Kim Jung Hoon teaches basic footwork for balls to FH

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Nexy / TAK9.com just uploaded another vid to their youtube channel !!

Kim Jung Hoon teaches a player who has had lessons just one month (ONE MONTH !!!) how one can move to hit a ball to their FH. This player is damned good for one month of lessons, usually a Korean coach will not let them do anything more complicated than a slow one step with super slow rate multiball feed for the first few months.

This time, I made a longer jist that is almost a complete record, but not quite. I do not work in the UN translator department, so don't ask me for a full translation please :)

KJH makes a lot of great points about footwork execution, how to think and many small basic things that are keys to success. Enjoy the fun.


Player: (0:30) I would like to have better footwork in match play so I can get to the ball and hit. As it is now, it is difficult for me to follow along to the ball

KJH: Learning footwork is really difficult. Explaining the techniques and showing it are totally different things. I see Div 1 and Div 2 players who have good enough footwork, almost like pros, they hit and play very well. Practicing footwork is very difficult. It is hard to say this is good or bad, because each situation is different. Think of footwork steps like walking steps (KJH walks back and forth between the corners. IN table tennis running steps do not work. You try running style to get to the ball and you will experience epic fail. So... (KJH does single ball with his pro partner) if you need to move to the right, you do one step like this, you need to cross over, like this. I try to stay in BH corner to use my FH, so I do a lot of moving to my right to use FH, both one step, two step, hop step and crossover. Sometimes I use a BH punch or BH drive when the ball is to my body or BH. I decide ahead of time and setup zones whee the ball lands so I have already decided whether to use a BH or FH. If the ball lands here (points to the table a little to the BH side of middle line) or to the right, I will use a FH and I know what footwork to use to get there as I can see where the ball is going. (This simplifies decision making and makes you play faster)

Player: (3:40) I do a step around to use FH and now I'm caught behind my BH corner, when the ball goes crosscourt to my wide FH, I cannot get to it. (Player demonstrates trying to get there by using 2 step footwork three times and is obviously too slow)

KJH: Ah. I see. Even players with a great BH tell me to use the FH. (so stepping around BH corner to hit a strong FH is BETTER) Now if you decide to step around the BH corner and hit with the FH, here is what you do. (KJH demonstrates a dry run hit in slow motion) (KJH then shows the first thing to do is to move left foot in a crossover step and plants it.) (KJH pauses and explains) You crossover left foot and step to here like this. (KJH stops in middle of explanation and signals to start a single ball rally to show player what he is saying. KJH makes a FH drive to partner and he blocks it wide to KJH FH corner. KJH does a crossover step to get to the ball and make a FH loop.

KJH goes back to BH corner to explain what is important. KJH says that one REAL important point is to keep your chest pointed forward to table. (Keep chest/shoulders squared to table) KJH then does a crossover step to hit a ball while failing to keep chest squared to table. That results in his head pointing down. KJH gets to the ball and hits it, but has no vision of the point after he hits it and recovering is difficult too. Then KJH shows how to do it right keeping chest squared to table. he moves with ease to the ball, is able to make a strong shot and finishes on balance ready to move or attack again.

KJH goes back to BH corner (5:26) and explains that amatures want to track and follow the ball totally horizontally and they often fail to get to the ball with a crossover step. Look, when you step around the BH corner, there really isn't a direct line of travel to do that anyway. It is a LOT better to make the crossover step go a little BEHIND you as you go to the side. KJH demonstrates the first leg of that step and crosses over his left foot to his right and almost a meter behind the FH corner. He does a live rep and his left foot lands a bit past the BH corner and 2/3 meter or so behind it. What he doesn't explain is he takes a very short step with his RIGHT foot first to the rear and side. KJH does one live rep and explains that doing the crossover this way keeps you open and able to make a strong shot. He does a couple more reps showing this and then the player moves in to the BH corner to practice. (6:01)

Player: How? Like this? KHJ explains no and that you feel it as you turn in the recovery turn of your body and make your steps. Practice partner hits a ball way wide FH corner player is not ready for and KJH tells his partner even HE would have a difficult time to get that one and to hit it less extreme angle. Player does the crossover and hits a FH, but is stumbling right after he hits it and doesn't recover very well. KJH explains that he is not on balance when he is hitting the ball and not squaring away. Also moving too horizontal. KJH explains that the player needs to use more body rotation. (rotate ALL the way) (7:25)

Player does another rep and KJH tells him he pulled back (the shoulder and arm) and just sent it forward. (without much rotation) Player does reps and KJH interrupts him to tell him at 7:50 he need to step to the rear some more. At 8:13 KJH tells player to wait a little longer before hitting. At 8:25 KJH tells player his steps are not all that bad. He says this is physically demanding stuff. Don't worry about whether you will make a great shot, just focus on getting to the spot on time on balance. Don't worry about chasing it, (to the side) go back a little and wait on it.

KHJ does another rep and goes more than a meter behind the table and almost a meter past the FH corner. JKH says you can wait for the ball here. KJH says you should practice like this stepping more to the rear than you think. (9:20) Player does a rep horrible at 9:34 and KJH tells him to look forward (square chest) and stay on balance and form. Next rep at 9:40 KJH says player went too far forward. KJH calls time at 9:48 and explains player needs to NOT watch the ball as he follows it, but to watch the ball first to see how far it goes, to keep chest squared and watch the ball, move accordingly to a spot behind where the ball goes, wait and let go with your shot. He repeats a lot. WATCH the ball FIRST. (where it will go) explains to 10:30 KJH says this is difficult stuff to learn right away, requires a lot of practice.

Player does a few more reps and KJH is telling player to wait some more for the ball at 10:40. KJH then moves the player to a position simulating where you step around BH corner and has player do dry reps. KJH emphasizes that the crossover step player is doing... player needs to step to the rear some more. KJH shows that he needs to rotate body even more to fullest extent on backswing as he is moving.

At 11:45 KJH explains that decision making of whether to step around to hit a FH or make a crossover step to a ball to wide FH is an important skill in TT. KJH stands middle BH area and has partner multiball hit random either right at KHJ (or to BH corner) or to wide FH. KJH then quickly sees ball, makes the right choice and steps around the balls at him or BH corner, or does a short crossover step to make a FH on balls past his wide FH corner.

Player steps in to do this drill at 12:15 and is not ready for most of these balls. He doesn't step around much and he doesn't get to the FH balls, his movement is off. KJH calls time at 12:33 and explains player is form in moving is not right. His rythm is not there. KJH asks how long the player has been taking lessons. Player has been with lessons one month. KJH says he should downshift the difficulty to something simpler, like moving to FH hit balls near middle of the table.

At 13:30 KJH demonstrates player should practice first one step footwork where the player from a ready stance has to move only a foot or two to the ball and can do so with moving just the right foot to the side into position to make a FH shot. (This leads later to being able to make a short step with the right foot to enable the crossover with the left on time on balance in rhythm)

At 14:00 player is asking when to backswing. If he has to backswing as he steps or if he steps then backswings. KJH's answer is depends on the ball. Often, you backswing and move at the same time. Sometimes you can get there early, then backswing and hit. At 15:20 KJH explains that amatures often hit the ball too far in front. Player then does more one step multiball reps. KJH likes player's hit at 15:38. At 15:45 KJH tells player to let ball come back to zone some more and player makes 5-6 in a row good. At 16:25 KJH explains that one should feel natural in legs and follow the ball, NOT to Gorilla overpower the ball with upper body and allow the ball to come into the hitting zone. Wait a little more.

KJH takes charge of feeding multiball around 17:00 and at 17:15 asks player to stay close to the table and allow the ball to come into the zone and then make the hit. KJH asks player to move and backswing together. At 18:30 KJH is showing how to hit making a small step with right foot and how to time the step and swing together. KJH explains this is bread and butter step in a real match as you execute this very fast at the table often. At 19:00, KJH explains that even though he steps slowly, he can still get there and lay good wood on the ball.

KJH explains that the player should completely learn and become real good at this fast one step bang-bang back and forth play before moving on to working on the cross-over step footwork. At 19:20, KJH is explaining that the player has been taking (2-3x a week) lessons (at a local club) for only a month and it is too early to working on perfecting the crossover footwork. At 19:20, player is concerned about hitting FH from BH corner or near it and not being able to cover the ball to his wide FH. KJH explains that in a match, more often you stay at the table and can reach most balls to your FH with one step and recover fast and repeat. He says this is more common in a match than doing a lot of crossover footwork plays right now.

At 19:30 player goes back to a close to the table one step hit FH multiball drill. Right away player is making a good one step on balance and hits with good pace KJH likes it a lot. KJH says player is FAST and that is what he will do more often in a match. Now the balls are fed to wide FH corner and player has to make a hop step to the right to hit. Player is fast and gets to most. At 19:52 KJH calls time and explains that the player in his basic FH swing needs to come up a little more and finish higher. (like salute we always hear about) AND he needs to wait a little more.

At 20:43 KJH tells player he is stepping good to the ball. Yet, his body control could be better (start with chest squared and rotate shoulders as you move) (not immediately open body and move) (then try to awkwardly hit) KJH explains that you use the strength of the entire body to move, not just the legs. At 22:22 player is not getting to a ball past his FH corner, KJH says at this time you can do a quick crossover step as one step (without explosive hop step) will not get you far enough to the ball. At 23:15 KJH is concerned camera angle isn't showing the player's step. Then the next angle shows it.

At 24:00 KJH explains that you basically make one step (one step or hop/jump step) to right for the FH hit or you "fall back" and step (crossover) and that is all there is to basic foot work. He stresses it is important to plant the right foot. (to use as anchor to allow us of the body to generate stroke power) At 24:43 KJH is saying to do the planting of the right foot and the swing together at the same time. (in a situation under pressure at the table where there isn't time to get there wait then start stroke) KJH praise many hits then corrects the player telling him to plant the foot instead of bring it forward. Then player hits one into net and KJH tells the player to swing coming upwards some (like in the salute)

At 25:37 KJH switches gears and discusses theory of how to construct the point in fast exchange rally close to the table. If you are in the middle of the table or slightly to the BH corner, sometimes if a ball comes to your BH side, you simply make a BH drive (it is a quick shot without a lot of swing and can be employed quickly and make good pace) or sometimes a series of drives before you get a ball to your FH to FH drive high pace. He explains that pros play at fast pace like the example rally he had with partner, but amature players play slower, but see the ball and get into motion less quickly. SO, sometimes a player has to do a quick hop step to the side and do the swing for the FH drive at the same time, because player lost a lot of time reacting or getting started in motion.

KJH goes on to explain that amatures might be in a position where they thing the ball comes and prep their FH backswing, then the ball suddenly goes outside their FH hitting zone. So, the player has to be able to suddenly make a quick side step and swing at the same time to be able to hit the ball. So this one step footwork is real important in a fast rally. Move leg, plant swing/hit all at the same time under pressure.
At 26:55 KJH has the partner feed multiball several in succession to the BH (player is supposed to make BH drive) and the feeder suddenly makes a fast hit to the FH. (player is supposed to quickly react with the quick one step and swing hit same time to get to the bal and get it back fast. Player makes his 3-4 BH drives then is flat footed and watches the FH ball go right by him and he grins. Player keeps doing the drill, getting some of the FH and missing some. He watches the FH ball go right by him at 27:30 and KJH says THIS is the time you utilize that quick one step footwork. Player doesn't get the next few FH suprise balls over the net, but KJH praises him for executing the footwork correctly.

At 28:00. KJH explains and demonstrates with a circular motion simulating a BH drive within the zone to keep stance and balance and recovery, then he shows he is able to suddenly cover the FH ball with the one step he shows. The he demonstrates teh same thing, but suddenly executes a crossover going way wide FH. KJH stopped player at 28:50 to gush over his good crossover (not going to side, but some to rear and got to ball on time) KJH says that more so than trying to get to such and such position and do such and such backswing, that it is better to naturally move the feet/legs, keep watching the ball, and let your shot go.

KJH looked at the clock and remarked on how 30 minutes goes by fast. He then had the player finish by doing a multiball drill where he hits one BH from BH corner, then does a step-around FH to the next ball to BH corner. KHJ watches the player then steps in and tells him not to make wild FH swing in front of body, but to match the speed of the ball with a compact stroke, not a long wild one. Even if you choose to make a larger swing, you still have to "catch" the ball (within your hitting zone) Do NOT have a "flying" feeling to your swing.
last tip KJH gives is that when you step around, make your shot and do not look to the FH side. If the ball goes that way, you see it (by looking forward) (and you know how to get there in time.) KHJ corrected his stance (not open enough to allow a step around) KJH noted player had Badminton shoes on. KJH has him do a final reps and stops player to tell him right now not to worry about if ball goes in but to focus on getting the movement right to allow an efficient step around move. KJH tells him to step around completely. Player is READY to end the lesson, he is gassed, even for a real fit young dude.

I can tell you first hand, Korean coaches are a LOT more brutal in footwork drills than this, you don't get any breaks and if you are about to collapse from your heart busting over 220 BPM, you only get a stern look and an expectation to immediately resume training. You often get to this point after coach does various one step or two step footwork drills for 5 minutes at insane ball feed pace, then tries to polish you off with explosive combination drills requiring LOTS of stepping around and crossovers to reach fast blocks. Coach is always on a (successful) mission to wear you the heck out. :)
 
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says 2023 Certified Organ Donor
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Giant, no I didn't TRANSLATE it, I just wrote down what they were saying in key areas. A complete translation would take WAY too long for me and I have no desire to do spend many hours on one piece. I already every week have to translate a 4 page small font sermon written in a way we do not use verbal style Korean and that kinda drains my desire for more difficult translation work.
 
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I just run out of words to express my gratitude to you.
I never knew about "keeping chest squared to table". I can do the crossover step quite well but sometimes I failed repeatedly and never realized what went wrong.
 
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Thx iammaru, maybe you can find some Vietnamese nuggets and get with Brice from TTD to help out...

Brice is on the RIGHT end of this pic with hiz new wife and fellow Vietnamese TT buddies in Seoul Uni area

1-17.jpg

I made a longer comment over on my other "KJH BH Nuggets" Thread and I won't further pollute this space duplicating it..
 
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Thx iammaru, maybe you can find some Vietnamese nuggets and get with Brice from TTD to help out...
yeah, I will see what I can do. But there are very few worthy videos in Vietnamese. Most of the videos I found are in Chinese, Korean, Japanese or English.
 
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I think Brice is holding a Der_Echte provided 896 bat in this pic, stripe down that blade looks a LOT like the 896...
Haha that was 896 bat you gave me.. I had played with it for 6 months or so before I changed to my current bat (Petr Korbel). Not only the bat, but also Dawei XP 2008 on my backhand, but soon later I realized that it only helped me block the ball well but couldn't help me gain my consistency in attacking offensively, and it turned out Tibhar Aurus could give me all feeling and fit in all strategies I need haha
 
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yeah, I will see what I can do. But there are very few worthy videos in Vietnamese. Most of the videos I found are in Chinese, Korean, Japanese or English.

I never learned table tennis in Vietnam before, so frankly speaking I was so curious when I started. By that time, Im sure I have found hundred coaching vids, but I can't follow any of them 'coz everything (right, almost everything...) seems to be different from what I learn in Korea. Or maybe just me 'coz my level is not that high to see the matching point, but one thing is clear that at any level of amateur in Korea, the coach never spend more than 30 minutes (usually 20 min) for one time lesson. Many my friends back home (Vietnam) are also doing coaching, and they spend 1 hour or more per each, that I feel so sorry for the coach and for the trainee as well :p
 
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I never learned table tennis in Vietnam before, so frankly speaking I was so curious when I started. By that time, Im sure I have found hundred coaching vids, but I can't follow any of them 'coz everything (right, almost everything...) seems to be different from what I learn in Korea.
I haven't got a coach for a very long time (since I learnt the very basic skills), now I just watch coaching vids and try anything that looks interesting and see if it works for me :D

one thing is clear that at any level of amateur in Korea, the coach never spend more than 30 minutes (usually 20 min) for one time lesson. Many my friends back home (Vietnam) are also doing coaching, and they spend 1 hour or more per each, that I feel so sorry for the coach and for the trainee as well :p
really? Is 30 mins a little too short? Do you train with other people (besides your coach) or robot? In Vietnam, I think the beginners need to spend more than 30 mins each session to practice their skills and since they are not good yet, they have no one to practice with except the coach. 30 mins training for higher level players is fine because they are good enough to practice on their own with other players.
 
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really? Is 30 mins a little too short? Do you train with other people (besides your coach) or robot? In Vietnam, I think the beginners need to spend more than 30 mins each session to practice their skills and since they are not good yet, they have no one to practice with except the coach. 30 mins training for higher level players is fine because they are good enough to practice on their own with other players.
Not short at all, like William said, Korean coaches do know how to dry your energy out so quickly :D
For me, I can only stand for 20 min and thats it for the lesson. Of course, besides the lesson I enjoy practicing with another dudes and playing game stuffs...
The lesson cycle is 8 times/month and 20 min/time, and they earn 140 bucks or more for one cycle.
The standard expectation from the Korean coaches are very common in most of club I have known. You easily judge somebody's skill if you know how many years has he been taking lesson.

1st year = they do know all basic skills with a little footwork
2nd year = they start working on footwork and sharpen their game
3rd year and longer = all game management and tactics stuff, of course with further improvement in every aspect, like power, spin, placement and consistency.

And from the 3rd year level, if they want to climb up to higher national level playing in amateur league, they gotta work a lot more, spend money, time and effort to hang around many clubs to interact with more various types of play.
Of course what im saying here is still for amateur level, so dun blame me if you see its not true when Korean team is still nothing compared to China :p
 
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Not short at all, like William said, Korean coaches do know how to dry your energy out so quickly :D
For me, I can only stand for 20 min and thats it for the lesson. Of course, besides the lesson I enjoy practicing with another dudes and playing game stuffs...
The lesson cycle is 8 times/month and 20 min/time, and they earn 140 bucks or more for one cycle.

Yup, Even the fittest will want to tap out BEFORE the full 20 minutes is up. A few Koreans take 30 minute lessons, but coach has to take it much easier on them. Korean footwork training is summed up in one word... BRUTAL. Physically brutal punishment to all your muscles and lungs. If anyone thinks they are a tough guy (or gal), just challenge teh Korean coach and TRY to follow along and keep up, even if coach takes it easy the first 5-8 minutes. By the time coach gets 4-5 minutes into the demanding part of the workout, you will wish you kept your mouth closed haha.

The $140 USD covers both unlimited club play for a month and the 3x a week 20 min long lessons for the entire month. That is a really great price and convenience. In a US full time club if you are LUCKY to live in a city with one, you pay $50-$60 an HOUR minimum for that level of a coach (former pro or semi-pro) and the same ammount of lessons (they add up to 4 hrs a month) would cost over $300 for the month with club memebrship.
 
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