Danilo Faso European Under13 champion game style

He is the current European under13 champion, n.2 under15 European rank, n.18 in the Italian rank. He has been playing table tennis since he was 4 years old.
This year, at the age of 13, he already finished second in two national Italian youth tournaments under 21. In the first tournament, he even defeated Andrea Puppo (1st category and Italy's No. 12), then lost in the final to Vallino (now No. 5 in Italy two months later). This time, he lost in the final in the seventh set to Cappuccio Marco Antonio (first category, now No. 19 in Italy because he plays in A1).

In A2, the second Italian league, with the team “Virtus Servigliano”, at the end of the first round, he had 13 matches won and 1 lost (against Massarelli), 40 sets won and 15 lost, a 92.8% win rate, the best in the group.

Faso's game is now much more solid, with an extremely solid backhand that's unplayable for any second-category player (italian players from n.13 to n.121) , an anticipated forehand, incredibly precise rallies, and a very solid block

Here his highlights of the last u21 tournament
 
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Thanks for your post.
Do you know more about his development?
How could he get that good besides starting at 4 years old?
Was there a specific club or training centrum he played in or has he had a private coach?
Are his parents his parents involved (ex-pros)?
 
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Thanks for your post.
Do you know more about his development?
How could he get that good besides starting at 4 years old?
Was there a specific club or training centrum he played in or has he had a private coach?
Are his parents his parents involved (ex-pros)?
Both parents are involved in table tennis. He trained for a long time in Montpellier, France, at the same center where the Lebrun brothers train. Now, he has returned to train in Italy and practices alongside the top Italian players at the national training center.
 
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I like this kid. He seems very a confident and intelligent player. Well rounded and modern game. Has serve variations as well.
There are many kids with good technique, especially in china, japan, korea, etc. but they play like programmed machines. This kid looks like he has a “brain”.
Not to say he’s the next big thing but Italia has a rare gem there.
 
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Both parents are involved in table tennis. He trained for a long time in Montpellier, France, at the same center where the Lebrun brothers train. Now, he has returned to train in Italy and practices alongside the top Italian players at the national training center.
Wow, impressive that he went to another country for a longer time to get better at TT (also that his parents supported that step). I hope that school has not been neglected during this time. Certainly not easy if you are not a native speaker if he went to school there.
 
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Faso easily won WTT Youth Contender UNDER15 in Linz
IMG_1420.jpeg
 
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He is the current European under13 champion, n.2 under15 European rank, n.18 in the Italian rank. He has been playing table tennis since he was 4 years old.
This year, at the age of 13, he already finished second in two national Italian youth tournaments under 21. In the first tournament, he even defeated Andrea Puppo (1st category and Italy's No. 12), then lost in the final to Vallino (now No. 5 in Italy two months later). This time, he lost in the final in the seventh set to Cappuccio Marco Antonio (first category, now No. 19 in Italy because he plays in A1).

In A2, the second Italian league, with the team “Virtus Servigliano”, at the end of the first round, he had 13 matches won and 1 lost (against Massarelli), 40 sets won and 15 lost, a 92.8% win rate, the best in the group.

Faso's game is now much more solid, with an extremely solid backhand that's unplayable for any second-category player (italian players from n.13 to n.121) , an anticipated forehand, incredibly precise rallies, and a very solid block

Here his highlights of the last u21 tournament
I really hate the way he looks back at his opponent and chos. I understand he is passionate but that is way too far, he needs to be humbled however talented he is.
 
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I really hate the way he looks back at his opponent and chos. I understand he is passionate but that is way too far, he needs to be humbled however talented he is.
No matter how unsportsmanship that is, it is vital to do something to annoy your opponent slightly in a tight match. Table tennis is an extremely mental sport and a strong mentality is as important as a strong forehand. Also it boosts your own confidence.
 
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I really hate the way he looks back at his opponent and chos. I understand he is passionate but that is way too far, he needs to be humbled however talented he is.
that tends to happen when there is no other kid that can challenge a very young player and the young player can take out adults.

i think there is pros and cons to this "over chooing"
personally, I can name more cons than pro.
ie, Italy isn't a tier 1 tt country, so beating senior Italian players while at a teenage year, won't push you to a top player in the world.
Secondly, when things don't go your way, then you not able to release your steam....
 
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No matter how unsportsmanship that is, it is vital to do something to annoy your opponent slightly in a tight match. Table tennis is an extremely mental sport and a strong mentality is as important as a strong forehand. Also it boosts your own confidence.
I understand, but as he is a rising star, he will probably have lots of oppurtunities in youth competitions or in the future, world competitions where he will go up against best of the best. If he uses that mentality, he will either humiliate himself, or it will end up in a ruwen filus racket throw.
 
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So how do we start our 5 yr old, if we want to go this kids route
The most important is that at least one of the parents to be a former professional player. The best kids in Spain are sons of players or coaches. All of them. The best one is a 10 yo kid whose both parents were professional TT players and are currently coaches. He is already playing the Spanish B league (Division de Honor) and with his 145cm is able to win semiprofessional and even professional players. I'll try to find any recent video of him playing.
 
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