Andro rasanter c series

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I’m still not too sure whether I want to keep using it in matches, but I do want to keep training with it. It helped me understand my strokes better, and I found myself playing much better with Hurricane after training with c53/c48. I do however really like the r48 on my BH, feels solid in practice and also in games as well, but I’ve got a few more rubbers to test. The main reason I got r48 is it has a green top sheet option, the other ones I got coming are Joola dynaryz acc in purple, Victas v15 extra in blue, and Gewo nexxus pro 48 in green as well. We shall see which of them plays better.

That’s interesting, given the different stroke/bat angle required, don’t you find transitioning between H3 and C48/53 a challenge to consistency?

 
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That’s interesting, given the different stroke/bat angle required, don’t you find transitioning between H3 and C48/53 a challenge to consistency?

Actually the first transition from H3 to C48/C53 was a little challenging, but after switching back and forth for a couple times it felt really good, feels like the difference of the two rubbers have sharpened my sensitivity to the ball. The only part I need to really adjust are the serves, especially the really short ghost serves I like to do 😂 And like I mentioned before, during match play C53 is still a bit hard to control for me, so I've given up on using it for games, at least for now.

 
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Actually the first transition from H3 to C48/C53 was a little challenging, but after switching back and forth for a couple times it felt really good, feels like the difference of the two rubbers have sharpened my sensitivity to the ball. The only part I need to really adjust are the serves, especially the really short ghost serves I like to do 😂 And like I mentioned before, during match play C53 is still a bit hard to control for me, so I've given up on using it for games, at least for now.

Makes sense. I swapped it across to my Violin today along with the D05 on FH and it was chalk and cheese - I felt like the C48 behaved completely as expected and felt great. Back to 5 ply for me ;-)

 
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The more I play C48 I think it plays quite similar to D80 that I have on my other blade. D80 a little harder and less bouncy, but to me they seem of a similar ilk. Any others noticed this?

Not sure at this stage which I prefer - I get a little more bite and spin with D80 but like the energy and penetration of the C48.
 
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Has anybody here who has tried R/C53 compared it with 09C?

I really like 09c and everything I’m hearing about C53 (and less so R53) seems to indicate that, although it’s a little harder at 53, it may play a little softer but with some similar characteristics and maybe a bit less tackiness in the top sheet.
 
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What is the idea of the C series? I guess R is for rotation and spin, V is for speed and velocity.

C is for counter attack? How do you make a rubber specific to counter attack?
 
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What is the idea of the C series? I guess R is for rotation and spin, V is for speed and velocity.

C is for counter attack? How do you make a rubber specific to counter attack?

C is counter spin - what I can tell you is the C is slightly more tacky top sheet and slightly harder feeling then R so a little more hybrid in feel - they’re both great but I slightly prefer C.

 
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But what properties of C make it good for counterspin specifically?

I imagine that a rubber such as Dignics 64 is good for counterspin, because it may be less sensitive to incoming spin. You can block hard and fast and counter your opponent's loop.
 
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But what properties of C make it good for counterspin specifically?

I imagine that a rubber such as Dignics 64 is good for counterspin, because it may be less sensitive to incoming spin. You can block hard and fast and counter your opponent's loop.

I tried counter topspin with C48 and have to say it works like a charm. You reach out your arm and fold the forearm a little bit, the rubber will finish the rest for you. The ball comes back very linear and sharp. It is less sensitive to spin. The new Pip structure did a great job in absorbing incoming force and spin. That‘s why I find it as a H3Neo player a little bit difficult to lift the ball with C48 but with a correction of technique, it will work fine.

 
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But what properties of C make it good for counterspin specifically?

I imagine that a rubber such as Dignics 64 is good for counterspin, because it may be less sensitive to incoming spin. You can block hard and fast and counter your opponent's loop.

I think a good counter spin rubber should be more spin sensitive so it can counter the incoming spin, not less spin sensitive. Just think about what anti-spin means, and you’ll understand. Also blocking doesn’t count as countering, unless it’s an active block, but most time when I think of countering it means you are looping the incoming loop. Just like attack and counter attack, clockwise and counterclockwise, it’s the same action but in a different direction of motion.

 
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I think a good counter spin rubber should be more spin sensitive so it can counter the incoming spin, not less spin sensitive. Just think about what anti-spin means, and you’ll understand. Also blocking doesn’t count as countering, unless it’s an active block, but most time when I think of countering it means you are looping the incoming loop. Just like attack and counter attack, clockwise and counterclockwise, it’s the same action but in a different direction of motion.

Ok that makes sense conceptually.

So how does it show up in the C series specifically? What makes a rubber good for counterlooping? Grippier surface? More tensored sponge? Stiffer topsheet?

 
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I think a good counter spin rubber should be more spin sensitive so it can counter the incoming spin, not less spin sensitive. Just think about what anti-spin means, and you’ll understand. Also blocking doesn’t count as countering, unless it’s an active block, but most time when I think of countering it means you are looping the incoming loop. Just like attack and counter attack, clockwise and counterclockwise, it’s the same action but in a different direction of motion.

I think you are right about the spin sensibility because my H3 also works perfectly with counter top spin

 
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Ok that makes sense conceptually.

So how does it show up in the C series specifically? What makes a rubber good for counterlooping? Grippier surface? More tensored sponge? Stiffer topsheet?

For the C series, it has a slightly tacky top sheet, it's grippier than the R series, and when playing with it it feels a littler harder too, but I don't know specifically whether it's the top sheet that's stiffer, or the sponge being harder, or the pimple structure makes it feels harder.

 
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What would make me very cautious about the Rasanter C series (and any andro rubber for that matter) is the obvious curl they have out of the pack. It is super obvious they are factory boosted. The R53 is a pretty fantastic rubber out of the pack too for about 2 months. Then it turns really lifeless. They shrink so much it's disgusting. So unless you can afford to change your rubbers ~2-3 months time I would be cautious.

I would have more faith in the V>20 from Victas, their V>15 doesn't have the issues Rasanter has so I would trust them to sell rubbers that doesn't rely on boosting.
 
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Then it turns really lifeless. They shrink so much it's disgusting.
It´s interesting how different the experiences are. I get all my andro R53 and R48 (before that R47) handed down by someone who I don´t see very often, so the rubbers have been off the blade for months some time. I´ve sometimes noticed some shrinking, but never of any serious kind.

Technologically, the "speed glue effect" as they used to call it is based on some sort of chemical treatment at the factory, so perhaps your rubbers have had a bit too much of that which would probably result in more excessive shrinking, like an overdose of booster or speed glue.

However, as the Victas rubbers are from the same factory I wouldn´t see how they wouldn´t have the same techological basis, i.e. "factory tuning". What sets them apart is that all the Rasanter have the Energy Cell sponge, but why that would be a reason for different reaction/behaviour I don´t see.
 
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I would call it a bit severe. Rasanter is not the only one like this tho, MXP, Joola Rhyzer was pretty much the same deal.

However, as the Victas rubbers are from the same factory I wouldn´t see how they wouldn´t have the same techological basis, i.e. "factory tuning".

It's pretty simple, Victas doesn't ask such chemicals to be used. The Victas V15 has a very different sponge to any other, it's very rubbery, the material kind of reminds me of pencil eraser. I haven't felt such type of sponge in any other ESN sheet. I have no idea if the V20 is boosted or not, I'm just saying I would trust Victas more based on their past offerings.

I can imagine the C53 or C48 are more impressive when they are fresh than a V20, as the R53 was really impressive too, just died off quite horribly.
The C53 sponge seems to have even more pores than in the R53.
 
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I will second what Zwill has said, I don't have experience with the newer 48/53 rubbers, but I have glued a lot of rubber for people over the past few years, and never seen anything shrink like r42 or r50. Never seen anything like it from Donic/Butterfly/Gewo/Yasaka rubbers. Yasaka Rakza Z/X and Gewo El Super-Select specifically have a very "rubbery" feel like Zwill describes, and I have re-glued sheets of Rakza Z many times without trouble or shrinkage, even after 6 months.

 
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Why dont people just cut the rubber larger than normal?

Because it's hard to cut the same all around if cutting larger than the blade, you'll have to judge by eye rather than following a solid curve. Also, larger rubber is easy to get caught on the table when pushing, which will lead to the rubber lifting off from the blade surface. You may argue about protecting the edge, but the edge isn't that important. My friend who was a provincial player still uses a viscaria from 10 years ago, the edge are full of ding and the fibers are even delaminating a little here and there. Plus it adds weight, so all in all, not a lot of reason to cut the rubber larger.

 
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