Back to Forum
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 33
  1. tomahawk11 is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    TTD Member 6 11
    T
    tomahawk11 is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    TTD Member 11 6

    User Info Menu


    Apr 2020
    Europe
    11
    6
    75
    Read 0 Reviews
    #1

    How do you learn to sidestep properly?

    I am really struggling with my footwork, and I feel like it is really holding me back. I am putting in a lot of hours practicing every week, almost every day, but somehow I haven't been able to crack this problem, even though I spend a lot of time working and thinking about how to fix it. If anyone has any idea on how to learn to properly sidestep, I would really appreciate it.

    The problem as I have identified it:
    • I move almost exclusively with my right foot, and the left on is just trailing behind
    • I have too much of my weight on my right foot, this doesn't allow me to push off with the left foot.
    • My glutes are weak, especially glute medius, and they seem to be the prime muscle in lateral movement
    • Somehow the inner sides of my thighs are trying to compensate

    What I have/am trying to do to fix it:
    • Daily hip mobility and stretching
    • Workout: hip hinges, glute bridges with glute band, sidesteps, clamshells, bodyweight squats, lying hip abduction
    • Trying to actively feel my left glute during TT play, trying to keep the left foot "planted" as to shift the balance more to the middle

    What I don't know:
    • Am I on the right path, or is there a more obvious way to tackle the problem?
    • How do I balance leg/glute workout with daily TT practise? Should I workout every day, before or after training? or should I do longer workouts instead and do it 3 days a week?

    I would normally post a video, but I only have with training partners in the shot, and I don't wish to expose them publicly. If anyone thinks they can help and would like to see footage of me, I can provide in PM.
    Any help or input would be highly appreciated.

  2. Lula is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Master TTD Member 1,490 1,779
    L
    Lula is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Master TTD Member 1,779 1,490

    User Info Menu


    Oct 2016
    Sweden
    1,779
    1,490
    4440
    Read 0 Reviews
    #2
    Have you identified the problem?
    - difficult to move to the right due to too much weight on the right foot?


    I think if this is the problem it is more about working with how to move, and not any muscle weakness if you are healthy in general. So i think you should start with footwork exercises only with the feet by the table side to side, then shadowplay, then some multiball and then some real exercises.

    Try to find some ways to make it easier to know how you stand?

    - Maybe try to use a mirror? i think you can see when you put to much weight on one leg by noticing that you lean with the torso to one side.

    - Would be cool to try to solve the problem with some kind of biofeedback, if you can have like scales under the left and right foot, or some other way to see how you put the pressure.

    . - Maybe try to overcompensate? my experience is that players need to overcompensate becuase everyone will move towars what they are use too.

    - try to film yourself? i try to loop more forward with backhand. When i think that i am aiming forward i am still actually looping upwards because i am usually aiming for the ceiling. So hard to just follow the feeling.

    Good luck


    The Following 2 Users Like Lula's Post:

    SamTheMan and UpSideDownCarl


  3. Dominikk85 is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Advanced TTD Member 141 324
    D
    Dominikk85 is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Advanced TTD Member 324 141

    User Info Menu


    Jul 2017
    Germany
    324
    141
    232
    Read 0 Reviews
    #3
    Maybe this drill can help

    The Following 3 Users Like Dominikk85's Post:

    Dr Evil, lodro and 1 other


  4. jddavid is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    This user has been banned. 11 59
    J
    jddavid is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    This user has been banned. 59 11

    User Info Menu


    Jan 2022
    United States
    59
    11
    0
    Read 0 Reviews
    #4
    What is your age, and level of athleticism, or physical ability? Are you over the hump (old), over weight and out of shape? If so to any of those questions, my advice is to start there in a way that is easiest on your joints, because over-doing it with some drill meant for kids could backfire with a sore knee (like I have) and wind up causing a drop in performance instead.

    So long as you stand with the proper posture, your footwork will improve by simply standing in one place and doing multiball that focuses on your crossover, because simply making tiny baby steps to position your body correctly between forehand and backhand, or even multiball that requires no steps at all will improve your footwork by strengthening your legs.

    I like to think of my joints as a limited resource that has a finite amount of motion before wearing out, so why not save all those big steps for an actual match?

  5. lodro is offline
    says TT-CLOWN, old git
     
    Elite TTD Member 371 1,005
    L
    lodro is offline
    says TT-CLOWN, old git
     
    Elite TTD Member 1,005 371

    User Info Menu

    #5
    go to Spain and watch the matadors side step the bulls in the bullfights. That'll learn ye 😂

    The Following User Likes lodro's Post:

    dajdosta


  6. lodro is offline
    says TT-CLOWN, old git
     
    Elite TTD Member 371 1,005
    L
    lodro is offline
    says TT-CLOWN, old git
     
    Elite TTD Member 1,005 371

    User Info Menu

    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Dominikk85
    Maybe this drill can help

    brilliant video thanks


  7. UpSideDownCarl is online now
    says I like to hit Heavy Topspin
     
    Super Moderator 16,511 15,080
    UpSideDownCarl's Avatar
    UpSideDownCarl is online now
    says I like to hit Heavy Topspin
     
    Super Moderator 15,080 16,511
    #7
    What Lula said is pretty comprehensive. It has pretty much all you need.


    Shadow strokes/footwork drills in front of a mirror can really help with getting the coordination for good footwork. But you do also have to have some means of practicing it at a table like in the video Dominikk posted.


    And jddavid has a point that, if there is something that would cause your joints to be at risk, it may be a question whose answer has diminishing returns. But if you are not too old and you are in good health, then the things you need to do to develop the footwork would be practicing the skills. Because, for someone in adequate physical condition, the movements are not so much the problem. The issue is that your body, your nervous system, does not know how to do the movements and the brain processing is not up to speed on knowing when and/or where you need to move to soon enough.The hardest part of that equation is actually the reading the scenario, brain processing and knowing where you need to move to a decent amount of time before the ball has crossed the net.


    So, it is not so easy to learn and takes a lot of different approaches to training those skills into your system.....into your muscle memory. Therefore, take note of everything Lula listed in his post. It is all in there.
    Last edited by UpSideDownCarl; 01-26-2022 at 01:41 AM.
    Setup 1: Blade by Nate: Vortex Spin Machine, FH Evolution MX-K, BH Evolution FX-P
    Setup 2: OSP Virtuoso Plus, FH Rasanter R 48, BH Rasanter R 48
    Spin is Everything

  8. antonymous is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    TTD Member 7 22
    A
    antonymous is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    TTD Member 22 7

    User Info Menu


    Apr 2021
    Russian Federation
    22
    7
    0
    Read 0 Reviews
    #8
    Try doing agility ladder drills. They are great for overall body coordination, which is your main point of struggle, if I got you right!
    Personally I found they really boost the speed of your legs. They, like, really activate them (in contrast to those drills which just make your muscles stronger).

  9. dajdosta is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Advanced TTD Member 111 221
    D
    dajdosta is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Advanced TTD Member 221 111

    User Info Menu


    Jun 2019
    Croatia
    221
    111
    100
    Read 0 Reviews
    #9
    Exercise that you can do at home


  10. antonymous is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    TTD Member 7 22
    A
    antonymous is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    TTD Member 22 7

    User Info Menu


    Apr 2021
    Russian Federation
    22
    7
    0
    Read 0 Reviews
    #10
    Also the weight of your body should be shifted forward, so your heels would be ready to lift off the floor. No matter how strong your muscles are, you just won't be quick enough without that. The agility ladder helps you understand that.

    UPDATE: Encountered a video about my point:
    Last edited by antonymous; 01-27-2022 at 06:22 AM.

  11. Lula is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Master TTD Member 1,490 1,779
    L
    Lula is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Master TTD Member 1,779 1,490

    User Info Menu


    Oct 2016
    Sweden
    1,779
    1,490
    4440
    Read 0 Reviews
    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by antonymous
    Also the weight of your body should be shifted forward, so your heels would be able not to touch the floor. No matter how strong your muscles are, you just won't be quick enough without that. The agility ladder helps you understand that.

    Agree. Skipping rope good aswell.


  12. vossi39 is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    TTD Member 55 54
    V
    vossi39 is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    TTD Member 54 55
    #12
    Best footwork drill is Falkenberg… And helps with with BH/FH transition…If it only wouldn’t be so exhausting 🤣

    The Following User Likes vossi39's Post:

    latej


  13. UpSideDownCarl is online now
    says I like to hit Heavy Topspin
     
    Super Moderator 16,511 15,080
    UpSideDownCarl's Avatar
    UpSideDownCarl is online now
    says I like to hit Heavy Topspin
     
    Super Moderator 15,080 16,511
    #13
    Quote Originally Posted by vossi39
    Best footwork drill is Falkenberg… And helps with with BH/FH transition…If it only wouldn’t be so exhausting 🤣
    In the end, all the footwork drills are important. If you don't know how to do a one step or a step around, I would say it would be worth learning those first before trying to perform the falkenberg. But, when you know the basics, it is a fine drill.

    To me it sounds like a two point drill using one step footwork would be a good place for OP to start. But in the end, you need to train all possible footwork drills.

    The Following User Likes UpSideDownCarl's Post:

    Ktandean

    Setup 1: Blade by Nate: Vortex Spin Machine, FH Evolution MX-K, BH Evolution FX-P
    Setup 2: OSP Virtuoso Plus, FH Rasanter R 48, BH Rasanter R 48
    Spin is Everything

  14. Ktandean is offline
    says Footwork is paramount
     
    TTD Member 35 69
    Ktandean's Avatar
    Ktandean is offline
    says Footwork is paramount
     
    TTD Member 69 35
    #14
    Everyone already made brilliant post(s) so if I may, I will just add a small tip from my own training experience.

    I also struggled with lateral movement - which isarguably the most important and frequently used movement in TT.
    My coach made me do multiple BH (random amount) before pinging it off to the far FH side which I was too slow to react/move to back then.

    I did shadow practice at home, read some materials about it and immediately know what I was doing wrong: I move left by moving left foot first, and move right by moving right foot first, which often threw me off balance and caused the recovery to my ready position very slow, or at best, sluggish. The 'correct' (better players may give input about this) way is the other way around: move LEFT by propelling (putting weight and launch off ground) your RIGHT foot, and vice versa.

    I found that (personally), propelling is easiest done by focusing the launch point from a designated part of your foot. In my case, I'm on my toes a lot (pun intended). If it sounds a tad bit dangerous, I guess heels can be used in exchange for better injury protection, but any part will do once you've programmed it into your muscle memory (which takes patience from lots of practice ofc 😀)

    Yesterday training session: coach gave me a similar exercise and I nailed it MUCH better. Not perfect yet, but I felt readier for every ball.
    (You can try something like 2-3x BH, far FH, middle FH, repeat).

    Just my two cents, hope it helps!



    The Following User Likes Ktandean's Post:

    UpSideDownCarl

    Spincerely yours,
    KT

  15. langel is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Master TTD Member 1,066 2,235
    L
    langel is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Master TTD Member 2,235 1,066
    #15
    Here we do a lot of side jumping around the hall walls. Teach your legs to always start with the opposite to the step direction, when you have to move to the right you start with the left leg and vice versa. In real match it may be difficult, so train it a lot with rhythmic drills on constant distance, one and the same wing, changing placement only. After that do the same with changing the wings. After that with unrhytmic temp. At the end the most difficult is with changing distances.

    The Following 2 Users Like langel's Post:

    fais and Ktandean


  16. Dominikk85 is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Advanced TTD Member 141 324
    D
    Dominikk85 is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Advanced TTD Member 324 141

    User Info Menu


    Jul 2017
    Germany
    324
    141
    232
    Read 0 Reviews
    #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Ktandean
    Everyone already made brilliant post(s) so if I may, I will just add a small tip from my own training experience.

    I also struggled with lateral movement - which isarguably the most important and frequently used movement in TT.
    My coach made me do multiple BH (random amount) before pinging it off to the far FH side which I was too slow to react/move to back then.

    I did shadow practice at home, read some materials about it and immediately know what I was doing wrong: I move left by moving left foot first, and move right by moving right foot first, which often threw me off balance and caused the recovery to my ready position very slow, or at best, sluggish. The 'correct' (better players may give input about this) way is the other way around: move LEFT by propelling (putting weight and launch off ground) your RIGHT foot, and vice versa.

    I found that (personally), propelling is easiest done by focusing the launch point from a designated part of your foot. In my case, I'm on my toes a lot (pun intended). If it sounds a tad bit dangerous, I guess heels can be used in exchange for better injury protection, but any part will do once you've programmed it into your muscle memory (which takes patience from lots of practice ofc 😀)

    Yesterday training session: coach gave me a similar exercise and I nailed it MUCH better. Not perfect yet, but I felt readier for every ball.
    (You can try something like 2-3x BH, far FH, middle FH, repeat).

    Just my two cents, hope it helps!

    Skater jumps can help to train that lateral push off.

    The Following User Likes Dominikk85's Post:

    Ktandean


  17. dajdosta is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Advanced TTD Member 111 221
    D
    dajdosta is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Advanced TTD Member 221 111

    User Info Menu


    Jun 2019
    Croatia
    221
    111
    100
    Read 0 Reviews
    #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Dominikk85

    Skater jumps can help to train that lateral push off.

    This guy got it all covered. See at 2:51

  18. UpSideDownCarl is online now
    says I like to hit Heavy Topspin
     
    Super Moderator 16,511 15,080
    UpSideDownCarl's Avatar
    UpSideDownCarl is online now
    says I like to hit Heavy Topspin
     
    Super Moderator 15,080 16,511
    #18
    In terms of strengthening exercises I think that information is covered in a lot of different ways already.

    I think it is important to understand two things:

    1) One of the things that makes footwork a challenge to learn in TT is the fact that you first have to learn how to coordinate the upper body and the lower body WHILE MOVING AND TAKING A STROKE. Why is this hard, the upper body and the lower body are working in synergy, but they are counterbalancing each other. They are not doing the same things at the same time. So, you can be strong and able to do all the movements separately. But you need to learn to coordinate what everything below the waste does with what everything above the waste does.

    2) Even when #1 is taken care of, you have to learn to read where the ball is going to move there. So, when you can do the footwork drills in shadow form, and then, you get good at doing the drills with multiball, when fed the ball and you know where the next ball will go, you will have to do this a lot, A Lot, A LOT, to make it so, in random play, like what happens in a match situation, where your opponent is trying to give you balls that are hard to return, you read the play and make the right movement. I can't over emphasize how getting from drills where you are developing the muscle memory, to convert that to the brain processing to read the play and plug in the correct muscle memory to make the movement to the ball when your opponent is trying to mess you up, takes a lot of work.

    So, if strength training is all that is needed, the subject is covered. But if, in your head, you know the right movement, and in drills where you know what is coming, you can perform the correct movement, but in match play you are still stepping only with one foot and reaching for the ball instead of doing the footwork to be in position, then strength training won't help you learn how to read the play and make the most efficient movement to the ball. You would need to go through step one above till your body knows the exercises, and step 2 above where you learn to practice the footwork drills with a live ball, to step 3 where you can do the footwork well enough in a random situation:

    So, moving towards this: although this is the most evil version of what I am talking about that I can imagine and ZJK is training the skill I am talking about at a pace that is notably faster than could ever happen in match play since the ball feeder is sending the next ball before ZJK's next shot lands on the table. But notice the random nature of the drill and how hard it is for ZJK to keep the footwork even though he mostly does:

    The Following User Likes UpSideDownCarl's Post:

    Ktandean

    Setup 1: Blade by Nate: Vortex Spin Machine, FH Evolution MX-K, BH Evolution FX-P
    Setup 2: OSP Virtuoso Plus, FH Rasanter R 48, BH Rasanter R 48
    Spin is Everything

  19. vossi39 is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    TTD Member 55 54
    V
    vossi39 is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    TTD Member 54 55
    #19
    Quote Originally Posted by UpSideDownCarl
    In the end, all the footwork drills are important. If you don't know how to do a one step or a step around, I would say it would be worth learning those first before trying to perform the falkenberg. But, when you know the basics, it is a fine drill.

    To me it sounds like a two point drill using one step footwork would be a good place for OP to start. But in the end, you need to train all possible footwork drills.
    If I look at my play (and certainly it is considered low level 😃) 90% of my footwork needed is covered by Falkenberg. I find this a perfect excercise to include in most training session to keep and extend your quickness and specifically combined with FH/BH transitions (adjusting grip).
    But of course to be complete in your footwork, other drills will be needed...


    One additional aspect, which is not really covered very well in footwork discussions, is the discussion of strategic movement following your own stroke. If e.g. you have pivoted to use your FH on your BH side and played a parallel shot your next best movement should already be toward your forehand as 80% of the returned balls will be played there.
    And this need to be part of your drills as well, that depending on the placement, you need to already move to be in the best position for the next shot. And this starts already after your own shot and not with the return of your opponent.
    Last edited by vossi39; 01-27-2022 at 02:09 PM.

  20. yogi_bear is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Master TTD Member 2,870 5,961
    yogi_bear's Avatar
    yogi_bear is offline
    This user has no status.
     
    Master TTD Member 5,961 2,870
    #20
    Ladder exercises.
    ITTF Level 1 Coaching Course Conductor at your service!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Create a new Topic:
Title is required.