Wait for tackiness to wear off?

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Not sure, just feel like the talcum powder breaks through the tackiness but doesnt loosen up the topsheets/ponge
Well I tried rolling a new Nittaku ball on the topsheet, but its still just as tacky as ever.

I'm also not sure if the tackiness itself is what is causing the throw angle to be so low. But particularly with looping underspin, it always feels like the force from the underspin rotation is greater than the force from the upward loop. Maybe the tackiness causes the underspin rotation to be extra forceful?
 
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Well I tried rolling a new Nittaku ball on the topsheet, but its still just as tacky as ever.

I'm also not sure if the tackiness itself is what is causing the throw angle to be so low. But particularly with looping underspin, it always feels like the force from the underspin rotation is greater than the force from the upward loop. Maybe the tackiness causes the underspin rotation to be extra forceful?
negative ! the tackiness helps to overcome the incoming underspin and you can return the ball with massive topspin........................if you can 🤣
 
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The more tacky a rubber is, the more incoming underspin bites on the rubber, thus the more effort you have to put into looping underspin. However if you do loop it, then it results in an ultra spinny ball even more so than non tacky rubbers. It is a double edged sword in a sense. But it could also be an opportunity to upgrade your looping mechanism to be able to handle it.

I use Hurricane 8-80 which is also very tacky and had the same experience - looping all extreme underspin into the net until I upgraded my loop movement. But after the upgrade, my opponents are really afraid of this opening loop because it's so loaded with topspin that it's a nightmare to control for them.
 
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You seem to overlook the wonder of "immortal tacky rubber" as recently invented by Double Fish sciencific department.
They sacceeded in adopting the older Fisher.,'s USA Pahtent from 1934
The novelty rubber is reported to retain its inicial tackiness for years, with no visible surface abrasion.

Be happy.
 
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The more tacky a rubber is, the more incoming underspin bites on the rubber, thus the more effort you have to put into looping underspin. However if you do loop it, then it results in an ultra spinny ball even more so than non tacky rubbers. It is a double edged sword in a sense. But it could also be an opportunity to upgrade your looping mechanism to be able to handle it.

I use Hurricane 8-80 which is also very tacky and had the same experience - looping all extreme underspin into the net until I upgraded my loop movement. But after the upgrade, my opponents are really afraid of this opening loop because it's so loaded with topspin that it's a nightmare to control for them.
This answer I believe is consistent with my experience. The Sanwei Target is very very tacky, and it seems like the underspin downward force is very very heavy when I go to try to loop. When the ball is in front of me, its not too bad. But especially when the ball is slightly behind or slightly wide or deeper, then it becomes exponentially harder to loop.

But that's definitely not explaining everything about the low throw angle. Because even on topspin to topspin loops, the throw angle is low. So something about the rubber inherently makes it low throw.
 
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This answer I believe is consistent with my experience. The Sanwei Target is very very tacky, and it seems like the underspin downward force is very very heavy when I go to try to loop. When the ball is in front of me, its not too bad. But especially when the ball is slightly behind or slightly wide or deeper, then it becomes exponentially harder to loop.

But that's definitely not explaining everything about the low throw angle. Because even on topspin to topspin loops, the throw angle is low. So something about the rubber inherently makes it low throw.
It's the tackiness too, it makes the ball stick to the rubber which makes the rebound weaker thus making it "lower throw". It's the same effect for eg when you drop a ball on a very tacky rubber it doesn't bounce much...
 
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says Table tennis clown
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This answer I believe is consistent with my experience. The Sanwei Target is very very tacky, and it seems like the underspin downward force is very very heavy when I go to try to loop. When the ball is in front of me, its not too bad. But especially when the ball is slightly behind or slightly wide or deeper, then it becomes exponentially harder to loop.

But that's definitely not explaining everything about the low throw angle. Because even on topspin to topspin loops, the throw angle is low. So something about the rubber inherently makes it low throw.
well, the guy in the video puts a brand new sheet of rubber on the blade and then has no problems smacking the ball over the net. Of course the lower you let the ball drop the harder you have to work to lift it back up.
So the question is:" What has the guy in the video got that you do not have ???????""
 
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It's the tackiness too, it makes the ball stick to the rubber which makes the rebound weaker thus making it "lower throw". It's the same effect for eg when you drop a ball on a very tacky rubber it doesn't bounce much...
oh ok. I hope you are right. Maybe after a few weeks if the tackiness wears off, the rubber will become easier to use.

It's possible because I had a Sanwei Target Pro 3 that started out as terrible, and ended up as just mildly underperforming. I think this is partly because the tackiness wore off a little as well.
 
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well, the guy in the video puts a brand new sheet of rubber on the blade and then has no problems smacking the ball over the net. Of course the lower you let the ball drop the harder you have to work to lift it back up.
So the question is:" What has the guy in the video got that you do not have ???????""
probably the nice shirt
 
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Shouldn't the tackiness result in a higher throw as the ball adheres to and "climbs up" the rubber? Something like this video is demonstrating:

Maybe the topsheet is not compressing and "grabbing" the ball enough with your usual stroke, so it's just being slowed down by the tack?

I recently ran into this video where this Coach Meng talks about using a stroke that 'crushes' the rubber in order to get spin. He describes it as a pendulum motion (not like the serve). It's in Japanese but with subtitles on it's generally comprehensible.

For the past week or so I've been practicing this and have been getting some good results, so I was wondering whether other forum members would have any thoughts on this.
 
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.......... Of course the lower you let the ball drop the harder you have to work to lift it back up.....
In that context I must admit that taking the ball (chopped or not )earlier creates a very spinny , fast and low throw shot which seems to cause havoc among my opponents , If I wait for the ball to drop and then spin, they definitely have less problems to smash or counter. I speak exclusively for my H3 behavior
 
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The stickiness of the topsheet can be removed by lubricating it with a couple of drops of vaseline oil, but I usually do not do this procedure with new rubber. If sticky rubber doesn't play with the right amount of gain, nothing will fix it.
 
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Well I've resorted to rolling my forearm on the rubber to try to take off the tack with my dead skin cells and dust. I don't know if this really works or not.
Well this technique doesn't seem to work. As soon as I wipe the rubber with water, its instantly tacky again.
 
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Well this technique doesn't seem to work. As soon as I wipe the rubber with water, its instantly tacky again.
You’ll maybe not be pleased to hear that my I played a bit of the summer and the whole winter local league season with black STN on my forehand. It’s still tacky! I always clean with water and keep under plastic after use, probably play between 6 and 10 hours a week.
I like the tack, but if you don’t like tacky rubbers …
 
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You’ll maybe not be pleased to hear that my I played a bit of the summer and the whole winter local league season with black STN on my forehand. It’s still tacky! I always clean with water and keep under plastic after use, probably play between 6 and 10 hours a week.
I like the tack, but if you don’t like tacky rubbers …
Thanks for the fore-warning. Actually I do really like tacky rubbers, and I use them exclusively. But STN is I think tackier than I'm used to.

My 2 biggest issues with it are that 1) it is too sensitive to incoming underspin, which makes it hard to loop underspin 2) it throws too low, forcing you to change your stroke more upwards.

Don't you find these to be problematic for you?
 
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