Next step to improve: flicking the serve return

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I think the next step to improve for me would be to get better at flicking the serve return. I'm really bad at this shot right now. I generally play the flick in a very safe manner. But it gives the opponent a good opportunity to attack. So I need to practice being more aggressive and hitting a higher quality flick return. I'm not good at doing this right now, as I make too many errors at the moment when I try to be more aggressive.

Its' really the dead-ball serve that gives me trouble. When the serve is underspin, I can just push it back. When it has topspin, I can kinda punch it back. But when its a no-spin dead ball, it requires me to be more active. My default is to do a safe flick return. Any advice on how I can do the flick return more aggressively?
 
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elbow to be lifted more upwards and then you can generate more power and swing from your forearm. Make sure your elbow is stable as this is then used as pivot point.
( addition to above information )
 
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No spin dead balls can be pushed short. Just contact the ball on the side with a 90 deg ish racket angle, and thrust forwards like a fencer. It'll be short.

I also like the sideswipe a lot if it is a dead ball. Easy to control and doesn't take a lot of energy.
 
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With aggressive serve receives, you need to involve body rotation and weight transfer. Although the table is in the way, you can still throw your upper body weight clockwise (for BH flicks/chiquita), and anticlockwise (for FH flicks).
 
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When you have the right timing, you can flick pretty much anything.

I think instead of flicking aggressively, think about varying your return to keep the opponent guessing. Like above, someone mentioned about push no spin back short. Then next ball, flick to the forehand wide. Next back push with spin deep to the elbow. Then next ball, flick to the backhand. Rinse and repeat. You will do just fine this way.
 
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For all short receive, be it a short receive, a Long backspin push , or banana flick or whatever, I think the number one thing to pay attention to is to go near the ball as quickly as possible. With the dominant leg forward , the elbow not far the body (ie not reaching ) and your head and eyes near your bat.

Then you must ABSOLUTELY make a small pause. Never swing while moving but make this little pause. That’s true whatever your shot selection. If you swing while moving you will lose control and mistime the ball.

Then if you’re early try to time the top of the bounce and do your flick. At first don’t go for power but try to be aware of your opponent and place the ball while prioritizing recovery.
Middle is a often a good placement. Cross court exposes you yo a counter with all the table open and straight is difficult and risky to aim.

If you’re late at getting to the ball then don’t flick. Don’t panic and do make the little pause to get stability. The ball will be lower than usual . try to push it long or scoop up the ball. Play it safe where the opponent doesn’t expect it.

Multiball is a good way to train for this
 
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I think the next step to improve for me would be to get better at flicking the serve return. I'm really bad at this shot right now. I generally play the flick in a very safe manner. But it gives the opponent a good opportunity to attack. So I need to practice being more aggressive and hitting a higher quality flick return. I'm not good at doing this right now, as I make too many errors at the moment when I try to be more aggressive.

Its' really the dead-ball serve that gives me trouble. When the serve is underspin, I can just push it back. When it has topspin, I can kinda punch it back. But when its a no-spin dead ball, it requires me to be more active. My default is to do a safe flick return. Any advice on how I can do the flick return more aggressively?
Great post, I'm also having problems with this today. It is much easier for me to receive serves that have different spin than a semi-long serve with no spin, especially to the center or right side of the table. Usually I try to quickly understand whether the ball flies off the table or not, if it flies out, then I attack, if the serve is clearly short, then there is no problem to take it briefly, but if the ball is controversial, this is where problems arise.
 
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Ive been asking mates to do little no spin serves to me and I practice flicking the return with some aggression. During practice it goes alright, but as soon as a game starts, i revert back to my safe flick return.

Im not sure the aggressive flick statistically works in my favor yet. I know that it reaults in more errors on my part, so im scared to go for it in a game.

How can I get better as a returner?
 
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Ive been asking mates to do little no spin serves to me and I practice flicking the return with some aggression. During practice it goes alright, but as soon as a game starts, i revert back to my safe flick return.

Im not sure the aggressive flick statistically works in my favor yet. I know that it reaults in more errors on my part, so im scared to go for it in a game.

How can I get better as a returner?
Keep on playing matches. And keep on playing to get better. Lose a few matches. Who cares? If you can beat them six months later, consistently, because you perfect your backhand flick return, why does it metter you lose to them today or tomorrow?

Right now, I have five blades of Gambler Blackout carbon with Hurricane in the FH side and various ESN on the BH side. Each match I use a different blade. My performance goes up and down. I am losing to some players I have never lost before but I don't really care. The more matches I play, the more I am getting more confident about what ESN rubbers will be good on my BH side.
 
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I think the next step to improve for me would be to get better at flicking the serve return. I'm really bad at this shot right now. I generally play the flick in a very safe manner. But it gives the opponent a good opportunity to attack. So I need to practice being more aggressive and hitting a higher quality flick return. I'm not good at doing this right now, as I make too many errors at the moment when I try to be more aggressive.

Its' really the dead-ball serve that gives me trouble. When the serve is underspin, I can just push it back. When it has topspin, I can kinda punch it back. But when its a no-spin dead ball, it requires me to be more active. My default is to do a safe flick return. Any advice on how I can do the flick return more aggressively?
Just watch Lin Yun-Ju for like 3 hours
 
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Guys on this topic, I have noticed a great result when taking backhand short serves with no rotation or with a little bottom rotation, if you try to hit the left side of the ball, that is, the side if you are right-handed. Raise the elbow, lower the brush down, the blade of the racket is perpendicular to the table and the direction of movement is parallel to the center line of the table, and at the end of the movement it is imperative to close. Try it, it works great not only from the left side of the table but also from the center and even from the right side of the table, only if you have legs like Zhang Jike :) It turns out much worse if you do the same on the top of the ball.
 
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Guys on this topic, I have noticed a great result when taking backhand short serves with no rotation or with a little bottom rotation, if you try to hit the left side of the ball, that is, the side if you are right-handed. Raise the elbow, lower the brush down, the blade of the racket is perpendicular to the table and the direction of movement is parallel to the center line of the table, and at the end of the movement it is imperative to close. Try it, it works great not only from the left side of the table but also from the center and even from the right side of the table, only if you have legs like Zhang Jike :) It turns out much worse if you do the same on the top of the ball.
Isn't that just the chiquita :)
 
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Probably, but I wanted to focus on the angle, this angle, well, or the place of contact on the ball is very important in this element and perhaps someone does not know or underestimate this moment
Yep, precision in which part of the ball to contact is extremely important in the chiquita.

For me underspin = left bottom, topspin = left top, no spin = left back. If it's from reverse serves then it's the same contact points just more to the left, if it's from standard pendulum I contact much less to the left or even right side of the ball sometimes.

Also very important to use your entire upper body to first lift the ball then press it down like a "mountain" as per WRM video descriptions. I only recently learnt about this upper body control but it has been extremely useful.

After that you want to add in the appropriate footwork to go in, and to recover to neutral after the chiquita. I'm still working on the latter tbh... Fml so much to learn and incorporate!
 
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Yep, precision in which part of the ball to contact is extremely important in the chiquita.

For me underspin = left bottom, topspin = left top, no spin = left back. If it's from reverse serves then it's the same contact points just more to the left, if it's from standard pendulum I contact much less to the left or even right side of the ball sometimes.

Also very important to use your entire upper body to first lift the ball then press it down like a "mountain" as per WRM video descriptions. I only recently learnt about this upper body control but it has been extremely useful.

After that you want to add in the appropriate footwork to go in, and to recover to neutral after the chiquita. I'm still working on the latter tbh... Fml so much to learn and incorporate!
Wouldn't it be so difficult for YOU to reset the link to this video WRM?
 
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