World Junior Championships (WJTTC) 2019 in Karat, Thailand

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No clear advantage for the Chinese men, or at least this particular trio. Togami and Uda have more experience in the senior circuit but mainly limited to the Doubles event... right?
 
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No clear advantage for the Chinese men, or at least this particular trio. Togami and Uda have more experience in the senior circuit but mainly limited to the Doubles event... right?

Yeah. Moreover, Togami and Uda will have lower ratings for not playing the junior circuit, which is why the Japanese team had to play the prelims. But the same applies to Xu Yingbin.

Other than Yingbin, this is a slightly younger Chinese squad and the Japanese had a good chance to pull it out.
 
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Yeah. Moreover, Togami and Uda will have lower ratings for not playing the junior circuit, which is why the Japanese team had to play the prelims. But the same applies to Xu Yingbin.

Other than Yingbin, this is a slightly younger Chinese squad and the Japanese had a good chance to pull it out.
Japanese team are about the same age as Chinese team. Uda and Togami are 18, while Sone is 16 and Shinozuka is 15. Liu Yebo and Xu Yingbin are 18, while both Xiang Peng and Zeng Beixun are 16. So actually the Chinese team is overall older than the Japanese team.
 
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Japanese team are about the same age as Chinese team. Uda and Togami are 18, while Sone is 16 and Shinozuka is 15. Liu Yebo and Xu Yingbin are 18, while both Xiang Peng and Zeng Beixun are 16. So actually the Chinese team is overall older than the Japanese team.

The matches were all close so it figures. Sone did a fantastic job vs Liu. I guess part of the reason the Chinese team seemed younger in my head was that they had a younger #2 while Japan puts its youth at #3. I also tend to forget how old Liu is.
 
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Surprised at how well Uda and Togami performed. Maybe I don't have to wait for Matsushima for the next big thing.

Generally I feel that they have slightly better serves and receives than their Chinese opponent, which could partially be due to their involvement in Doubles.
 
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not sure why Nagasaki decided to lose a game she was leading 2-0

I get that part but I don't see why the coach prioritized winning the first match over putting his best player in the power slot. You want your best player to play at least two matches if it goes beyond 3 and he has failed that.
 
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IDESAWA lost 2 matches that she could have won. But I think she fought well with her awkward style.

I don't understand why the JNT coach made IDESAWA the #2 player ? When was the last time a Chinese player lost against a Long Pips player ? KIHARA as #3 won rather comfortably her match. She should have been #2

Of course NAGASAKI the #1 is the one who really disappointed. She was 2-0 up but lost to SHI. She had some good results in the ITTF tours, but this defeat hurts. Didn't see the whole match but I'm pretty sure she choked a bit, its not just the Chinese player playing better.
 
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