Beginner looking to build a solid racket

Dang, I was just about to order my setup from Butterfly, and now you’re making me hesitant. Butterfly seems to be the most renowned and well-respected brands, that’s why I’d like to try some of their products. I’m almost certainly going to buy elsewhere in the future.
Don't worry, if You want Rozena get it. Its not too hard.

Cheers
L-zr
 
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Idk if you already bought the setup or not, but honestly I think a normal glazer would do a better job... Getting into tacky (or at least semi tacky) rubbers at this stage isnt the best idea...
I’ve had that thought, maybe Glayzer 09c is too tacky for my skill level, probably gonna go with the regular Glayzer now that someone else pointed it out as well
 
Butterfly seems to be the most renowned and well-respected brands, that’s why I’d like to try some of their products. I’m almost certainly going to buy elsewhere in the future.
The thing is, I’m not a big fan of the hassle involving multiple shipments, considering I’m in the Balkans. Also, Butterfly can assemble my racket for free, that’s a big plus for me.

TableTennis11.com has great deals, and they sell a bunch of different brands. They will also assemble your racket for you, for what it's worth.
 
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I’ve had that thought, maybe Glayzer 09c is too tacky for my skill level, probably gonna go with the regular Glayzer now that someone else pointed it out as well
Considering most Chinese beginners start with tacky rubbers, I don't think tackiness is something beginners need to avoid. I started off playing with non tacky tensor rubbers and hated the feeling. I switched to a $5 sheet of Yinhe Mercury a few months in and it instantly felt better for me.
 
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Considering most Chinese beginners start with tacky rubbers, I don't think tackiness is something beginners need to avoid. I started off playing with non tacky tensor rubbers and hated the feeling. I switched to a $5 sheet of Yinhe Mercury a few months in and it instantly felt better for me.
I may just toss a coin to decide😭
 
says Pimples Schmimples
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Dang, I was just about to order my setup from Butterfly, and now you’re making me hesitant. Butterfly seems to be the most renowned and well-respected brands, that’s why I’d like to try some of their products. I’m almost certainly going to buy elsewhere in the future.
You're right, they are.
I think you have chosen very wisely and it's a good setup correct for your level.
Just wanted to share in case it was useful 👍
Cheers
 
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I may just toss a coin to decide😭
If I had to give myself advice from a couple years ago it would be this.

As a beginner don't stress over getting something 'perfect.' Almost anything except for the fastest rackets or specialty rubbers will do the job.

Instead just get something with good value so you don't feel sunk cost fallacy and stick with something you don't like for longer than you should. I paid $200 for a Nittaku with bouncy rubbers only to find out I didn't like the small handle and bounciness. I switched to a $20 Sanwei Fextra and cheap $5 rubbers like 6 months and they felt better for me.

That Sanwei Fextra 5 that's being discussed on the forum looks like a great blade for $10. With the money saved you can try all sorts of rubbers with it.
 
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I may just toss a coin to decide😭
Or better -- you could get one European-style rubber and one Chinese-style rubber. Then you will probably end up using the Chinese rubber on your forehand. But you can test it on your backhand too and see if you like it. And vice versa with the European rubber. This is what I did when I got my first racket. I learned that I preferred Chinese rubber on both sides, and then when the time came to change rubbers I knew with more certainty what I wanted.
 
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All true.
Would you not recommend a softer BH rubber for a beginner learning to loop etc?
Learning BH with a relatively hard rubber is going to be more difficult.

I think your approach (both same) works if rubbers are relatively soft as long as not too soft on FH.
There's a V good player at our club who uses 2 Rakza 7s!
Not necessarily. It is like saying that one needs to use do way more pistol squats with your favored leg than your other leg because your favored leg tends to be stronger. In reality, developing technique is a process, in fact, depending on how you want to develop, there is nothing wrong with starting out with a blade (like any blade, including some slightly faster than usually recommended) and putting the same rubber on both sides because it allows the player to understand the similarities and differences between the strokes. Sometimes, for coaches who want their players to develop an understanding of spin focus early, they might even start their students with a soft tacky rubber like H3-50 on both sides (which they are unlikely to play with for very long) of a Viscaria but the enhanced dwell makes their stroke response easier to correlate with the ball effect. And then when the student gets reasonably proficient in swinging, they can move them to something faster or slower. Using similar stuff on both sides is very, very common, I would not act like the backhand and forehand are so different that the only model that works is using different rubbers on both sides. As an experienced player of sorts, the last week is probably the first time in the last 6 or seven years where I have used dissimilar rubbers on backhand and forehand and some would debate whether the rubbers are really dissimilar.
 
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All true.
Would you not recommend a softer BH rubber for a beginner learning to loop etc?
Learning BH with a relatively hard rubber is going to be more difficult.

I think your approach (both same) works if rubbers are relatively soft as long as not too soft on FH.
There's a V good player at our club who uses 2 Rakza 7s!
yes, I would recommend softer BH rubber, also I may recommend softer FH rubber too for beginner/intermediate.

I'm trying to say, majority of rubbers are fine to use on FH, up to a certain level which covers majority of players.
Gatekeeping is not needed, some players can benefit more from softer FH rubbers more than harders.

In this example, glayzer 09c is also great choice as well as rozena is great too. (Actually rozena might work better but trying glayzer 09c on one side is a good experience for a player to get know differences)

Rozena is not that soft almost same with tenegry. even harder than tenergy fx.

A player can start with both rozena, then seek for harder FH and stick with rozena at BH, or another player can both upgrade FH and BH to tenergy or dignics 05 etc.
 
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It ia better to just buy something reasonable and get a lot of good instruction on how to use it than to think that whatever you buy is more important than the instruction and coaching you need to get to use it properly. The instruction and coaching is way way more important than what you specifically buy. There are lots of reasonable ways to start in table tennis equipment. I would do Rozena both sides or Glayzer 09c both sides but for different reasons and depending in how I want to develop the player (speed focus or spin/power focus). But the coaching is much more important. And since they can turn over the bat, different rubbers on both sides can work as well.
 
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I may just toss a coin to decide😭
You may just buy your original setup, it's not wrong. As long as they are not super fast or super dead.
they will be your first rubbers but they won't be your last rubbers :D

The point is just developing technique and adapting equipments to your technique, not otherwise, not adapting your technique to your equipments. Even some rubbers may help in terms of spin, others in speed. you will need to create your both spin and speed.

As you progress you will know your taste of preference better, you could change accordingly.
 
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You may just buy your original setup, it's not wrong. As long as they are not super fast or super dead.
they will be your first rubbers but they won't be your last rubbers :D

The point is just developing technique and adapting equipments to your technique, not otherwise, not adapting your technique to your equipments. Even some rubbers may help in terms of spin, others in speed. you will need to create your both spin and speed.

As you progress you will know your taste of preference better, you could change accordingly.
You can adapt technique to your equipment as well, it is a two way process. And for a beginner, this is somewhat more important in the beginning, it is the advanced player that focuses more on adapting his equipment to his technique as his technique is them established and he has a better idea what he likes to do so he can focus on what let's him execute it reliably. A beginner should start with something all-round with a mild offensive bias and then go from there. I think the original set up that OP proposed was close enough.
 
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Not necessarily. It is like saying that one needs to use do way more pistol squats with your favored leg than your other leg because your favored leg tends to be stronger.
It is not at all like saying this. Not even a little bit 😂

In reality, developing technique is a process, in fact, depending on how you want to develop, there is nothing wrong with starting out with a blade (like any blade, including some slightly faster than usually recommended) and putting the same rubber on both sides
Choosing 'how' you want to develop, as a beginner isn't really a choice. Can a 6 yr old playing football decide he wants to develop like Ronaldinho. Reality might be he's more of a Carles Puyol. 😉
But I do disagree outright on starting with a faster blade. I don't know of any beginner, anywhere who didn't suffer from a blade that was too quick.
If you have personally coached people to start with a faster blade then fair enough but my experience (and observation of so many others) is blade choice is far more important than rubber choice.
Using similar stuff on both sides is very, very common, I would not act like the backhand and forehand are so different that the only model that works is using different rubbers on both sides.
Ah but similar is not the same, similar is already different.
My point really was don't go too hard on BH rubber for learning BH loop.
I wouldn't mind that it's same rubber as FH as long as it's soft enough to not hinder learning of BH technique. Starting with a softer FH rubber is less of an issue.

In the end I think all the advice given on this thread is good and well meaning (except starting with a faster blade😛) and it's given more advanced players with differing philosophies and/or approaches a chance to share some yrs of knowledge and wisdom.
 
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It is not at all like saying this. Not even a little bit 😂


Choosing 'how' you want to develop, as a beginner isn't really a choice. Can a 6 yr old playing football decide he wants to develop like Ronaldinho. Reality might be he's more of a Carles Puyol. 😉
But I do disagree outright on starting with a faster blade. I don't know of any beginner, anywhere who didn't suffer from a blade that was too quick.
If you have personally coached people to start with a faster blade then fair enough but my experience (and observation of so many others) is blade choice is far more important than rubber choice.

Ah but similar is not the same, similar is already different.
My point really was don't go too hard on BH rubber for learning BH loop.
I wouldn't mind that it's same rubber as FH as long as it's soft enough to not hinder learning of BH technique. Starting with a softer FH rubber is less of an issue.

In the end I think all the advice given on this thread is good and well meaning (except starting with a faster blade😛) and it's given more advanced players with differing philosophies and/or approaches a chance to share some yrs of knowledge and wisdom.
I know a kid who started with a faster blade and ended up USATT 2300+. I know another who was on that path but not sure whether he is still playing because covid affected a lot of things including bis interest in the sport. Their coach worked with them almost from day 1 though. What I am yet to see is a player who got really good without mentoring and coaching in a training system, regardless of equipment.

In the end, the coaching is far more important and the blade just has to be at a frequency that the player can feel enough feedback to make adjustments.
 
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Different FH and BH rubbers for a beginner/lower intermediate is not necessary. A middle-of-the-road 47.5 hardness rubber like Rakza 7 is not demanding and perfectly suitable for both BH and FH. Keep it simple at this stage. Playing Chinese Hurricane 3 and an ESN rubber like Rakza 7 on the same blade ( as recommended above) for a beginner is like learning two different games at the same time. As if TT is not complicated enough.
 
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Different FH and BH rubbers for a beginner/lower intermediate is not necessary. A middle-of-the-road 47.5 hardness rubber like Rakza 7 is not demanding and perfectly suitable for both BH and FH. Keep it simple at this stage. Playing Chinese Hurricane 3 and an ESN rubber like Rakza 7 on the same blade ( as recommended above) for a beginner is like learning two different games at the same time. As if TT is not complicated enough.
No it's not necessary but neither is it ridiculous or impossible.
FH and BH are already hugely different strokes. Itf you're setting out to learn, as opposed to just mess around on a home table, then its just as easy to learn a good FH technique with H3N on FH as it is with R7. 2 different games at the same time, definitely not, you're way over exaggerating there.
Hardness goes from 37-41.
 
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For kids it's sort of survival of the fittest. Talented ones will adapt and progress, no one really cares about less talented.
That's one argument for sure, but this is not where it applies since this kid wasn't part of a group coaching system where he came out on top. The US is different, this isn't group coaching, this is a kid that a parent bought to a club and paid the coach to train him from beginner level and the kid stuck with it long enough. There were two kids, about 3-4 years apart in age, which helped a bit, the other was 2200 but he changed equipment a lot but settled on a Boll Spirit around 1700 to 1800 USATT and became a T05 and T80 FX player though he did sometimes use Evolution MX-S on forehand. My main point though is that the original (younger) kid never used really slow beginner blades for long, everything had carbon and his dominant blade from when he was about 1500 USATT was a Boll ZLC with T05 FH, T05 FX backhand which he used pretty much forever after that. The coach just guided him on feeling the ball and he put in the hours.
 
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