバーの回転量を維持しつつ弾みがUPしており、重くて沈むクセ球が出ます。

キョウヒョウ8では弾みがイマイチ、翔龍やキョウヒョウ3-50だと球質が軽くクセ球が出ないなど、今の粘着ラバーに不満・悩み
がある方は是非一度試してみることをオススメします。
Here's what I'm looking for in a tacky rubber:
・ Amount of rotation
・ Moderate speed
・ Tricky shot(heavy, sinking, stretching)

Golden tango is exactly what I look for, and the bounce is increased while maintaining the amount of rotation of traditional tacky rubber, and heavy and sinking tricky shots come out.

The bounce is not good with H8, and the shot quality is light and tricky shots do not come out with Rising Dragon and H3-50, those who are dissatisfied and worried about the current tacky rubbers should give it a try.
 
says Shoo...nothing to see here. - zeio
says Shoo...nothing to see here. - zeio
Well-Known Member
Jan 2018
7,542
9,529
18,874
In his video on the misconceptions of tacky rubber, Gucchy, a user of tacky rubber, and his sidekick Chaparrita, explain how many people equate tackiness with spin but tacky rubber doesn't necessarily spin more than tensioned rubber when you don't swing hard, and that the strength of tacky rubber lies in its wide range of shot quality, from no spin to heavy spin, from no bounce to huge bounce, as well as tricky shots, .

"Tacky vs grippy" is a rather common topic among Japanese bloggers.

https://tako-dairy.com/ガチ比較 粘着ラバーとテンションラバー /
基本的な性能はテンションラバーは弱い力において回転量は粘着ラバーよりも優れます。

なので私は始めたばかりの選手には、厚さ中のテンションラバーをお勧めしています。

しかしある程度インパクトを出せるようになってくると回転量は粘着ラバーが上回ります。

テンションラバーでは粘着ラバーと比較して、ラバー自体が軟らかいため、あるところを境に限界が見えてきます。

中国ラバーは硬く、ラバー自身の弾みは小さいので、弱い力では回転量が少なく、強い力では回転量が多くなる、線形的な性能を持っています。

粘着ラバーをフォアに使用している中国選手は、ジュニアオリンピックなどでは日本選手に負けることがありますが、力がついて成長するにつれてよりインパクトが強くなり、粘着ラバーの性能を引き出し、強い回転をかけることができ、立場が逆転します。

バックハンドにおいてはインパクトの力がフォアよりも弱いため、テンションラバーが選ばれることが多いです。
In basic performance, on weak force, tensioned rubber is superior to tacky rubber in the amount of rotation.

So I recommend medium-thick tensioned rubber to newcomers.

However, when it becomes possible to give an impact to some extent, the amount of rotation in tacky rubber excels.

Compared to tacky rubber, tensioned rubber itself is softer, so you can reach the limit at some point.

Since Chinese rubber is hard, the bounce is low, the amount of rotation is low upon weak force and the amount of rotation is great upon strong force, which gives it a linear performance.

Chinese players who use tacky rubber on the forehand may lose to Japanese players at the Youth Olympics, but as they grow stronger, they will have a stronger impact, drawing out the performance of tacky rubber and applying strong rotation, and the position is reversed.

On the backhand, the impact force is weaker than the forehand, so tensioned rubber is often selected.
 
Top