Skills to beat 1400-1500 level players?

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These skills are most important
Service
1st shot is 1st opportunity to win or lose

Footwork
combined with
pushing Short and long
If you are good at pushing you can control the ball and therefore control you opponent
and this will help you with
Receiving
which is the 2nd shot of the rally!
Blocking passive and active
will enable you to control your opponents topspin and therefore control him

You will get more good chances to play
Topspin drives if your

Service
Footwork
pushing
receiving
blocking
skills are in good shape

Actually whether you play 1500 or 2000 level the skills required are pretty much the same
good luck
 
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Serve the ball, win direct points
thats what I been doing, until the kid made it to 1750
Now he is around 2000, and forcing me to move around after my serve (lol)

PS. in my younger years, I used to serve 1 hour a day (7 days a week) for over a year.
That equates to about 1000 serves a day, or 300 000 serves that year.
 
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1400-1500 are usually decent in the rally. you can get a lot of points off them by varying the speed, spin and placement of your shots. Also, they will usually have a glaring weakness that they haven't fortified yet. try to identify that weakness and exploit it as much as possible. it will take them longer to adjust to it in the match.
 
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Serve the ball, win direct points
thats what I been doing, until the kid made it to 1750
Now he is around 2000, and forcing me to move around after my serve (lol)

PS. in my younger years, I used to serve 1 hour a day (7 days a week) for over a year.
That equates to about 1000 serves a day, or 300 000 serves that year.
That's very true, but if you're get too many aces then you won't get to practice other shots as much. I would suggest working on services that focus on getting poor quality returns (e.g. deceptive short services) rather than the fast ones that usually get your aces at the lower level. That way you can work on the opening loop more.

That strategy helped me develop my early game, but I then made the mistake of focusing on loop-killing the return, which caused my rally game to fall behind.
 
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Depends how much time you have to practice. I saw a WRM video a few weeks ago that advocated if you have limited time to practice, practice limited a number of skills. They recommended a good underpin serve short, a good spinny push, and attacking against underspin. With those three skills, you can get pretty far.
 
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That's very true, but if you're get too many aces then you won't get to practice other shots as much. I would suggest working on services that focus on getting poor quality returns (e.g. deceptive short services) rather than the fast ones that usually get your aces at the lower level. That way you can work on the opening loop more.

That strategy helped me develop my early game, but I then made the mistake of focusing on loop-killing the return, which caused my rally game to fall behind.
well, you should aim to work on things more in training and less in matches.
unless there is no training and only matches
But if the OP wants to win, then having a good serve and not loosing those 2 points needs to be a start.
I find that beginners don't work on serves enough

and of course, good serve will open for 3rd ball,
 
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Depends how much time you have to practice. I saw a WRM video a few weeks ago that advocated if you have limited time to practice, practice limited a number of skills. They recommended a good underpin serve short, a good spinny push, and attacking against underspin. With those three skills, you can get pretty far.
That is correct
I only ever did 4 serves in my serve pratice.
FH short or BH short (both aiming for net post)
and FH and BH long (both aiming for the corner of the table).

and then because of that, decades later, I can still do this coming off my chair and without warming up.


People tend to practice top spin vs top spin, or loop vs loop way more in practice.
But in Asia, we focus way more on first 3 to first 5, then it can be open play.

I will be making a series of training videos so many can try and mimic.
I already have the content, just need to start making my script then can put them together.
I'm guessing, it will easily be 5 to 10 episodes
 
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Which drills should I work on to beat 1400-1500 level players?
(I have a Power Pong robot, if that helps?)
Honestly for 1400 level, I think the most important shot is the underspin push. Most of the 1400 level players win by just pushing back and forth.

1400 players cant loop well yet, so they win loops equally as much as they throw away loops.

I know several cocky 1500 type players that easily beat 1400 guys by just pushing and never looping. They never earn their points, but just wait for error.

The 1600 players kinda breakthrough by establishing the fh loop
 
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well, you should aim to work on things more in training and less in matches.
unless there is no training and only matches
But if the OP wants to win, then having a good serve and not loosing those 2 points needs to be a start.
I find that beginners don't work on serves enough

and of course, good serve will open for 3rd ball,
Oh I agree on working on serves, just not on serves for aces. I'm assuming the player is in the US based on the ratings I presume he's using, and in my experience, the vast majority of players don't get many training opportunities in the US. Most don't get a coach as it costs $50-100/hr, and since he's asking the question here I assume he doesn't have a regular coach. When you go to a club people just want to play games so no way to train there either.
 
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Honestly for 1400 level, I think the most important shot is the underspin push. Most of the 1400 level players win by just pushing back and forth.

1400 players cant loop well yet, so they win loops equally as much as they throw away loops.

I know several cocky 1500 type players that easily beat 1400 guys by just pushing and never looping. They never earn their points, but just wait for error.

The 1600 players kinda breakthrough by establishing the fh loop
I think this is an underrated answer. Case in point: About 7 years ago a player from my club in Los Angeles who had been a very good garage player, joined the club. Without taking any lessons, within two years he won the under 1400 US Nationals. Then a year later he won under 2000 US Nationals. His game consisted of a super effective underspin push and a backhand smash whenever the ball popped up. His opponent in the 2000 Finals struggled to loop his pushes.
 
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I think this is an underrated answer. Case in point: About 7 years ago a player from my club in Los Angeles who had been a very good garage player, joined the club. Without taking any lessons, within two years he won the under 1400 US Nationals. Then a year later he won under 2000 US Nationals. His game consisted of a super effective underspin push and a backhand smash whenever the ball popped up. His opponent in the 2000 Finals struggled to loop his pushes.
Sounds like one of my training partners. During trading he plays normal, but in games it’s mainly pushing until he has to snapshot, forehand or backhand..
In a game almost never a heavy loop,


Cheers
L-zr
 
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Sounds like one of my training partners. During trading he plays normal, but in games it’s mainly pushing until he has to snapshot, forehand or backhand..
In a game almost never a heavy loop,


Cheers
L-zr
Its similar to tennis. Up to a certain level, the most effective shot is just a lob or a slice.

In TT, the safest shot is the push. You dont really breakthrough this pattern until 1600
 
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Its similar to tennis. Up to a certain level, the most effective shot is just a lob or a slice.

In TT, the safest shot is the push. You dont really breakthrough this pattern until 1600
I’m not sure I agree, I can’t slice wort a damn and my push is not really spinny. I actually have a better offensive forehand chop. But that’s probably just the moment of surprise, You don’t get opportunities often.

My training buddy kills my openings with a smash quite often, so now always take step backwards…

Cheers
L-zr
 
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Which drills should I work on to beat 1400-1500 level players?
(I have a Power Pong robot, if that helps?)

Hi FF,

Burn this image into your TT bat handle high up where you can see it all the time... do it on both sides.

let them F up 1.PNG


let them F up 2.PNG
 
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There was a quote from a tennis coach many years ago. "Keep the ball deep and in play and you'll be famous by Friday."

Not missing is far more important than hitting hard for a very long time.
 
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There was a quote from a tennis coach many years ago. "Keep the ball deep and in play and you'll be famous by Friday."

Not missing is far more important than hitting hard for a very long time.
It's a great point for winning but I don't have fun when I just push and wait around for the other guy to miss. I like to hit winners so my policy is 3 chop max. After that it's winner or nothing. Lol
 
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Oh I agree on working on serves, just not on serves for aces. I'm assuming the player is in the US based on the ratings I presume he's using, and in my experience, the vast majority of players don't get many training opportunities in the US. Most don't get a coach as it costs $50-100/hr, and since he's asking the question here I assume he doesn't have a regular coach. When you go to a club people just want to play games so no way to train there either.
yep, and that is pretty much the same place every where on earth. Including amateur clubs in Taiwan. Its matches after matches after matches.

Its important to find someone who wants to improve by forms of training, otherwise the growth would be pretty slow.

Like for example - pushing pushing pushing. You won't get too far with such a suggestion. And it is easy to beat against someone who only does that, ie serving top spin and the whole pushing strategy goes down the drain
 
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