Faster equipment doesn't always mean less control. (Viscaria/Intensity)

says Serve, top, edge. Repeat.
says Serve, top, edge. Repeat.
Active Member
May 2020
936
455
1,654
Read 1 reviews
Hello!

A few days ago I found my old Viscaria and glued my rubbers on it. I immediately felt more control and more shots landed on the table.

For the past year I've been using stiga Intensity with various rubbers including tenergy, bluestorm, goldarc, calibra tour.

Viscaria is softer than the Intensity, because even though the Viscaria has carbon and is quite a bit faster, the Intensity has thick Walnut outer ply and is considerably harder than the thin Koto layer used in the Viscaria. The Viscaria has been used for 5 years and Intensity for 3. So both blades have broken in and gotten as soft as they're gonna get.

My initial thoughts immediately after the switch is that the throw angle of the Viscaria is lower and I could use more power without worrying that the ball would fly off the table, the Intensity in the other hand throws the ball higher. If not in perfect position, Viscaria gave that extra kick that allows you to play softer, Intensity has less dwell and requires more power to get a similar result, making out of position shots and in general weird shots harder to get back in.

I'll keep using it for a few weeks to see how my game will change according to the blade.

So far I think that there is more to the control of a blade than just speed/control. Hardness, stiffness and throw also play a big role.

Have you guys encountered something similar with your equipment?
 
  • Like
Reactions: ben1229
This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Well-Known Member
Apr 2014
1,511
1,108
2,658
Read 3 reviews
So far I think that there is more to the control of a blade than just speed/control. Hardness, stiffness and throw also play a big role.
But of course. The direct ratio between speed and control (less of one means more of the other) is way too simple, but it has been learned and propagated by the industry, not least via graphics on blades...

My own definition of control is "the best support for what you intend to play", and you also have to feel good with it.

So if you give me a slow racket with thin slow rubbers and a grip that I despise the control in my game will suffer endlessly.

Control is not absence of speed, it´s really subjective.
 
says Serve, top, edge. Repeat.
says Serve, top, edge. Repeat.
Active Member
May 2020
936
455
1,654
Read 1 reviews
My own definition of control is "the best support for what you intend to play", and you also have to feel good with it.

This is the keyword, feel. Feel plays more role in control than speed, at the same time I think there is too fast and too hard, especially for newer players.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Spinsanity
This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Active Member
Nov 2019
504
379
1,680
Read 1 reviews
I've seen more or less the same. Blades were similar too: Yasaka Ma Lin Extra Offensive same structure as Intensity but stiffer and faster. 729 Blue Arylate same structure as Viscaria but with a thicker koto ply and overall a bit thicker.
Compared to the YEO the BA is not that much faster when not utilizing the carbon. Finishing points close to the table (hard power loops) needed a bit practice due to the carbon kicking in. Further away from the table the stability and speed of the BA are really helpful. No need to play with full power to finish points (more control) and it's easier to get more spin and still enough speed to vary topspins (also more control). When out of position the additional speed also helps to get a couple of balls more back on the table.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lodro and Jan_
This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Active Member
Jun 2018
614
350
2,596
I tend to agree. Ive come back to outer ALC blades and (maybe its just because I've played with them more) just have a better feel with them. With my TBS I can play slower spinups/loops as well as more direct quick shots. with the inner carbon blades that i have prob used for over a year i just couldn't get that contrast.
 
says The trick to lose the sight of big picture is to focus...
says The trick to lose the sight of big picture is to focus...
Member
Aug 2013
382
230
1,064
Read 3 reviews
Hello!

A few days ago I found my old Viscaria and glued my rubbers on it. I immediately felt more control and more shots landed on the table.

For the past year I've been using stiga Intensity with various rubbers including tenergy, bluestorm, goldarc, calibra tour.

Viscaria is softer than the Intensity, because even though the Viscaria has carbon and is quite a bit faster, the Intensity has thick Walnut outer ply and is considerably harder than the thin Koto layer used in the Viscaria. The Viscaria has been used for 5 years and Intensity for 3. So both blades have broken in and gotten as soft as they're gonna get.

My initial thoughts immediately after the switch is that the throw angle of the Viscaria is lower and I could use more power without worrying that the ball would fly off the table, the Intensity in the other hand throws the ball higher. If not in perfect position, Viscaria gave that extra kick that allows you to play softer, Intensity has less dwell and requires more power to get a similar result, making out of position shots and in general weird shots harder to get back in.

I'll keep using it for a few weeks to see how my game will change according to the blade.

So far I think that there is more to the control of a blade than just speed/control. Hardness, stiffness and throw also play a big role.

Have you guys encountered something similar with your equipment?
Yeah, when I improve my technique over a period of time, I feel that I can easily handle what I wasn't able to handle a few months/years ago.
 
  • Like
Reactions: NextLevel
This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Member
Dec 2018
417
454
1,477
Read 1 reviews
It's a balancing act between flex, hardness and weight. There's no perfect, and no ideal for everyone, but the Butterfly designers came as close as anyone could. The first Viscaria went on sale November 21, 1993, and the most recent one was sold probably as you're reading this. Today most blade manufacturers sell at least one Viscaria clone. Butterfly currently sells 5. It has to be one of the most successful pieces of sporting equipment of the last 50 years.
 
This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Well-Known Member
Oct 2014
12,908
18,582
46,618
Read 17 reviews
It's a balancing act between flex, hardness and weight. There's no perfect, and no ideal for everyone, but the Butterfly designers came as close as anyone could. The first Viscaria went on sale November 21, 1993, and the most recent one was sold probably as you're reading this. Today most blade manufacturers sell at least one Viscaria clone. Butterfly currently sells 5. It has to be one of the most successful pieces of sporting equipment of the last 50 years.
Subtle changes over time but still largely the same concept.
 
Top