Why would you use short pips?

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I think most do it because they have a weakness with the backhand, everyone starts with double inverted and some switch after some time.

But mima ito became pretty good with it:)
 
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Theoretically short pips with sponge is the best rubber there is. The shortest distance between two points is a straight line. So, if you can deliver the ball from your racket to the opponent’s side with maximum possible speed, you do not need any spin in tabletennis or in any racket sport. But al this Is pure theory and this is were spins (top & back) comes into the picture for 95% mere mortals to keep the ball on the table.
In the spin continuum, smooth inverted (boosted) rubbers sit on the top spin end & long pips sits on the back spin end. Antispin & short pips sit in the middle but manufacturers continue to confuse amateurs with all kinds of marketing gimmicks to sell rubbers.

Most players do not even understand historically why smooth spinny & then anti & then long pips were developed after the introduction of sponge in 1952 at Bombay (now Mumbai) , India World Championships (I have read it was introduced by a French player at 1951 World Championships but was not taken seriously till Satoh of Japan won the whole thing in Bombay) .

What this means is that
  1. Even at the pro or high amateur levels only about 5% players (at best) have what it takes to be able to use short pips with sponge & even that on their primary or strong side (usually forehand)
  2. Rest of the players (lower level amateurs) are not capable of using the short pips with sponge even on their primary side (usually forehand).

Bottomline is that at the amateur level anti & short pips with sponge (& medium pips to some extent) are what I would classify as “social rubbers” and I would also include most expensive European & Japanese & Indian & Korean rubbers. Why ? Because at the amateur levels most players who use short pips & anti because these players are afraid of using long pips as they fear social rejection by players who use spinny inverted both sides since about 70% of players use spinny inverted both sides and all the councils & committees of ITTF (& Similar groups of national affiliates of ITTF). They also use these expensive inverted rubbers because they wan to look cool as they crave social acceptance.

Short pips & anti are almost totally functionally useless & are just social rubbers at the amateur level especially on the weakside (usually backhand).

At the amateur level therefore, there are only two functionally valid rubber types
1. Long pips
2. Spinny inverted rubbers (only the non-social rubber type)

I am in the process of creating a detailed stroke by stroke analysis of all 5 rubber types to show why short pips is the absolute worst weakside rubber. I will post it later.

Anti is the second worst rubber type & it is also a social rubber.
Medium pips fall sort of right in the middle. They could be functionally useful as long as used as a transition pint to long pips but not a choice as a social rubber to win social acceptance & approval.

So when I see an amateur player using a spinny inverted social rubber on either strong or weak side or using an anti or short pips social rubber on their weak side, I sort of feel sorry for them for their wasting their time in tabletennis and or their vanity & pretentious nature.

What makes it even worse is the fact that many of these amateurs who use social rubbers (anti or short pips) on the weakside also live a fantasyland because they have convinced themselves that they can ALSO use these rubbers just because Mima Ito or Hou Yingchao etc are a so good at using them.

So what the hell is this strong side & weakside thing ? In tabletennis almost all players including pros have a strong side (usually forehand) & weak side (usually backhand). But the difference in consistency & playing style may be "almost" equal for pros but is quite unequal both consistencywise & especially style wise for amateurs but most amateurs don't understand this. This is how most amateurs end up using social rubbers because amateurs who delude themselves that they have equalforehands & backhands & think they can be twowinged loopers like top pros use spinny inverted social rubbers. Other amateurs who understand that their playing styles & consistency is very different on strong & weak sides end up using anti or short pips type social rubbers.

But the straight line thing only applies with no net, right? To hit the ball in a totally straight line the contact point would have to be significantly higher than the net, otherwise you need some curve to the ball flight and that either has to be Gravity or spin (or both). If it only is gravity you need to limit the speed to allow to give gravity enough time to make it fall.

 
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A good summary is in this link. Good short pips rubbers with sponge like the Nittaku Moristo SP or the Yinhe Uranus Pro still can impart good spin on the ball, so it is not as black and white as some of the posters make it sound.
Still, with inverted backhand one can put more spin on the ball compared to short pips and I feel I have better control over the ball compared to short pips (due to the higher arc).
The disadvantage of inverted backhand is that most people are very familiar with it, so the slight surprise effect of short pips is lost.
 
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after you have learned the fundementals as counter and stroke, if you are still better and more natural at hitting flat and smashing then it could be an alternative. Make a strength better. Not knowing how to loop is not a good reason.
 
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I've been using a short pips rubber on my weaker side for years and recently switched to inverted rubber. SP has advantages, but also many more serious disadvantages. In this video below I have explained the reasons for switching, talk about the transition process and compare the results before and after.
 
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What % of amateurs or even pros,are good enough to be better flat hitters on even their strong side (usually forehand) let alone their weak side?
Let me ask this in another way. Why do vast majority of players choose spinny inverted at least on one side ? I have already answered these questions

Inverted rubber is much safer since you can create an arc by generating spin and get more marginal for error. Need to move better and time better with short pimples since you ae not able to create the arc. Would say that inverted rubber is basically a better rubber and is a better option for the majority.

 
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...but are afraid to switch to long pips for fear of social rejection. This is why few of these players switch to short pips or anti because they incorrectly believe they will be accepted better in the world of two winged loopers. While two winged loopers many be a little more accepting of those who use short pips or anti instead of the supposedly horrible long pips on their weak side, the two-winged loopers will NEVER EVER accept these players as equal first class citizens of table tennis society.....

This has to be by far the biggest nonsense I've read in a long while on this (or any other) forum.

I don't know how the TT environment is in your area, but I sincerely hope this is not the general opinion of TT players in your area. In my area (south of Netherlands) people simply choose what they feel comfortable with and won't limit their choice based on so called "social acceptance".. In my 36 years of TT (competitive) experience, I have visited many clubs and met many players and I can assure you: we might not like the equipment of our opponent, but we surely respect each other. If you believe that people refrain from certain equipment choices because of this social acceptance, I think there is something seriously wrong in your TT environment.

On topic:
Like inverted rubbers, there are multiple types of short pips rubbers and each of them come with different characteristics. In general, short pips are used for close to and over the table offense playing style based on strong strokes (no spin) and hard pushes. Short pips eliminate the incoming spin (but do not revert it like long pips), so it's more easy to execute a smash or hard push.
Alfort is right on 1 thing: short pips (or any other pips/anti) are not a magic solution for someones weak side and it takes many hours of training to master the rubber correctly.

 
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Are you suggesting that everyone especially amateurs, should use spinny inverted on weak side as well just because it may be working for you ?

Of course not. I stated the reasons why I switched from the SP to the inverted and the problems I had in the game with the SP.


What % of players especially amateurs, do you think will have success using spinny inverted on weak side as well ?

I don't know what percentage, it certainly depends on the player, what suits him and what his abilities are.


Your video is not in English. So I cannot comment much ( I did notice that you posted results with short pips & invered but that doe snot really tell the fullstory I am sorry) .

At the beginning of the video I said that there are English subtitles and they just need to be turned on.


I also have to ask why you used short pips in the first place before switching to start with and chose to switch to inverted.
I also have to ask why you switched to spinny inverted and not to say anti or medium pips or long pips (I am not blaming you or accusing you ....just asking) I know every player is unique & I understand you may have your own reasons social or functional & I respect that.

As I said in the video... As you get older and slower, it's harder to play with SP, because the rubber can't help you if you don't position yourself well with your feet. So what suited me before, now doesn't suit me anymore.


If you are an amateur player (any level), it seems to me that you are a unique case where your weak side is almost as good as your strong side, in which case using inverted both sides is justified.

My backhand is significantly weaker than my forehand.


But again, I ask . What % of players ,especially amateurs, have strong side almost equal to weak side in terms of consistency and especially playing style etc ?

Why is it even important in the thread "Why would you use short pips?"

 
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What you need to remember is that chickens (short pips) can fly (spin or function on weakside) a little , doves (medium pips & anti) may fly (spin or function on weakside) higher but none of them can soar (spin or function on weakside) like eagles (long pips)

I have to say, I'm really struggling with this. Table Tennis is all about controlling and manipulating the kinetic energy of the table tennis ball. All the different types of rubber do this, but they each do it in different ways. I don't understand how you can set up an objective hierarchy like this; because each type of rubber is used in a different way for a different game style. You say that long pips "soar like an eagle" and short pips can only fly a little (like a chicken), but that statement is only correct if you're comparing them in the context of the game style for which long pips are designed. If you compared long pips and short-pips in the context of an aggressive attacking style, then clearly the short pips would be the "eagle".

Each rubber type needs to be evaluated in the context of the game style that it is designed for, and each rubber type always comes up trumps in its own style category. The only meta-analysis that you can then perform is to try and determine which game-style is the most effective, that would then allow you to say that one rubber type is better than the other for that particular game style.

 
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Because it's fun.

For a casual player this view is really underrepresented and underrated. I blame this in part because there is this prevailing view that using pips means your game is deficient in some way, and thus you need something extra to beat people.I use long pips because it's made the game far more interesting and fun to play for me.

 
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You are struggling with this because you are just comparing long pips and short pips from a general perspective with the extremely incorrect assumption that amateurs have eqaul forehand & backhand skills like most pros do . You are not looking at this issue from a strong side & weak side perspective, as is the case for most amateurs. Short pips is a strong side rubber for 99% players (who have the skille to use short pips that is, which is probably like 1% of total amateurs). Long pips is mostly a weakside rubber for 99% amateurs..

HTH..

No, I'm still calling BS on what was said...which was "What you need to remember is that chickens (short pips) can fly (spin or function on weakside) a little , doves (medium pips & anti) may fly (spin or function on weakside) higher but none of them can soar (spin or function on weakside) like eagles (long pips)".

I think this statement is incorrect even in the context where we accept that most amateurs do not have equal forehand and backhand skills. Even looking at it from a strong side & weak side perspective, there is nothing as far as I can see which means that LP's are inherently better than SP's on the backhand for amateur level players unless you make the prior (and from what I can see unfounded) assumption that amateurs are inherently better at chopping/defensive strokes on the backhand than they are at more attacking type strokes better suited to SP's. An amateur player that had a stronger forehand compared to their backhand, but who was still fundamentally an attack-minded player, would be better off with SP's on their BH than they would LP's, because the style of play that the SP's are designed for is a closer fit to the style of play the player is trying to employ. If they want to play defence on the BH and attack on the FH, however, then they're going to be better off with LP's on the BH. Like I said in my original response, you have to judge the strengths and weaknesses of the different rubber types in the context of the play-style they're designed for and the play-style being employed by the user.

 
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There are so many reasons why SPs are TOTALLY worthless as a weaksidde rubber. Well in fact let me ask you this > What % even the pros use SPs on the strongside.? SPs on the weakside is a joke & a soical rubber because one is afraid of being ridiculed & soically rejected by the superior two winged loopers.from the the tabletennis society.
Any amateur who thinks (s)he can use SPs just because Mima Ito or Hou Yingchao can use it, needs serious help.

I think you're talking nonsense. SP's are absolutely not worthless as a weaker-side rubber is they are being used by an attack-minded player...because you can attack better with SP's than you can LP's. I see plenty of amateur level players using inverted on the FH and SP's on the BH, and I know a few that play to a reasonably hight standard (top 200 UK ranking); they would not be able to play the same attacking style if they switched their SP's for LP's. I literally do not know any SP players that use SP's simply because they're scared of being ridiculed for using LP's. If this is your experience of Table Tennis then I feel sorry for you; you've clearly been involved with some horrible leagues and nasty players.

 
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