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says ESN / MXP FTW! Best thing since sliced bread!
says ESN / MXP FTW! Best thing since sliced bread!
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Didn't do so well at this tournament, but not really discouraged from it. Lost to players better and way more consistent than me. Definitely froze a lot physically and mentally.

No matches recorded this time unfortunately.
There is always the next tourney and the next and the next.... no worries my friend.
 
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Took my son's five ply blade ( Nittaku Acoustic ) and tried playing it. Darn it; my ball cannot pass the net. I am such a weakling... 😡

p/s: Rubber is Andro Rasanter R45
I know you are trying to get some laughs but given that it isn't clear you know how to use your blade either, not sure whether to laugh...
 
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Didn't do so well at this tournament, but not really discouraged from it. Lost to players better and way more consistent than me. Definitely froze a lot physically and mentally.

No matches recorded this time unfortunately.
One of the benefits of the USATT rating system is that it gives you good context on your opponent's playing level. My first rating coming out of a tournament in 2011 was 563. I lost to everyone I played other than the club owner's wife, who I beat twice. 8 months later, after taking lessons for four months, I got closer to USATT 1300. But because of the knowledge of my opponent's ratings, I was never completely lost on who I was playing against. I did struggle to imagine I would ever be able to beat 1400 and 1600 players. There was even a kid who was 1400 when I was 1200 who I thought I would never beat but I beat him when we were both 1700.

The most important thing is to have fun.
 
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One of the benefits of the USATT rating system is that it gives you good context on your opponent's playing level. My first rating coming out of a tournament in 2011 was 563. I lost to everyone I played other than the club owner's wife, who I beat twice. 8 months later, after taking lessons for four months, I got closer to USATT 1300. But because of the knowledge of my opponent's ratings, I was never completely lost on who I was playing against. I did struggle to imagine I would ever be able to beat 1400 and 1600 players. There was even a kid who was 1400 when I was 1200 who I thought I would never beat but I beat him when we were both 1700.

The most important thing is to have fun.
Lol, I keep thinking I can beat anyone, then get thrashed in real games :LOL: It can be a positive though, as I always think I have a chance. My first tournament I was down 1-2 in sets and 4-7 in the 4th game against an 1800s guy and ended up beating him. Got me an overrated 1800s rating that I think realistically I'm only recently starting to live up to.
 
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Lol, I keep thinking I can beat anyone, then get thrashed in real games :LOL: It can be a positive though, as I always think I have a chance. My first tournament I was down 1-2 in sets and 4-7 in the 4th game against an 1800s guy and ended up beating him. Got me an overrated 1800s rating that I think realistically I'm only recently starting to live up to.
Wow, you're up to 1800 already? That's a huge improvement. What were you like a 1 year? I think I remember you saying a much lower rating back then.
 
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Wow, you're up to 1800 already? That's a huge improvement. What were you like a 1 year? I think I remember you saying a much lower rating back then.
On and off I have about 5 years, but I got my 1800 about 14 months after starting to play. Unfortunately lost all my practice options soon afterwards and stagnated for a few years. When I picked it back up in '22 I decided to revamp my game and I think it's just starting to show results.

These were some videos I posted of myself on mytt many years ago,

8 months in, losing to a 1700 level Jpen guy with LP RPB.

11 months in, by then beating him regularly:
 
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On and off I have about 5 years, but I got my 1800 about 14 months after starting to play. Unfortunately lost all my practice options soon afterwards and stagnated for a few years. When I picked it back up in '22 I decided to revamp my game and I think it's just starting to show results.

These were some videos I posted of myself on mytt many years ago,

8 months in, losing to a 1700 level Jpen guy with LP RPB.

11 months in, by then beating him regularly:
Your serve looks pretty good, what spin are you putting on that?

Also, I notice one very big error in your game. You are holding the racket completely wrong, you are holding it like a tennis racket.

It also took me a while to figure out (actually I should make a list of things that took me a while to figure out that nobody really tells you in the beginning), but the TT racket is supposed to be held continental grip, the same as a badminton racket. Your grip is more like the "frying pan" grip.
 
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So these videos are 3 months apart? It seems like you improved a lot in 3 months.
Yea, I think I posted them in the mytt board and asked for advice, and adjusted my technique accordingly. I had a table in my apartment building at the time and practiced against a glass wall. It was surprisingly effective, but then the apartment took the table away, my training partner stopped playing, and the club shut down and I had to go far to a crowded space where we had to play doubles half the time so everyone got a chance to play. I was starting to develop a backhand, but that stopped without training and I stagnated into a FH only game.

I've been trying to correct that since I came back to the game. And it gets increasingly harder to revamp your game as you play a certain style for longer, but I'm willing to sacrifice in the short term to gain in the long term.

As for the grip, I've switched up a bit, not sure if it counts as continental grip but it works for me.
 
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Yea, I think I posted them in the mytt board and asked for advice, and adjusted my technique accordingly. I had a table in my apartment building at the time and practiced against a glass wall. It was surprisingly effective, but then the apartment took the table away, my training partner stopped playing, and the club shut down and I had to go far to a crowded space where we had to play doubles half the time so everyone got a chance to play. I was starting to develop a backhand, but that stopped without training and I stagnated into a FH only game.

I've been trying to correct that since I came back to the game. And it gets increasingly harder to revamp your game as you play a certain style for longer, but I'm willing to sacrifice in the short term to gain in the long term.

As for the grip, I've switched up a bit, not sure if it counts as continental grip but it works for me.
Yeah your fh got a lot better. Snappy and crisp with good power.

I would love to play you, i love blocking that type of fh shot. Its just satisfying to me.
 
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Yeah your fh got a lot better. Snappy and crisp with good power.

I would love to play you, i love blocking that type of fh shot. Its just satisfying to me.
I use a lot more body now with my FH, that was the last focus of improvement when I last trained for FH. I'm focusing on footwork mostly on the FH side these days, but most of my focus is still on the BH. My BH really regressed after I stopped trainings, but now it's finally becoming useful. I aim to have my BH become a reloop machine in the next couple of months, then really focus on the FH to make it a point winner.
 
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I use quite a fast setup too and have the same feeling as you do. It is an absolute cheat code lol. The only problem is the short push which really takes a lot of technique to keep it short - I binged Fang Bo's short push tutorial and practiced it a lot of sessions. It's not bad now, I can double to triple bounce even against short topspin serves. But the spin is much less than tacky rubbers so it's not good if you pop it up. But I only use short push as a variation in maybe like 10% of the time. What this setup really excels at is chiquita, flicking, sideswipes, sudden long fast pushes. The lack of tackiness makes all these aggressive receives easier because it's just less spin sensitive. I also try to aim for all the spots that are uncomfortable for my opponent to get a decisive advantage after the receive.

You're right about needing to shorten the FH swing. If your BH and chiquita game is good, you end up with a lot of fast topspin rally exchanges. I used to have a larger FH stroke with straighter arm but it was just incompatible with the rest of my game, as I was always jammed on the FH side unless I withdrew to mid distance which then opened up my wide BH - it was a point losing pattern for me. So recently I adopted a FH backswing where I don't even straighten my arm during the backswing (only during forward swing and only if I have time to spare) and keep my racket high and I found out that even though I lost a bit of spin, I was defending my close table position way better and putting a lot more pressure to the opponent, because I could take balls as early and fast as I was on the BH. But it's a very recent change for me too!

So the general gameplay plan is a bit like Harimoto or even the women's game (for eg Sun Yingsha) - go for the flick/chiquita as much as possible then establish close table topspin rally dominance through speed and placement. No need to ever retreat to mid distance unless you're forced too. The main thing to really defend against is fast long pushes and serves where you really need small stroke opening loops that don't compromise your positions, and get you safely into the rally where you can then dominate. The other thing that I really learnt was how to loop heavy backspin early by contacting ever so slightly on the bottom of the ball (for eg if perpendicular to table is 90 deg, this would be 95-100 deg).
"
95-100 deg
So it feels like you are hitting the ball up more? Do you aim for less rotation then and it's maybe a bit less rotation but a higher percentage shot seeing as really heavy backspin open ups are one of the lower percentage shots (for non pros like me). Or is it some other type of feeling. Asking as I'm prob moving to a faster setup and this will be my Achilles heel.
 
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So it feels like you are hitting the ball up more? Do you aim for less rotation then and it's maybe a bit less rotation but a higher percentage shot seeing as really heavy backspin open ups are one of the lower percentage shots (for non pros like me). Or is it some other type of feeling. Asking as I'm prob moving to a faster setup and this will be my Achilles heel.
Most ppl fail when they try to brush too much against backspin to lift it up. I try to hit the ball from below which will achieve this slightly more than 90 deg contact. See illustration below:
 

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Most ppl fail when they try to brush too much against backspin to lift it up. I try to hit the ball from below which will achieve this slightly more than 90 deg contact. See illustration below:
Yep, I see Truls doing this a lot but less so with other players. He’s either pushing the ball up more with less rotation or actually pushing up and adding a bit of side to add a level of difficulty for the opponent.
 
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One of the benefits of the USATT rating system is that it gives you good context on your opponent's playing level. My first rating coming out of a tournament in 2011 was 563. I lost to everyone I played other than the club owner's wife, who I beat twice. 8 months later, after taking lessons for four months, I got closer to USATT 1300. But because of the knowledge of my opponent's ratings, I was never completely lost on who I was playing against. I did struggle to imagine I would ever be able to beat 1400 and 1600 players. There was even a kid who was 1400 when I was 1200 who I thought I would never beat but I beat him when we were both 1700.

The most important thing is to have fun.
Yeah taking lessons for 6 months so far once a week, so I know rebuilding my technique is going to take some time. I'm having fun with it, but it's definitely a grind to travel a bit to get coaching and to play in tournaments.

One thing I want to work on is to not get so tired during a match, and this may be to not being comfortable in a new playing environment. I was too tense, so a lot of my attempts went way long. By the third match, I was just not moving at all.
 
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Yep, I see Truls doing this a lot but less so with other players. He’s either pushing the ball up more with less rotation or actually pushing up and adding a bit of side to add a level of difficulty for the opponent.
Actually with this approach angle you can still control whether you want max topspin or a dead ball. Truls definitely does vary it very well, other players tend to stick with just trying to loop with max topspin. Anyway, the concept is to use the angle of approach (as well as blade angle) to make lifting heavy backspin much easier.

I was forced to learn this because of all the penholders who just love ghost pushing with extreme backspin (I kid you not, quite a few of those pushes will go back towards them after dropping to the floor), and then once you lose your position trying to brush loop the damn ball that weighs like an elephant, they will do even more disgusting shots (punch dead, sidespin block, chopblock, or LP/SP reverse spin). If I push these balls back, I'm not able to deal with the penhold FH attack as its too strong. Fml I'm always playing these kinds of players these days!

So basically against them it's more important to protect my position at the table than to actually do a killer loop.
 
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Actually with this approach angle you can still control whether you want max topspin or a dead ball. Truls definitely does vary it very well, other players tend to stick with just trying to loop with max topspin. Anyway, the concept is to use the angle of approach (as well as blade angle) to make lifting heavy backspin much easier.

I was forced to learn this because of all the penholders who just love ghost pushing with extreme backspin (I kid you not, quite a few of those pushes will go back towards them after dropping to the floor), and then once you lose your position trying to brush loop the damn ball that weighs like an elephant, they will do even more disgusting shots (punch dead, sidespin block, chopblock, or LP/SP reverse spin). If I push these balls back, I'm not able to deal with the penhold FH attack as its too strong. Fml I'm always playing these kinds of players these days!

So basically against them it's more important to protect my position at the table than to actually do a killer loop.
I'm in the same scenario. The ratio of pips out players I'm playing has got to be over 50%, ensuring the ball finds the other side of the table is my main concern over hitting clean winners.
 
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I'm in the same scenario. The ratio of pips out players I'm playing has got to be over 50%, ensuring the ball finds the other side of the table is my main concern over hitting clean winners.
This has to be one of the smartest statements period in TT when it comes to playing pips players, I find too many players who want to hit the ball hard against a pips player before taking their time to figure out what is on it, and how to get the ball they can put away.
 
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