Latest reviews

WE REVIEW TOM'S TABLE TENNIS BAT!
In this new video series we take a look at each of the TTD Team players equipment setup, why they use it and get an insight into each players game. In this first episode we've got Tom The Frog. Tom's setup is a STIGA Cybershape Carbon, with the DNA Hybrid Hard rubbers on both sides of his bat.

I Played Vs French Champion Simon Gauzy
Hey guys, recently I travelled to the Ochsenhausen Table Tennis Club in Germany to hang out with the 3x French Champion Simon Gauzy!

In this video, I did some training with Simon, he shows me how he does some of his INSANE trickery shots and we take a look at his racket setup, including the new blade he is using, the andro Synteliac VCI and Rasanter C53 rubbers.

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I Played Vs 5x World Champion Jorgen Persson
Pros
  • Grippy
  • High control
  • Spin
Cons
  • May find slow if coming from tensor rubbers
Hey guys, we’re joined by an absolute legend of the game, 5 x World Champion Jorgen Persson! Jorgen Persson won the singles event in 1991 and won the team event for Sweden alongside Jan Ove Waldner and others a staggering 4 times!

In this video, I do some training with Jorgen, he shows me how to do his famous backhand punch and we take a look at the rubbers he is using, the Donic Bluestar A1 on the Forehand and the Bluestar A2 on the backhand!

One member found this helpful.
TensorBackhand
TensorBackhand
You wrote "may find slow". Is it slow compared to other hybrid's like K3 or Dragon Grip? Or is it the same speed?
TIME
TIME
I use A2 on my FH. It's excellent for a mid level player like me.

Great video Dan. Love JP's backhand Cobra!
For Diode Pro in Blades
I Played Vs World's Best Defender Ruwen Filus
Pros
  • Solid
  • Stable
  • Feeling
Hey guys, in this video I'm joined by the World’s Best Defender Ruwen Filus! Ruwen has a highest world ranking of 18 and has won multiple medals with Team Germany including a silver medal at the World Championships!

In the video, I do some training with Ruwen, he teaches me how to defend and we take a look at the rubber he chops with… The Butterfly Feint Long 3. We also surprise him with the new Diode Pro blade to see how he gets on with it.

Butterfly Rozena isn't that good. Here's why
Pros
  • Fast
  • Soft
Cons
  • Low grip
Been playing for about seven years and I tried this rubber just to see butterfly products starting at a lower price range. I will say that I am disappointed with the spin the rubber generates. It is almost like an anti-spin rubber. I may also say that this is a good rubber for beginners. It is fast and soft.
Speed
8
Spin
5
Control
7.8
Fast wood blade with good touch
Pros
  • short game
  • chop blocks
  • counterspin
  • changing pace
  • compromise between loop and smash
  • unique feeling
Cons
  • non-linear response to power
I've played with this blade for a few sessions and I'm already liking it a lot. The thing I noticed right away is how controlled this blade is in the short game. I can receive serves and place them close to the net. I can also return powerful loops very softly. 10/10 in this regard, this blade is incredible in the short game.

This blade seems to be designed for the traditional Chinese style -- aggressive close-to-table play, with lots of chop blocks and flicks. It really excels in this style.

Remarkably, I think this blade is actually faster than a lot of carbon blades, especially when flicking and smacking the ball.

My setup for this blade was:
- Xuperman Powerplay-X FH
- DHS Hurricane 3 BH
- cpen style blade
weight: 210 grams

A bit about me: I've played mostly with 1-ply hinoki blades, and usually use the Nittaku Miyabi. I've also played extensively with the Yasaka Ma Lin Extra Offensive (MLEO) blade. I've also played with the Stiga Dynasty Carbon for a few months now. These are my points of reference when assessing the Rosewood NCT V.

Compared to Ma Lin Extra Offensive: The Rosewood feels halfway between the Ma Lin Extra Offensive and the Dynasty Carbon. Rosewood NCT V feels generally pretty similar to the Ma Lin Extra Offensive -- they have a similar ply construction, after all. The Rosewood has more "pop" than the MLEO -- it's a bit faster, has a higher throw angle, and it makes a cracking sound when you hit the ball. With Ma Lin Extra Offensive, you need to be very active in your blocking, but with Rosewood you can be much more passive, and you can take pace off of the ball more easily. With hard drives, the MLEO is much more forgiving if you don't use the correct racket angle. Rosewood is more forgiving than MLEO when looping far away from the table.

Compared to Dynasty Carbon: The Rosewood has a few characteristics of the Dynasty Carbon as well -- it engages heavily in response to topspin, which allows for good counterattacks, and it allows one to play powerful shots when swinging hard. I think the Rosewood lets you flick the ball faster than Dynasty Carbon, but it is slower and less-controlled on loops.

Compared to hinoki: this blade is much more controlled in the short game but much less controlled when looping far from the table. The feeling is completely different from hinoki.

Short game: This is the place where the Rosewood really shines, in my opinion. Rosewood allows for a more passive short game than Ma Lin Extra Offensive -- it lets you touch the ball with a loose wrist and still return a very spinny ball. With MLEO, you need to block actively to play well in the short game, but with Rosewood you can play passive blocks much more easily. With the Rosewood, I found it quite easy to return powerful loops very slowly and close to the net -- something which surprises my opponents.

Driving: When driving with this blade, keeping your wrist and elbow tense will make a very powerful shot -- almost like a carbon blade. I would say the drive is even faster than the Dynasty Carbon. The stiffness of your wrist really plays a big role in how you play with this blade. If your wrist is loose, you can touch the ball very softly. If your wrist is tense you can smack the ball very hard.

Looping: It seems to me like you have to be very careful when looping. You should have a loose wrist, and try to make very tangential brushing contact with the ball. If your wrist is even a little bit tense, you will smack the ball and it will not be so accurate. But if you can manage to stay relaxed, the loops are very nice and spinny. If you are careful, this blade will generate more spin than Dynasty Carbon. But it is less controlled than Dynasty Carbon -- a small error in technique will result in smacking the ball out of bounds. Furthermore, hitting hard will result in a higher throw angle, so you need to compensate for that as well.

Counterspin/counterattack: This is another really nice aspect of the blade. If you attack a spinny ball, you can press it down hard and make a great counterattack. This will activate the outer layers and make a "pop". Compared to other blades, you need to angle the Rosewood down quite a lot when counterattacking. This takes some time to get used to -- I hit a lot of balls off the table when counterattacking.

Flicking: The flicks are really nice, and it pairs well with the short game that this blade lets you play. I think this blade allows you to flick even faster than the Dynasty Carbon. When playing with this blade, I would try to keep the ball as close to the net as possible, and then flick the ball when my opponent made a small error. Playing a short game with flicking kill-shots is a good way to use this blade.

RPB: Rosewood has a very stable backhand, I think. I usually don't have a very accurate penhold backhand, but it felt very safe when playing with the Rosewood.

Penhold vs handshake: I think that this blade is only particularly good for penholders. Usually I get a cpen blade, and I play both penhold and shakehand with it. Usually, I find that the blade feels pretty similar with both grips. For the Rosewood, this was not the case -- when I tried playing handshake style, there was almost no feeling. I suspect that you need to have fingers in the middle of the paddle (like with a penhold grip) to take full advantage of the feeling and touch that this blade has. It seems like most of the feeling does not get transferred to the handle. But maybe this is different if you get a handshake-style version of this blade.
Speed
9.5
Control
8.8
Hardness
9.5
greenbeanmachine
greenbeanmachine
Update: now that I have had more time to "break in" the wood, this racket feels even more incredible. The soft touch is even better than it was at the beginning, and the flicks feel like they have some more power behind them. It feels like I "grab" the ball more when power-looping. Today while playing with it, I was frequently able to return powerful loops with a drop shot, making 2-3 bounces on the table. I have never felt another blade which can even compete with this one in the short game. It's so funny to suddenly change the pace of the game; my opponents got very confused.

I'm going to use Rosewood as my main blade for a few months. As of now, I like it even more than the Dynasty Carbon.
Best Backhand Rubber
Pros
  • High safe arc
  • Decent Speed
  • Amazing Spin
  • Grip
  • Control
  • Relatively spin insensitive
Cons
  • Not as tacky as H3
  • Price
  • Need to get used to its high arc and lower speeds if coming from tensors
I put a Dignics 09C on the back of my FZD ALC to pair with my H3 Neo Blue sponge (exact same setup as Fan himself lol). Backhand rubbers I have been searching for a long time for the perfect for me. D05 was too quick and spin sensitive for my liking, Fastarc P1 felt weird to me, hard to explain, K3 was good but durability sucked, and H3 was too slow for blocking and too low arc. 09C is everything I want in a BH rubber; the high arc might feel extreme to some but I really like it as I play more forward loops on my BH, it feels really safe and lands more often than not with adequate speed. Since I last used H3 Neo on my Bh, this 09C was a good speed for me. The spin generation for my topspin’s and open ups were too much for my buddy to handle. I struggle with the short game a lot, the 09C is excellent in this area with lots of control and not that spin sensitive at all. The only thing I don’t like is the price: $110 CAD i paid for this. But i’ve heard good things about durability so we shall see how much is value for money. Also it is not as tacky as H3 which some may not like, and not as fast and high arc as Tensors I have used like D05, so if you are coming from tensors be aware you will need a transition period. I would recommend this rubber to anyone of any level who is an attacker on either side, especially Bh. For FH I might twiddle to try out but I prefer H3 Blue for my FH as it provides more spin and control for my topspins, but I think many will love this on FH too!
Speed
7.5
Spin
9.2
Durability
8.5
Control
9.3
Great option for hybrid rubber; way better than Dignics 09c
Pros
  • spin
  • flick
  • consistency
  • directness
Cons
  • doesn't play well with stiff wrist
This is the Dignics 09c substitute that you have been looking for! This rubber can actually compete with Hurricane 3! This is a proper hybrid rubber with amazing playing qualities.

I tried this rubber on a Ma Lin Extra Offensive blade with Hurricane 3 on the other side, and I tried using it on both forehand and backhand. I liked it on both sides but it really shines as a backhand rubber -- the backhand flick is amazing.

I realize that technically this is not a hybrid rubber because it doesn't have a tacky topsheet. But it feels like a hybrid rubber because of the hard sponge. I usually play with extremely hard Chinese rubbers, and T05 Hard feels really natural to me. I've tried other hybrid rubbers, and the ones I like most are Rasanter C53 and Hybrid K3.

I've tried T05 and T05FX, and did not like either of them at all. So I think it's funny that I liked T05 Hard so much; it's truly a very different rubber. T05 and T05FX felt very uncontrollable to me -- if you do not hit with the exactly correct racket angle, your ball will not land on the table. T05 and T05FX are very sensitive to incoming spin, and playing the short game is very difficult. But T05 Hard does not have these issues; it suits the Chinese technique very well.

In particular, you can make slow loops with T05 Hard which you cannot do with the other versions of T05. You can do counterspins without having to worry about having exactly the correct angle. You can brush the ball very nicely if you play with a loose wrist. The short game is much more controlled (I think this is because the ball doesn't sink into the sponge as much, so there is less opportunity to be affected by spin). Despite being slower in the short game, this rubber is much more powerful than the other Tenergy rubbers at high speed. If you want to hit hard, you can really put a lot of energy into the ball. With the other T05 rubbers, I felt like I was bottoming out the rubber on medium-hard shots.

I've also tried Dignics 09c, which I did not like because it has a very high throw angle. T05 Hard still has a higher throw angle than Hurricane 3, but it's moderate and more manageable if you are used to Chinese rubbers. T05 Hard feels somewhat similar to Dignics 05, but even better (in my opinion) because it has a harder sponge.

The loop-drives with T05 Hard are very direct. It feels similar to the loop-drives you get with a Chinese rubber. Since T05 Hard is not tacky, you have to engage the rubber more to produce spin, especially at low speeds. At high speeds, I found that you can hit with similar technique to Hurricane 3 -- H3 grabs the ball more with tackiness, but T05H has a higher throw angle to make up for its lesser grip on the ball.

With T05 Hard, I found it easy to loop far from the table, and even from under the table. The backhand loop feels really good, in particular -- you can create a lot of spin with a short stroke. Hurricane 3 requires a longer stroke to create a comparable amount of spin. When using long strokes, H3 will create more spin, but T05 Hard can come close.

Disclaimer: to control the ball well with T05 Hard, you have to use a very loose wrist. This works well if you play with a head-heavy racket, so you can "throw" the racket at the ball instead of holding it tightly in your hand. I imagine this rubber will be harder to play with if your racket is lighter and you need to control it tightly with your wrist. Luckily, T05 Hard is pretty heavy and lends itself well to being "thrown". It pairs well with Hurricane 3 or Skyline 2, or any other heavy Chinese rubber. My setup ended up being ~205 grams.

Tenergy 05 Hard is still only around 39 degrees on the Chinese scale. I would like to see a Tenergy 05 Extra Hard one day, so they could make something comparable to Hurricane 3, 41 degrees. It would also be cool if they made a harder version of Dignics 05. Honestly, Butterfly should just come out with Hard versions of all of their rubbers.
Speed
9
Spin
9
Control
8.5
Hurricane 3 unboosted 37'
Pros
  • counterspin
  • serves
  • 3rd ball
Cons
  • requires good technique
If u have good technique then this rubber is amazing. I use unboosted and still get enough speed. Probably works best on a powerful carbon blade like long 5 or Viscaria.
Speed
7.9
Spin
9.8
Durability
9
Control
7.9
Decent rubber; weird characteristics; overpriced
Pros
  • spin generation
  • speed
  • jack of all trades
Cons
  • master of none
  • throw angle
  • price
  • overhyped
Allow me to start by saying that this is probably a really good rubber... for professionals. But for amateurs I think most of us are not good enough to take advantage of it. I wanted to see what the hype was about, so I bought a sheet of this rubber (for way too much money) and was not so impressed by the outcome. I've tried several other hybrid rubbers which feel better than this one, including: Tenergy 05 Hard, Rasanter C53, and Tibhar Hybrid K3. Even Dignics 05 feels better to me, and I mainly use Chinese rubbers.

I personally cannot get over how high the throw angle is. It makes it very hard to loop the ball from behind/under the table, which is where I hit a lot of shots. I suppose the high throw angle can be nice when flicking an underspin ball close to the table, but let's be realistic -- no one under a 2000 USATT rating does this in a way that would be benefitted by D09c. Fan Zhendong probably gets some benefit, though.

The sponge hardness is nice, and it allows you to play some very fast shots if you put in the effort. But you have to add some spin -- flat hitting is somewhat unpredictable.

Dignics 09c is very sensitive to incoming spin, so you need to be very precise with how you hit the ball.

D09c generates a lot of spin in a very short stroke. Usually (with Chinese rubbers for example) you need a bigger stroke to generate a sufficient amount of spin. But the high-end of spin with D09c is still less than Chinese rubbers. Same with high-end speed.

Unlike other hybrid rubbers (mentioned above), Dignics 09c is very heavy. Some people might like this but I think most will not. If you want a lighter rubber, K3 and Rasanter C53 are better options.

All in all, I cannot find too many faults with this rubber. It's a great rubber and lots of people use it for a reason. Personally I REALLY dislike the throw angle, and I think there are better options out there for less money. So I will give it 3 stars.
Speed
9
Spin
9
Control
6.5
greenbeanmachine
greenbeanmachine
I feel vindicated in my opinion after finding out that all these guys at TT11 tested Dignics 09c against other sticky/hybrid rubbers, and they all thought it was ass:

Really good feeling with amazing speed
Pros
  • speed
  • spin
  • touch
  • feeling
  • chop block
Cons
  • short game
  • flicks
Nittaku Miyabi has a lot of nice qualities. This was my main blade for a long time, and currently I am still using it for about half of my playing time. I have this blade in cpen, jpen, and handshake (FL) but mostly I use the cpen.

I started as a jpen player, and I really like the feeling of one-ply hinoki. If you're a jpen player who is interested in playing cpen, I would recommend this blade -- it's a great way to transition. I should warn you though: if you play with rubber on the backhand, the feeling of the wood will be significantly dampened. The one-ply hinoki doesn't feel as good as it does when you're playing jpen, but it still feels better than any other wood blade I've tried.

Over the time I've played with this blade, I've used:
FH: DHS Skyline 2, DHS Hurricane 3, Xuperman Powerplay-X
BH: DHS Skyline 2, DHS Hurricane 3

The combination I like best is Xuperman Powerplay-X FH, Skyline 2 BH.

Looping: Playing loops with this blade feels like spreading warm butter. The feeling on the ball is incredible, and the wood is soft enough to create a "catapult effect" while also having a long dwell time. I really enjoy looping far from the table. Recently I've tried two of Xu Xin's blades, but still the Miyabi is the one that feels best for playing the iconic "Xu Xin Style" loops and counterattacks from far behind the table.

Driving: The drives with 1-ply hinoki are a dream. Not as nice as when playing jpen, but still really nice. If the ball has any topspin on it, you can take it off the bounce and drive it fast to a hard-to-reach corner of the table.

Blocking: Miyabi is really good for drive-blocking and chop-blocking. Drive blocks must be very active; they can be extremely fast and inconvenient for the opponent. Chop blocks are really nice too: with a small motion of the wrist you can create sidespin, underspin, etc. Several players have asked if I have long pips (I don't) because I was able to block their topspin and return an underspin. It's very easy to create weird uncomfortable balls for your opponent with this blade. It works best if you take the ball directly after the bounce.

Counterspin/counterattack: If you have time to set up a full stroke and counterloop, the counterattack is wonderful. The contact time ensures that you have enough time to grab the ball and throw it in the direction that you want. However, if you are trying to counterattack with a drive stroke, this stroke becomes very unstable unless you take the ball directly off the bounce. For this reason, I tend to play far behind the table so that I have time to play counterloops with a full stroke. Playing close to the table with this blade seems very challenging to me.

Flicks: flicking is ok. It's not as good as Ma Lin Extra Offensive, or Stiga Rosewood. Instead of flat-hitting, it is best to add a bit of topspin to your flicks. This will improve stability.

Control: I would say that the Miyabi has exceptionally good control when playing loops far from the table. The blade is quite fast, and it has very good control when playing fast shots. HOWEVER, it is very difficult to touch the ball lightly and place it close to the net. A very interesting combination, indeed.

Short game: This is the part that I have the most trouble with. A better player than me could probably manage to return the ball softly, but I find it very difficult (especially with two rubbers on the bat, which dampens the feeling of the kiso hinoki). Typically my strategy with this blade is to avoid the short game -- I serve long and return long so we can get to the open rally as quickly as possible.

Fishing/lobbing: I have to add a section on this because I enjoy it so much. This blade is amazing for fishing and lobbing far away from the table. I do this quite frequently in matches, and wait for a good opportunity to counterloop -- something that the Miyabi is also very good at.

Size: Unfortunately I am a large person with big hands, so my fingers cover most of the bat when playing with a smaller blade. This blade is substantially bigger than other kiso hinoki cpen blades I have tried (including Darker Speed 90). I would have chosen Darker if they made bigger blades, but the quality of Miyabi is nearly as good as Darker so I am not too disappointed. The size is the primary reason I chose this blade, but it is not too much of a compromise on quality. If you like bigger blades, this is the one to get.

Durability: Don't bang this blade on the table and it will last a long time.
Speed
9.5
Control
8.8
Hardness
1
One member found this helpful.
Xiom 36.5 ALX
I'm a FH/BH aggressive looper, I play near the table with occasional

This blade has the speed and the spin of a Viscaria, maybe tiny less speed at same blade weight, but it has an awesome touch and feeling of the ball, something that Viscaria haven't.

I own and used several xiom blades: 36.5 ALXi, TMXi, TMXi Pro.
36.5 ALX, compared to those xiom blades, has better balance, better speed/weight ratio and better touch/feeling.

This blade is truly a gem, I dont get why it has no reviews, up to now, on this site.
Speed
9
Control
9.3
Hardness
8
Durability
9.5
2 members found this helpful.
Original Carbospeed
Pros
  • Fast
  • Decent Control
  • Good for powerlooping
Cons
  • Short serves are more difficult
I’m approximately rated USATT 2100 and I play offensive in both sides. I’m good at the spin game and my backhand is way better than my forehand. With my forehand I struggle in open play because of my weak footwork. When I don’t have the time I struggle to bring power into my loops. I rely on my arm too much to generate power.

Until now I have used mostly limba Outer blades. Good for the spin game but not so much for power with inadequate technique. I tried out many rubbers and blades but nothing really helped. Improving my technique did not really help either. I already play for more than 20 years and it’s not easy to change my acquired technique fundamentally.

Luckily for me I no longer need to change stuff. The donic carbospeed fixed it for me. I still have enough control and spin in my game and now I can generate power with my technique. My results in matches against players around my level improved instantly.
Carbon blade with wood feeling!
Pros
  • wood-like touch in short game
  • carbon-like speed in smashes
  • great spin capability
  • flicks
  • more feedback than other carbon blades
  • carbon activates on spinny balls (opportunity for counterattack)
Cons
  • less feedback than wood blades
  • carbon sometimes activates unexpectedly
  • carbon activates on spinny balls (chaotic)
Personally I think Xu Xin has amazing taste in equipment and this blade is no exception. If you like Skyline 2 rubber, Xuperman rubber, or the Stiga Rosewood blade, you will probably enjoy the Dynasty Carbon.

Stiga Dynasty Carbon is not exactly a "carbon" blade. The carbon layer is extremely thin, and for the most part this feels like a wood blade, much like Ma Lin Extra Offensive or Stiga Rosewood. The carbon gets activated when you hit the ball hard.

I have never seriously played with a carbon blade. I've tried a few of them before and never liked them. Dynasty Carbon is making me change my mind about carbon, and I think I will continue to play with it for at least a few months.

The blade that I usually use is a 1-ply hinoki wood. I have also used Ma Lin Extra Offensive for a long time. These blades are my point of comparison when evaluating the Dynasty Carbon.

For this review I use Skyline 2 blue sponge 41deg on the forehand, and Hurricane 3 40deg on the backhand. Both unboosted. I mostly play with the penhold grip (sometimes shakehand grip), and I use the cpen version of this blade.

I've played with this blade for about 6 weeks and I think it has improved my performance (in terms of being able to beat other players in a match). In fact, this blade felt so good the first time that I played a tournament with it the very next day!

Soft touch: I attribute my increased performance to the blade's soft touch in the serve-receive game -- this blade is phenomenal at giving you the ability to return serves accurately, and to place them shallow on the table to give your opponent trouble. It performs better than my 1-ply kiso hinoki blade in the short game. With soft touches, you have to be very deliberate in your stroke -- you have to add some aspect of power and followthrough, or else your shot will not go far enough. If you are making a short push, you need to make a complete slow pushing motion or a quick jab. It is not sufficient to just touch the ball with the racket and back off (like you can do with hinoki or Ma Lin Extra Offensive). If you touch the ball too softly, it will just die immediately on your side of the table. You need to be very careful and precise with your touch.

Smashing & fast loops: Like I said earlier, the carbon comes out when you are hitting the ball hard. I am still adjusting to this feeling but I find it to be better for some shots and worse for others. The throw angle is much higher than I am used to with all-wood blades, so I have to close the racket a bit more. Smashes are much easier to get past the opponent because of the speed of the carbon. At the same time, it is harder to do a brushing loop -- you have to be very precise in order to activate the wood+rubber without activating the carbon. I don't think I am precise enough to use this blade to its full potential.

Counterspin: This is the one part that I don't like. When your opponent gives you a heavy spin, it's very hard to counterloop it without activating the carbon. I feel that even if you touch a spinny ball lightly, the carbon layer will activate and make a sharp cracking sound. If you are not careful about the racket angle, the ball can go very high and fast. When trying to brush-loop for counterspin, it often activates the carbon and goes long. Instead, I am finding that I need to hit through the ball on the counterloop, activating the carbon and thus smashing the ball (rather than brushing it). I think I am not yet skilled/precise enough to use the blade to its full potential.
Edit, after more time playing with this blade: I have found a way to make good use of how spin activates the carbon with my backhand, making for a very fast flicking backhand counterattack. I still need to figure out how to do this on my forehand, which is a much larger, slower stroke than my backhand is.

Blocking: blocking is amazing, allowing you to return the ball short if you need to. But you need to have a soft touch -- if you press too hard on the ball you will activate the carbon.

Flicks: The flicks are also quite nice, as long as you have the technique. The carbon will be activated on a flick and you will hear a sharp cracking sound. I am personally very fond of the backhand flick, and will go for the backhand flick whenever the ball is close to the next. Banana flick works very well, even for a penholder. The forehand flick is nice as well, but not as good as the Ma Lin Extra Offensive. There is not as much feeling on the flicks as there is with Ma Lin Extra Offensive -- you just have to trust that you are making the right shot.

Slicing: I noticed that this blade gives a very stable slice shot. When I play handshake grip (not my usual grip) I can hit a lot of high-quality slices on both forehand and backhand. With the penhold grip I have managed to make some very good backhand slices (both RPB and TPB).

General feeling: This blade doesn't feel as good as hinoki (sad!) but despite a lack of feeling, it still does a great job of grabbing the ball and imparting spin. The contact time on hard shots is less, I think.

Sound: This is not such an important factor, but you will produce a sharp high-pitched cracking sound when you hit the ball hard, almost like you've broken the ball. It's very satisfying, especially when the ball goes on the table. It may also create an intimidation factor for your opponent :D

Compared to Ma Lin Extra Offensive: Generally the Dynasty Carbon feels similar to the Ma Lin Extra Offensive. The Dynasty Carbon has the same level of soft touch in the short game, and the flicks are similar as well. The main differences I can find are that the Dynasty Carbon gives less vibration feedback, has a much higher top-end speed, and allows a little bit more of a brushing loop when compared to the Ma Lin Extra Offensive.

Compared to 1-ply hinoki: The Dynasty Carbon does not have nearly as much feeling, and it is not nearly as satisfying to play with compared to 1-ply hinoki. Playing with 1-ply hinoki makes it very easy to make brushing loops; with the Dynasty Carbon it is much harder to brush and you have to be more precise. I think the Dynasty Carbon is superior in the short game because it is not so bouncy -- with hinoki is very hard to play a short game because of how soft and bouncy it is. The flicks and smashes with the Dynasty Carbon are much faster than 1-ply hinoki. I find it easier to play the Xu-Xin-style game (big-swing spinny loops far from the table) using a 1-ply hinoki. Playing with the Dynasty Carbon has made me move closer to the table and play more short game with aggressive flicking shots. This is not bad, but it is different. And I think it has also resulted in me becoming a better player.

Overall, this blade is an impressive piece of craftsmanship which allows the player to play a huge variety of shots. You can hit the ball very slow, and you can hit the ball very fast. I have never tried a blade whose range of speeds is as big as this one. However, because of the huge range, it requires a master of precision (like Xu Xin) to be able to play with it properly. Definitely not a blade for beginners.

I would like to make a note that the blade I received was in kind of poor condition when I got it. A lot of the wood was splintering, and the blade was very rough. Apparently STIGA is known for giving blades that aren't properly finished. I managed to sand and lacquer the blade (and I hope it will be ok after that) but I would expect better quality when paying $230 for a blade. Anyone who buys this blade should make sure to sand and lacquer it before using it.
Speed
9.5
Control
8.5
Hardness
10
2 members found this helpful.
greenbeanmachine
greenbeanmachine
Update: I want to add a comment about caring for this blade. You really need to sand and lacquer this blade (in that order). At least 2-3 layers. I did two thin layers of lacquer and still pulled off some chunks of wood when changing rubbers. The outer layers are very thin, so be very careful with them. Better to add too much lacquer than too little...
Good blade, tiny handle
Pros
  • Power selection
  • Feedback
  • Not too heavy or unbalanced
Cons
  • Handle too small even with small hands
I have this in FL with Turbo Orange for FH and Hammond Z2 for BH, both at 2.0. It was a solid step-up in pace for me, without becoming too fast and uncontrollable. The feedback from hitting my shots is good, the sweet spot seems pretty large as well, which definitely helps out since I'm far from being consistent enough to hit the optimal area most of the time.

My sole gripe is with the handle. The large handle version was out of stock, and I assumed - with my relatively small hands - that it wouldn't be that much of an issue for me, but it was. I wasn't sure what exactly felt wrong at first, but when I realised it, it was pretty clear - the handle size made transitions between FH and BH kind of awkward. So while hitting from either side was great, switching - not so much. I added grip tape to make it thicker, and it did help a bit. I would probably give the large handle variant all five stars, though.
Speed
7
Control
8.7
Hardness
7
Durability
10
Great rubber for first custom racket
Pros
  • controllable
  • good spin
  • durable
Cons
  • speed is not amazing but still decent
My first custom racket is an applegren allplay with these rubbers. Its a very nice racket, good spin and so much control i can make any shot i want with no limitations. Its probably not loved by the better players because it doesnt have killer speed but i like it. For a #3600 ranked player from the amateur league in Romania(5100 active players) its great.
Speed
7.6
Spin
8.5
Durability
9.3
Control
9.5
Good Racket, but not for me
Pros
  • Excellent feedback, good speed, good control
Cons
  • below average durability and constricted play-style variation
This is a great blade for the price, but it demands particular rubbers to play as intended. I used several variants. It does provide good feedback, so it will be good for a wide range of play-levels. It works best with elastic Japanese rubbers. This blade doesn't fair well with sweat (more-so than typical).
Speed
7.9
Control
8.7
Hardness
7.9
Durability
6.9
Pros
  • Blade quality
  • Handle design
  • Control
  • Feeling
Cons
  • Heavy
Blade quality is excellent. The handle is a little cubic comparing to popular designs, slightly narrow yet a little thick. It is really good if you like it but some may understandably not if one is used to the design of other big brands. Would suggest getting the large handle version if one likes a filling grip. Weight leans on the heavy side plus it is rather head heavy, a point to consider especially for penhold version.

Medium speed overall. OFF-/OFF depending on rubber pairing. It is not a slow blade by itself but it can act as a relatively slower one. First speed is pretty good, second speed is average/slightly below average.

Control is excellent. Inner carbon layer activates in a linear fashion so there is no sudden jump in gears. The gear spectrum is quite wide, starting from very low to medium high+. It feels soft in low force range and has good backbone in high force range. There is always good support but the ball will not shoot out super fast in high gears. Vibration is quite low but feedback is clear and steady. Dwell time is pretty high and trajectory is medium.

During a game, I carelessly sliced very hard on the table edge while saving a short ball but the blade is only mildly damaged. The veneer received a tiny few mm crack (seen only when rubber was removed) and there is a vague mark on the side. I expected way severer damage but the layers surprisingly stayed sturdy. A personal point on durability here.

blade.jpg
Speed
8.2
Control
9.2
Hardness
8
Durability
9.5
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Not for beginners, but powerful rubber
Pros
  • Faster than Rakza 7
  • Lower arc than Rakza 7
Cons
  • Harder to control than Rakza 7
  • Harder to open up against backspin
TLDR; try this BH rubber for fun if you are intermediate/advanced with good footwork, otherwise it is not worth it.

Background: I have been training for around 1 year now (practice 2-3 times per week). I use an inner carbon fiber (mesh) blade called Gambler Fire Dragon Touch. Previously, I have used Rakza 7 2.0 mm and Palio CJ8000 on my backhand. The only reason I switched to Palio AK47 Red was because I was curious about the rubber and it was cheap.

Review: It is clearly faster than Rakza 7 on full body, aggressive shots and had a lower angled arc. However, it was very difficult for me to open up against backspin with this rubber, and it was just generally harder to have my shots land on the table during matches. Even during training, my shot accuracy was not as good when compared to using Rakza 7.

I am writing this review because I recently played against a recreational player after trying out the Palio AK47 Red for one month (at least 10 hrs of training). I was using my old rackets for fun, and I realized that my backhand was actually much more consistent using my older rackets that had Rakza 7, CJ8000, or Mark V. Today, I took off the Palio AK47 Red and glued an old Rakza 7 onto my current setup. I instantly had better shot consistency when I hit warm up balls against a robot after I switched.

I can imagine that players with better footwork and technique can hit high-powered shots more often, which is what the Palio AK47 excels at. However, for me, I do not always hit with good form and acceleration, so Palio AK47 felt inconsistent to me compared to Rakza 7 and CJ8000.

I cannot speak on typical durability, but the sponge does flake off on the edges within a few weeks. This does not affect performance. However, I could not re-use this rubber after taking it off my blade, because the sponge cracked and broke when I peeled it off my blade.
Speed
8
Spin
7
Durability
5
Control
5
L
Learning
Recently, I wrote this review. I am very happy that I switched back to my Rakza 7, I have regained confidence with my stroke and have already improved my bh loop with my informal coach. Maybe in a few months, I will be ready for the AK47 Red. Until then, I am sticking with Rakza 7.
Classic Inner Carbon Blade with a fantastic feeling
Pros
  • high control
  • medium speed
  • good feeling
  • very high processing
This is a classic blade! Medium speed with power for enough offensive blade. Very good feeling and a little bit of vibration. The feeling of the blade is not to hard.
Speed
8.5
Control
9
Hardness
7
Durability
9.6
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