How to play for a professional club like FC SAARBRÜCKEN-TT in the Bundesliga?

This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Member
Feb 2023
178
66
369
Not just in the US but in any part of the world. It is normal to come into the Bundesliga in a lower division and play your way up on merit while learning the league into a higher division. And between being a foreign national (limited spots for players who are not EU citizens) and performance pressures, there are lots of world class players in the lower divisions.

It is borderline delusional not to be a world class star and expect to debut in divisions 1. Even the German top talents do debut in division one, they play their way up because they start the lower leagues at a younger age.

Even in the lower leagues, there are sometimes opportunities to play the top league or for the top league to have a player need to get some reps in a lower division. If you are serious about TT and sure to perform, it is a good place to develop skill. Again, there are lots of players who played at an extremely high level (top 100 WR or 2700‐2800 USATT) who never did better than division 2 in German league. It is extremely competitive.
As a swiss citizen, is it possible to join the lower German Leagues?
 
This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Well-Known Member
Oct 2014
12,908
18,582
46,619
Read 17 reviews
As a swiss citizen, is it possible to join the lower German Leagues?
Of course, obviously, the team needs to want you and travel and earnings can be a concern, but while I am not familiar with the details of registering and playing, for the most part, if you are an EU citizen, you don't count against the international quota. There can't be more than one international player (non-EU) fielded in any match. Many players that some might think are international can have dual citizenship, so it isn't always easy to figure out what is happening, but someone like Kanak, once a team has him, they can't play anyone else international in that match at the same time, even on the bench. This was why LYJ and TH couldn't play at the same time for Neu-Ulm. IT was always Dima, Truls and one but not both of them if possible.
 
This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Member
Feb 2020
179
120
305
I've played in the German (lowest 3) leagues for about 10 years. Basically, every small village in Germany used to have a "Tischtennisverein" of some sort. So this is a table tennis club where people who like to play table tennis get together and play table tennis. There are leagues organized in a hierarchical manner. The club decides who is on the team, and that depends on whether you can commit to play the (usually) weekends when there are games. Everyone can join the club (but you have to become a member), it doesn't matter where you are from. Of course you pay the dues and you don't get paid anything.
Next step is you keep playing, get known, and move up into the higher leagues. Depending on how high the leagues are in the hierarchy, they are local (say a 50mile radius around the village), then it goes up to the "land" which means the state in Germany, say the "Oberliga Herren Bayern", then there is the federal league, the "Bundesliga".
You can pretty much compare yourself with the top German players, there are YT videos of various clubs in various leagues.
As an example, see this video. He (older than U15 obviously) plays "Oberliga" and has a 2206 rating in Germany. He was champion in one of the states in 2019. This link shows the German TT hierarchy. So "Oberliga" is the 5th league from the top, just to level set.

So your better bet given that Germany has free college for everyone who is admitted is:
* Learn German really well (e.g. Goetheinstitut)
* Do really good in high school
* Study for a marketable degree, e.g. computer science or some sort of engineering, in Germany
* Play table tennis in the college or local team

If you are not at QTTR 2000 at age 15 you probably won't become a pro, just google "Deutsche Tischtennisjugendmeisterschaft" and take the first link "U15".
 
Last edited:
This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Member
Feb 2023
178
66
369
I've played in the German (lowest 3) leagues for about 10 years. Basically, every small village in Germany used to have a "Tischtennisverein" of some sort. So this is a table tennis club where people who like to play table tennis get together and play table tennis. There are leagues organized in a hierarchical manner. The club decides who is on the team, and that depends on whether you can commit to play the (usually) weekends when there are games. Everyone can join the club (but you have to become a member), it doesn't matter where you are from. Of course you pay the dues and you don't get paid anything.
Next step is you keep playing, get known, and move up into the higher leagues. Depending on how high the leagues are in the hierarchy, they are local (say a 50mile radius around the village), then it goes up to the "land" which means the state in Germany, say the "Oberliga Herren Bayern", then there is the federal league, the "Bundesliga".
You can pretty much compare yourself with the top German U15 players, there are YT videos of various clubs in various leagues.
As an example, see this video. He plays "Oberliga" and has a 2206 rating in Germany. He was champion in one of the states in 2019. This link shows the German TT hierarchy. So "Oberliga" is the 5th league from the top, just to level set.

So your better bet given that Germany has free college for everyone who is admitted is:
* Learn German really well (e.g. Goetheinstitut)
* Do really good in high school
* Study for a marketable degree, e.g. computer science or some sort of engineering, in Germany
* Play table tennis in the college or local team

If you are not at ~2000 at age 15 you won't become a pro, just google "Deutsche Tischtennisjugendmeisterschaft" and take the first link "U15".
Thanks @NextLevel and @ejprinz. Very educational!
 
  • Like
Reactions: UpSideDownCarl

Brs

This user has no status.

Brs

This user has no status.
Well-Known Member
Oct 2015
1,113
1,391
2,629
I've played in the German (lowest 3) leagues for about 10 years. Basically, every small village in Germany used to have a "Tischtennisverein" of some sort. So this is a table tennis club where people who like to play table tennis get together and play table tennis. There are leagues organized in a hierarchical manner. The club decides who is on the team, and that depends on whether you can commit to play the (usually) weekends when there are games. Everyone can join the club (but you have to become a member), it doesn't matter where you are from. Of course you pay the dues and you don't get paid anything.
Next step is you keep playing, get known, and move up into the higher leagues. Depending on how high the leagues are in the hierarchy, they are local (say a 50mile radius around the village), then it goes up to the "land" which means the state in Germany, say the "Oberliga Herren Bayern", then there is the federal league, the "Bundesliga".
You can pretty much compare yourself with the top German U15 players, there are YT videos of various clubs in various leagues.
As an example, see this video. He plays "Oberliga" and has a 2206 rating in Germany. He was champion in one of the states in 2019. This link shows the German TT hierarchy. So "Oberliga" is the 5th league from the top, just to level set.

So your better bet given that Germany has free college for everyone who is admitted is:
* Learn German really well (e.g. Goetheinstitut)
* Do really good in high school
* Study for a marketable degree, e.g. computer science or some sort of engineering, in Germany
* Play table tennis in the college or local team

If you are not at ~2000 at age 15 you won't become a pro, just google "Deutsche Tischtennisjugendmeisterschaft" and take the first link "U15".
2000 ttr i assume, so 2300ish us?
 
  • Like
Reactions: UpSideDownCarl
This user has no status.
This user has no status.
Member
Jun 2022
390
304
962
2000 ttr i assume, so 2300ish us?
Seth Pech, who was rated above 2400 in US some time ago has a current QTTR of 1993 playing in germany in the 3rd team of Hilpoltstein.
1708991245957.png
 
says .
says .
Member
Feb 2019
270
238
525
Read 2 reviews
Kanak Jha, who is by faaaaaar the best player in the US, is very average Bundesliga player. No other us-American would be able to play Bundesliga.
So, if you consider yourself to be able to become (by far) the best player in the US, you can play Bundesliga.
As you’re already 15 years old - forget your dream, learn something normal…
As an example, Timo Boll played Bundesliga with 14 years, Patrick Franziska with 17 years
 
Top