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View Full Version : Fan Zhendong - Backhand Slow Motion (you should study)



Askan
02-01-2018, 03:21 PM
Hey guys,

i just created a short clip of some amazing backhand-shots from Fan Zhendong. I did some close capture and slow motion. I think it is a shot we should study. Probably smaller players and in situations near the table you could make great use of this technique!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFwYKPi02z8&feature=youtu.be


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFwYKPi02z8&feature=youtu.be

How do you think about his technique? I also would appreciate any feedback to the clip and if it was helpful, please consider liking it. Thanks.:rolleyes:

timgapinski1
02-25-2018, 08:35 AM
I agree.


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timgapinski1
02-25-2018, 09:23 AM
What I take from this is how calm, fast and accurate this shot is. With a deep shot like this I would typically tense up and hit the ball to late or to early and with out reading and reacting to the spin. I would also probably step back as well. To make a shot like this I would typically have just told myself to not stand down and fight at the net like a boxer. That would help my stance and help me and gauge the speed and spin. But to wait and be that fast and accurate at the final impact I would also need a very different image in my mind. More like the flutter of a humming bird wing. Having a very delicate and loose touch that stays precise and is early to read the slightest nuance of the speed, trajectory and spin. Then thirdly, there is this explosive patient assault like a cobra. So yes, this is a very difficult ball to return and here it is returned by a master of the sport. Now think of all three pictures in your mind but put them into one motion. the boxer, the hummingbird and the cobra. This kind of imagery works for me, maybe because I am equally a thinker and a feeler. But it's not about thinking or feeling really. It's more how a young tiger might learn to hunt from his mother. It's all just comes from the physical imitation of the memory of watching mom wait and pounce and the instinct of wanting to be like her and feel the power of your own body and skill. and of course lots of good practice as well!


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UpSideDownCarl
02-25-2018, 09:07 PM
He is getting a crazy amount of spin on those shots.


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allencorn
02-25-2018, 10:14 PM
I'd love to study it, but the motion is so fast at the point of contact, I can't. His wrist muscles are so strong (his banana flick serve return is fabulous), not too many mortals can compare. Not sure trying to copy this is a good idea for anyone not as fit as he is.

Loopadoop
02-26-2018, 10:09 AM
What is his rubber topsheet would be good to know whether tacky or not.

Fabian
02-26-2018, 10:18 AM
Tenergy 05 on his BH

Raylazyfo
02-26-2018, 11:16 AM
Hey guys,

i just created a short clip of some amazing backhand-shots from Fan Zhendong. I did some close capture and slow motion. I think it is a shot we should study. Probably smaller players and in situations near the table you could make great use of this technique!!


Watch this insane Backhand at 7:05 against harimoto
www.youtube.com/watch?v=F48VWFO7U6c

Askan
02-26-2018, 12:27 PM
Watch this insane Backhand at 7:05 against harimoto
www.youtube.com/watch?v=F48VWFO7U6c (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F48VWFO7U6c)

i saw the full match already =) my favourite shot:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qtyiAG629GA

Askan
02-26-2018, 12:31 PM
What I take from this is how calm, fast and accurate this shot is. With a deep shot like this I would typically tense up and hit the ball to late or to early and with out reading and reacting to the spin. I would also probably step back as well. To make a shot like this I would typically have just told myself to not stand down and fight at the net like a boxer. That would help my stance and help me and gauge the speed and spin. But to wait and be that fast and accurate at the final impact I would also need a very different image in my mind. More like the flutter of a humming bird wing. Having a very delicate and loose touch that stays precise and is early to read the slightest nuance of the speed, trajectory and spin. Then thirdly, there is this explosive patient assault like a cobra. So yes, this is a very difficult ball to return and here it is returned by a master of the sport. Now think of all three pictures in your mind but put them into one motion. the boxer, the hummingbird and the cobra. This kind of imagery works for me, maybe because I am equally a thinker and a feeler. But it's not about thinking or feeling really. It's more how a young tiger might learn to hunt from his mother. It's all just comes from the physical imitation of the memory of watching mom wait and pounce and the instinct of wanting to be like her and feel the power of your own body and skill. and of course lots of good practice as well!


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nice comparison!

i also realised how short the full motion actually is. when i practice my stroke is much longer (and still weaker). i think we need to consider this and maybe re-learn or re-educate the BH-Topspin.

sderyke2002
02-26-2018, 03:47 PM
If you watch the end of his loop it looks like he opens his wrist with a snap motion (closing the blade on the ball) like a slam right as the ball leaves. It looks like the kind of snap players in the old hard bat days were known for. The kind of motion that Fred Perry took to tennis and that no one could match.