Which thickness of rubber would be a good fit for a beginner?

says I'm still learning Table Tennis.
says I'm still learning Table Tennis.
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My 17-year-old daughter is keen to learn table tennis, so I'm thinking to start off with a slight cheaply beginner setup. I'm considering using Vega Intro on a blade for beginners (have not decided yet) that is between flex and stiff in terms of elasticity.

The question is, which thickness should she start with?

Based on some forums I read, including TTD, it was suggested that beginners should start with thinner rubber, like below 2.0 mm.

But in this article by PingSunday, it says that new players who use thin rubber (below 2.0 mm) will improve slower than players who use maximum rubber (2.0 mm to max.). Using thin rubbers also form a bad habit.

Is this article reliable, or should I follow the suggestions on the forum?

Thank you!
 
It’s a good idea to start with a little thinner rubber. It does definitely not create bad habits. What is important is to have a setup that is not too fast. This can create bad habits. What happens then is that you get unsure and hold back.

A little bit too slow is better than a little bit too fast, and the rubber thickness matter less. Vega intro is an excellent beginner rubber and around 1.8-2.0mm would be great.

Cheers
L-zr
 
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I think that she should use a setup that allows her technique to improve the most. And there are cheap alternatives like Sanwei Accumulator S 5-ply wooden blade with light weight rubbers like 729 Focus III Snipe or Palio AK47 Blue or Yellow. All very linear and you don't have to spend a fortune. I don't think the thickness of the sponge is a problem, but these rubbers are very linear and will work very good for her (I think).
 
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I read a lot about this topic a few months ago when buying Xiom Vega Intro. Here are my takeaways:

1. 1.8 vs 2.0mm probably won't make much of a difference to a beginner in terms of feel or playability.
2. The Xiom Vega Intro 2.0 seems thinner than 2.0mm. A youtube channel I found measured the actual sponge thickness of the 2.0 and it came in at 1.8. You might be buying a 2.0 and getting a 1.8 anyway.
3. Xiom Vega Intro is not very durable and I had a few tears develop in mine after less than a month. Vega series in general has a poor reputation for durabiilty. The topsheet tears bothered me so much, I shelfed teh rubber. If I had to do it over again, I'd have bought Nittaku Factive for a beginner tensor.
 
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In my opinion just start with max thickness and adjust later based on the need.

She probably wouldn't even notice the difference
I agree, if you will transition to max later (assuming a standard double inverted play style), I don't see a reason to start with thinner sponge. (I started with thinner sponge and had to change technique later for max sponge). Even with max sponge, you can still choose proper blade and rubber type that will allow a good beginner setup that will allow confidence in building technique and consistency.

No matter the equipment however, the most important thing is to teach good technique!
 
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My 17-year-old daughter is keen to learn table tennis, so I'm thinking to start off with a slight cheaply beginner setup. I'm considering using Vega Intro on a blade for beginners (have not decided yet) that is between flex and stiff in terms of elasticity.

The question is, which thickness should she start with?

Based on some forums I read, including TTD, it was suggested that beginners should start with thinner rubber, like below 2.0 mm.

But in this article by PingSunday, it says that new players who use thin rubber (below 2.0 mm) will improve slower than players who use maximum rubber (2.0 mm to max.). Using thin rubbers also form a bad habit.

Is this article reliable, or should I follow the suggestions on the forum?

Thank you!

Suggestion:
1. Find a coach
2. Follow the coaches instructions

If you hired me.
I would suggest
Blade - Allround, wood 5ply
Rubbers - medium to medium soft sponge rubbers, in Max or 2.0mm
Rubber to focus more on control, so Max is ok
Faster rubbers would be 2.0mm

PingSunday - Of the thsouand posts/videos he has, have yet to see 1 video on his coaching. So not sure if he is just a youtuber/blogger, or actual coach (meaning, not sure how much is his original content, or "borrowed" content.
 
Get a max thickness rubber and a slow blade. Rubber determines spin, blade gives control (speed, feeling).
Speed is mostly blade, spin is mostly rubber and control is an inverse of speed.

Cheers
L-zr
 
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I have heard different opinions on that. Some say start thin, then get thicker as you improve, others say for modern spin game it is better to start thick.

I listened to a podcast with a high level German coach and he said kids should start out around 1.8mm, he said to thick isn't ideal to start but if you start with like 1.5 that would hurt development of a topspin game and could lead to too much blacking and hitting instead of looping.

I'm not sure what is right but around 1.7-1.9 is probably a good middle ground to start.
 
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I have heard different opinions on that. Some say start thin, then get thicker as you improve, others say for modern spin game it is better to start thick.

I listened to a podcast with a high level German coach and he said kids should start out around 1.8mm, he said to thick isn't ideal to start but if you start with like 1.5 that would hurt development of a topspin game and could lead to too much blacking and hitting instead of looping.

I'm not sure what is right but around 1.7-1.9 is probably a good middle ground to start.

From manufacturing point of view, say a basic spec would be: Max, 2.0mm, 1.8mm, etc
Max and 2.0mm would always be in stock
1.8mm not so much, and anything thinner, the MOQ is normally higher (hence many stores won't stock thinner)

This can give an idea on what the rubber makers see in terms of where most of the business come from.

However, same spec/data, I was told, most places, Max is being sold to players not good enough to use it, and would be better off if they used 2.0mm
 
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From manufacturing point of view, say a basic spec would be: Max, 2.0mm, 1.8mm, etc
Max and 2.0mm would always be in stock
1.8mm not so much, and anything thinner, the MOQ is normally higher (hence many stores won't stock thinner)

This can give an idea on what the rubber makers see in terms of where most of the business come from.

However, same spec/data, I was told, most places, Max is being sold to players not good enough to use it, and would be better off if they used 2.0mm
speaking of easy to use rubbers, Tony have you tried Big Dipper on backhand? Do you find it rather unforgiving as a BH rubber?

I love using it on FH, but it seems like it does require a higher technique for BH use.
 
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I've never found thinner rubbers to be significantly slower, they do seem to have less of an arc with the same looping motion. I can see why that may lead to more hitting than looping.

I don't really trust PingSunday's personal expertise, but the info he gathers is mostly accurate. For example, it's correct that nobody uses anything less than max or close to it in China, kids or otherwise.
 
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speaking of easy to use rubbers, Tony have you tried Big Dipper on backhand? Do you find it rather unforgiving as a BH rubber?

I love using it on FH, but it seems like it does require a higher technique for BH use.

Yes,
I'm almost 100% certain I was the first person in the western world to use Big Dipper
its world wide popularity may have a thing or 2 with my reviews and threads when it first came out. Stores in the west started to stock them few months after my review.

Big Dipper like many other Chinese brands that want to clone H3, has the speed aspect. Good for block and what not.
But the spin is not there at the top level. High performance shots ability on speed/spin is still behind H3 with a H3 topsheet on #22 blue sponge. But as a hybrid and its cost per performance ratio, its great.
Yinhe also have sponges hardness options, which makes it great (DHS actually adapted to offer a bigger range in recent years)

BTW. when BD first came out, it was orange sponge and then they introduced blue sponge (yellow sponge on the red).... blue sponge looks good :)

 
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I've never found thinner rubbers to be significantly slower, they do seem to have less of an arc with the same looping motion. I can see why that may lead to more hitting than looping.

I don't really trust PingSunday's personal expertise, but the info he gathers is mostly accurate. For example, it's correct that nobody uses anything less than max or close to it in China, kids or otherwise.

in China,
Kids at 7 years old train 30 hours+ a week

so with anything on the internet, it need to be relative to condition of the subject.
China would just start on hard tacky rubbers and drill the kids to be expects with it within the first month (120 hours)
 
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in China,
Kids at 7 years old train 30 hours+ a week

so with anything on the internet, it need to be relative to condition of the subject.
China would just start on hard tacky rubbers and drill the kids to be expects with it within the first month (120 hours)
Sure, but that means it could work, it'll just take you longer when you're not training that much. If you don't really care about losing games then you could theoretically advance quicker as you'd be forced to hit a more precise shot to land it on the table. I think it really depends on the player. Do you tense up and slow down your strokes when you keep missing, especially keep missing long? Or do you simply take it as motivation to improve more? If you're the former player then thicker rubbers, faster blades, etc. may hurt your development. If you'll keep whacking it away until you get good enough to land them consistently, then you may develop faster.

Personally, I think the advantage of thinner rubbers and all wood blades is that they have better feel. You get instant feedback on the quality of your shot. This is less of an issue with rubber thickness as you can just hit harder and you'll get that feedback, but with most composite blades you'll never get anywhere near the level of feedback you can get from an all wood blade.
 
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Sure, but that means it could work, it'll just take you longer when you're not training that much. If you don't really care about losing games then you could theoretically advance quicker as you'd be forced to hit a more precise shot to land it on the table. I think it really depends on the player.
Thats why I started my post about Coach and not about equipment first.
Its all about the training, coaching and adaption of equipment.

People tend to get too stuck with equipment only.

So yes, some can adapt, some might not.
 
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