SDC Handmade Blades

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Okoume is usually not considered an exotic wood, but this kind of flaming pattern is really hard to find. In terms of properties it's very similar to Limba. The blade has a soft feeling and tremendous feedback, a great weapon for controlled looping with medium / medium-soft rubbers. The handle is made with exotic woods: Zebrano, Wenge and Padauk.

Available FS.

- Okoume / Cypress / Kiri / Cypress / Okoume
- 85.3g
- 6.05mm
- 157x150mm
- STSQ (102x28.5x22.5mm)
- 1250Hz
- Balance: 2.4cm (Low)

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That pattern makes the grain look like it’s going the wrong way 😁

Cheers
L-zr

 
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The Butterfly JSH is a very popular defensive blade, but it was discontinued. I've had many requests for this composition, but until now I wasn't able to make it because it uses a particular combination of woods that are hard to find. Anybody who has used it knows that it's fast for a defensive blade, the only thing defensive about it is the large head size, and it delivers a solid, almost hard touch. People normally associate that hard touch with the outer ply, which is not true. Having worked, and removed the top ply of a JSH, I got to see what was inside. The top ply is in fact relatively soft, the "secret" is a thick Koto medial layer. For the outer ply on this one I chose American Chestnut, which is slightly softer than Limba.

Available FS.

- Chestnut / Koto / Ayous / Koto / Chestnut
- 98.0g
- 5.95mm
- 163x157mm
- ST (102x28.5x23mm)
- 1080Hz
- Balance: 3.4cm (Med)

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The Butterfly JSH is a very popular defensive blade, but it was discontinued. I've had many requests for this composition, but until now I wasn't able to make it because it uses a particular combination of woods that are hard to find. Anybody who has used it knows that it's fast for a defensive blade, the only thing defensive about it is the large head size, and it delivers a solid, almost hard touch. People normally associate that hard touch with the outer ply, which is not true. Having worked, and removed the top ply of a JSH, I got to see what was inside. The top ply is in fact relatively soft, the "secret" is a thick Koto medial layer. For the outer ply on this one I chose American Chestnut, which is slightly softer than Limba.

Available FS.

- Chestnut / Koto / Ayous / Koto / Chestnut
- 98.0g
- 5.95mm
- 163x157mm
- ST (102x28.5x23mm)
- 1080Hz
- Balance: 3.4cm (Med)

688-1.jpg


688-2.jpg


688-3.jpg

So good to look at this blade, I love the way the sideways cut Koto layer looks (also I have a blade with White Oak, which has a somewhat similar texture to American Chestnut, but it is much harder). I think that every 5 or 7 ply blade is special, which has harder 2nd or 3rd plies.
It would be also interesting to use Horse Chestnut instead of American Chestnut, as it is maybe a bit hard, but even less elastic than Am. Chestnut (even easier to flex).
 
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So good to look at this blade, I love the way the sideways cut Koto layer looks (also I have a blade with White Oak, which has a somewhat similar texture to American Chestnut, but it is much harder). I think that every 5 or 7 ply blade is special, which has harder 2nd or 3rd plies.
It would be also interesting to use Horse Chestnut instead of American Chestnut, as it is maybe a bit hard, but even less elastic than Am. Chestnut (even easier to flex).

It would be interesting, but what about the weight? This is already a 98g blade, if I use a heavier outer ply the weight will increase even more.
 
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It would be interesting, but what about the weight? This is already a 98g blade, if I use a heavier outer ply the weight will increase even more.
The chestnut outer plies do not seem to be too thick - based on a well regarded datasource, Horse Chestnut is only marginally heavier than American Chestnut (500 kg/m3 vs 480 kg/m3), so I guess, that the difference in weight would be within 2g even with this enlarged surface.
Back in a while I can remember you mentioning a sibling species to Limba called Framiré - and I also remember, that it had greater Janka hardness, but lesser modulus of elasticity - and it was mentioned, that it gives a crisper play feeling.
Now I know, that Horse Chestnut is not really a sibling species to American Chestnut 8other than by the name), but it caught my attention, that it is maybe a very commonly available wood, and has interesting physical specs (Janka hardness 3630N vs. 2400N, modulus of elasticity 7.15 GPa vs 8.48 GPa), and as you like to do experimental designs, I wondered if you can see something worthy trying about that.
 
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It would be interesting, but what about the weight? This is already a 98g blade, if I use a heavier outer ply the weight will increase even more.
Just curious do you get many requests for HL5/968 clones?

How much can you make one for and how close do you get in terms of flex and catapult rebound?
 
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The chestnut outer plies do not seem to be too thick - based on a well regarded datasource, Horse Chestnut is only marginally heavier than American Chestnut (500 kg/m3 vs 480 kg/m3), so I guess, that the difference in weight would be within 2g even with this enlarged surface.
Back in a while I can remember you mentioning a sibling species to Limba called Framiré - and I also remember, that it had greater Janka hardness, but lesser modulus of elasticity - and it was mentioned, that it gives a crisper play feeling.
Now I know, that Horse Chestnut is not really a sibling species to American Chestnut 8other than by the name), but it caught my attention, that it is maybe a very commonly available wood, and has interesting physical specs (Janka hardness 3630N vs. 2400N, modulus of elasticity 7.15 GPa vs 8.48 GPa), and as you like to do experimental designs, I wondered if you can see something worthy trying about that.

The Chestnut I used here was around 460 kg/m3, but yes, the difference would be 2-3g. I just think that 100g hits a psychological mark that most players are not comfortable with. Of course I could use a lighter core to compensate for that... I don't have any Horse Chestnut but it does sound interesting 🙂
 
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Just curious do you get many requests for HL5/968 clones?

How much can you make one for and how close do you get in terms of flex and catapult rebound?
I've made a few, including for forum members, and the feedback was good. I'm getting more and more requests for them, it seems that this composition is increasing in popularity.
 
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Different question, I assume you've tried a 45 degrees rotation of different fibers...
Is it possible to generalize how this affects the characteristics of a blade in comparison to 0 or 90 degrees?
Or does it depend on the fiber used?
 
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Different question, I assume you've tried a 45 degrees rotation of different fibers...
Is it possible to generalize how this affects the characteristics of a blade in comparison to 0 or 90 degrees?
Or does it depend on the fiber used?
Rotating fibers only works if the weave pattern is symmetrical in both directions. For a plain fabric this is always the case, such as textreme-carbon. With ZLC for example, it is really not advised, the fabric only has carbon in one direction and zylon in the other. If you rotate the fabric, you create asymmetries that can lead to the warping of the blade. For an AC fabric this is possible, because you have an equal ratio of carbon and aramid in both directions. What happens when you rotate the fabric is that you decrease the stiffness provided by the carbon along the two major axis (Y and X), but gain torsional stability. In other words, you change the shape of the sweetspot, but torsional stability doesn't really mean much in a TT blade, it's not like we're hitting the corners of the blade all the time. In reality the biggest difference is the increased flexibility (which generally translates into less speed) and a slightly different feel because vibrations also travel in a different manner.
 
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I've made a few, including for forum members, and the feedback was good. I'm getting more and more requests for them, it seems that this composition is increasing in popularity.
How much can you make it for? You mean the feedback was that it is very close to the DHS original in speed and flex?
 
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Yes, very close.

The price will depend on the handle design, you can check my prices here: https://www.sdcttblades.com/prices
So they say the 2nd gen w968 is faster than original 968 or HL5 while keeping the same composition.

If you were to try to do the same, what would you do differently to make the blade faster with the same composition?
 
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So they say the 2nd gen w968 is faster than original 968 or HL5 while keeping the same composition.

If you were to try to do the same, what would you do differently to make the blade faster with the same composition?

+1 for this question. I didn't have the courage to ask. If HL5 is cca 1290Hz and W968 is cca 1360Hz, with the same composition, would you achieve it by bigger thickness, or by other means?

It is really interesting, you know I have Vodak Horejsi ALC with the same composition. I really like it, but eventually I'll need a new one, I'm getting some damages, not urgent, but it will come. Honestly I'm not sure I need stiffer, but the whole theme is very interesting. I'm sorry if this is like asking you to tell secrets.
 
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DHS uses Aramid-Carbon on the HL5 and W968, not ALC. I've written this somewhere else, the composition on those blades isn't exactly the same, there is a fundamental difference between them. The commercial version of the HL5 uses (or used, it appears they may have changed this) what I call Ay-C. This particular type of fabric only has aramid in the vertical direction and carbon in the horizontal direction. The higher flexibility of aramid is responsible for the lower frequency reading. The W968 uses a plain A-C fabric, with an equal ratio of fibers in both directions. This gives it a bit more stiffness, but also more softness, and the frequency is usually in the lower 1300s Hz.

The new generation of W968 has a higher frequency, closer to 1400 Hz, which tells me they messed with the stiffness somehow. This can be done in a number of ways, but the most obvious one is the lamination process of the A-C layer. This is also something I often experiment with. I also see a small, but relevant difference in the plies, so it can be one of the two, or both.
 
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DHS uses Aramid-Carbon on the HL5 and W968, not ALC. I've written this somewhere else, the composition on those blades isn't exactly the same, there is a fundamental difference between them. The commercial version of the HL5 uses (or used, it appears they may have changed this) what I call Ay-C. This particular type of fabric only has aramid in the vertical direction and carbon in the horizontal direction. The higher flexibility of aramid is responsible for the lower frequency reading. The W968 uses a plain A-C fabric, with an equal ratio of fibers in both directions. This gives it a bit more stiffness, but also more softness, and the frequency is usually in the lower 1300s Hz.

The new generation of W968 has a higher frequency, closer to 1400 Hz, which tells me they messed with the stiffness somehow. This can be done in a number of ways, but the most obvious one is the lamination process of the A-C layer. This is also something I often experiment with. I also see a small, but relevant difference in the plies, so it can be one of the two, or both.
Interesting. why is Butterfly so popular among pros when it seems like DHS is more on top of their game.
 
says Addicted to Spin!
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DHS uses Aramid-Carbon on the HL5 and W968, not ALC. I've written this somewhere else, the composition on those blades isn't exactly the same, there is a fundamental difference between them. The commercial version of the HL5 uses (or used, it appears they may have changed this) what I call Ay-C. This particular type of fabric only has aramid in the vertical direction and carbon in the horizontal direction. The higher flexibility of aramid is responsible for the lower frequency reading. The W968 uses a plain A-C fabric, with an equal ratio of fibers in both directions. This gives it a bit more stiffness, but also more softness, and the frequency is usually in the lower 1300s Hz.

The new generation of W968 has a higher frequency, closer to 1400 Hz, which tells me they messed with the stiffness somehow. This can be done in a number of ways, but the most obvious one is the lamination process of the A-C layer. This is also something I often experiment with. I also see a small, but relevant difference in the plies, so it can be one of the two, or both.
Thanks for the explanation Sergio. I will have to order a W968 clone from you at some point.
 
says Addicted to Spin!
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Interesting. why is Butterfly so popular among pros when it seems like DHS is more on top of their game.
We're talking about professional grade blades selected for and by pros like the W968 and Viscaria Golden for exemple that go through an extreme selection process. This is creme of the crop quality. Many pros are sponsored by Butterfly and many of them get exactly what they want may it be a custom, exact specs, carefully selected... And they try several units before deciding on a couple. Butterfly can make exactly what a player wants just like DHS, it is just not accessible to us under $500-$1000. This is why we're lucky to have expert artisans like Sergio who can make top quality customs at an affordable price just as well as the top blade makers at BTY or DHS

Butterfly blades are on top of their game when it comes to commercial grades for the public, more so than many other brands including DHS. Nittaku is probably #1 in terms of quality for the public, the materials they use and the craftsmanship seems more artisanal and consistent, quality you can feel.
 
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