Composition of Blades

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This list was extremely helpful to me back when I had the luxury of trying lots of blades and trying to figure out what made me like certain blades and not others.


It is important to note that it came from the Ooak Forum where they have continued to update it and add more blades when they get the composition.


The link to the thread in Ooak Forum is in the original post.


One thing to note is that there are many blades with the same exact ply construction that play differently, faster, slower, more dwell, less etc. This has to do with several things: how the wood is treated before lamination, how the wood is glued, thickness of the plies, special coatings like NCT, thickness of plies etc.


One thing that you become aware of though, a blade with a certain wood, even if it has a different speed or something, that wood will still have a similar feeling. Limba feels like Limba. Balsa feels like Balsa. Hinoki feels like Hinoki (although there are a lot of blades that use Cypress and call it Hinoki even though it is slightly different/related but not the same). There are also different grades of wood, especially with wood like Hinoki.


But, if you like the feel of one blade with a Koto outer ply and a Kiri, the chances are you will feel enough similarity in a different blade with the same wood.
 
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I am. I'm considering either Petr Korbel blade and the Andro Core cell OFF-. I am a Chinese looper. H3 will be on my FH and Andro Rasant will be on my BH. I am looking for not going much above 50 USD. Anyone tried these blades? Anyone have any other suggestions? I want OFF- or a little more than that. Thanks!

Don't know the Andro blade. May be good but I have not tried it. But the Petr Korbel is a good blade. Petr Korbel is an Off blade that is on the low side of Off. It is comparable to a Stiga Clipper. Clipper is a little crisper and a little heavier. Korbel is 5 plies Clipper is 7. I think the Clipper costs a little less but they are both excellent blades. I guess, one more thing, a lot of Chinese players use Clipper. I think they used to use that blade to train young prospects in China. More Chinese pros where I am use Clipper than all other blades combined.
 
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Very Nice!
Noticed this just now and read it came from Ooak hehe. (NB: Ooak has updated it quiet a bit since last time, are you going to add them over here?)
I made a similar thread concerning Material info, also taken from Ooak..
http://www.tabletennisdaily.co.uk/forum/showthread.php?9171-Wood-and-Composite-Types!

I have a couple to share aswell:
Hurricane Hao III: koto - ayous (horizontal) - fiber glass - ayous (horizontal) - koto.
And
Hurricane Long 3 - Limba - ayous - ayous - ayous - ayous - ayous - limba
 
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says Spin and more spin.
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Very Nice!
Noticed this just now and read it came from Ooak hehe. (NB: Ooak has updated it quiet a bit since last time, are you going to add them over here?)

I have figured that, referring to Ooak is enough, especially since this thread has been around for several years and only interests a few. On Ooak this kind of information generates much more interest. I know it helped me understand a lot more about blades. But not everybody is interested in the underlying details (plies, thickness, gluing process, aging process) that makes a blade tick.



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yeah sir carl...and i think they say this composite blade has wood feel likewise those with zylon fiber (ZLF)...a composite blade which feels like all wood...is that true?

Not sure. I do know that I have not really liked the Xiom blades I have tried. Also, that blade, Hyabusa, has Zephalium and CARBON. I am assuming that Zephalium is Xiom's material imitation of Zylon. May be better. May be same or worse. HOWEVER, the blade has CARBON, so it probably feels crisp and fast, but it probably does not have the best ball feel because of the Carbon blocking the ability to feel the ball. Stradavarius is the Xiom imitation of a TB ALC. This one looks like an imitation of the TB ZLC (not ZLF). The Stradavarius has much less feel and vibrancy than TB ALC. May be the same for Hyabusa. But I really don't know.

And some people may like the Xiom blades better than the Butterfly blades.

I don't really know. But I doubt it has feeling like a wood blade.

The ZLF blades from Butterfly have almost wood feeling because they have Zylon but no CARBON. The ZLC blades are really fast and have the feel of Carbon.


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I have figured that, referring to Ooak is enough, especially since this thread has been around for several years and only interests a few. On Ooak this kind of information generates much more interest. I know it helped me understand a lot more about blades. But not everybody is interested in the underlying details (plies, thickness, gluing process, aging process) that makes a blade tick.

Hmm, I found another page that actually has even more updates. though does not seem like they have updated from one another (with Ooak)
http://tabletennisonline.org/blades/blade-composition-list/
A pretty wide rande of blade information here too!
http://stervinou.net/ttbdb/index.php
 
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Butterfly Innerforce ALC: limba - limba - alc - ayous - alc - limba - limba. The HL 5 should be very similar perhaps limba - ayous - alc - ayous - alc - ayous - limba

Both w968 and w997 has the same composition with Hurricane long 5, right?
 
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There are a lot of blades with plies of carbon in them. I think the way you would make carbon different is by changing the thickness of the ply or by adding things to the layer of carbon like aryalite or zylon. I am not really an expert on this stuff but I think it is like with plies of wood. A thicker wood ply is faster than a thinner ply of the same wood. Carbon is a very light, hard substance. So it is often used to make a racket lighter and faster at the same time. Blade manufacturers like to say it makes the blade have a larger sweet spot. That might be because the carbon ply is man made and very consistent. There are variables with wood. You can have two pieces of the same wood, they can be the same thickness and they will not be quite the same, or in one piece of wood there might be a little bit of a dead spot two inches away from a spot that is the opposite of dead.

I believe the reason that things like aryalite or zylon are added to some carbon plies is that it makes the ply fast as a result of the carbon, but the aryalite or zylon on top of it makes it soft on the surface until the ball sinks deeper and hits the carbon, so that the ball will stay on the face of the racket for longer dwell time. This means that you have more control of the ball and more time on the racket to spin the ball but you keep the speed you get from the carbon as well. A carbon ply would always be somewhere in the racket. It would never be an outer ply.

The reason I do not love blades that are made with carbon, at least the ones I have felt, is that, the hardness of the carbon makes it harder for you to feel the ball while it is on the rubber. Even with blades like the Timo Boll ALC or Timo Boll ZLC (I have tried both) you do not feel the ball on the racket as well as with an all wood blade. Those blades (like Timo Boll Spirit as well) are amazing and I have never felt a carbon blade that is as good as some of those new technology blades that Butterfly is making. But, even though you have a ton of dwell time, a lot of control and they are pretty fast--an ideal speed for a blade--I still would rather all wood for myself because I can feel what I am doing with the ball a little better. I also like the idea of paying $30-$50 US for a blade rather than $100-$250. :)

But in playing with a setup, the most important thing is that it works for your game. The best way to find that out is to hit with as many different rackets as you can. I ask people I play with if I can feel their setup on a regular basis. After hitting with hundreds of different rackets, I know what I like and what makes my game better. I also know that there are some blades which are fast that I will hit with and think I love them, but then I will play a game with them and discover that they are only good for offensive attacking and not for short game, which ends up meaning you cannot launch your attacks against a player who knows how to keep you from attacking. In other words, they are great for just hitting, but not for playing matches.

Thanks for the explanation Carl, this is very helpful, as are all your posts!
 
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