Complete video guide: How to cut and glue rubbers on a table tennis bat

says EJ-Victim
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Amazing information. Some recommendation about which kind of varnish is better to use? Thanks, you are so kind for answering all the questions
Search for a polyurethaan water-based varnish/lacquer. If possible matte, with flexible caracteristics. (some vloor lacquers are perfectly suitable for sealing blades)
I apply it very thinly with a sponge just like glue. After it dries use a sandpaper like 240 grit and sand it lightly. It will help the glue to adhere to the blade.
 
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Search for a polyurethaan water-based varnish/lacquer. If possible matte, with flexible caracteristics. (some vloor lacquers are perfectly suitable for sealing blades)
I apply it very thinly with a sponge just like glue. After it dries use a sandpaper like 240 grit and sand it lightly. It will help the glue to adhere to the blade
Thanks for your comment, so useful and practical. I will do it in this way. I could see in your profile that you use material from Sanwei. How is you experience with the Gear Hyper, I will receive soon some of their products for testing, including this one, andhaving your experience will be fantastic. Regards.
 

NDH

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Loved it - therapeutic to watch too!

I have struggled with these blades - oil may be a key. How often do you change blade? (they aren't cheap)
IMG_6110.jpeg



Use a surgical blade - You can pick up 100 for a few quid online.

You can get a few cut jobs from each blade, or, you can do what I do and change it every time for the best performance (and given I only do it twice a year, the pack or 100 will last me the rest of my playing career!)

I’ve literally just done this one in the pic (weird glue residue from my Dignics….. never had that before!)
 
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Use a surgical blade - You can pick up 100 for a few quid online.

You can get a few cut jobs from each blade, or, you can do what I do and change it every time for the best performance (and given I only do it twice a year, the pack or 100 will last me the rest of my playing career!)

I’ve literally just done this one in the pic (weird glue residue from my Dignics….. never had that before!)
Nice - that's a top job! Any particular surgical blade you use?
 
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I have the soft 37 degree on the backhand and I have nothing to complain about it.
Very grippy, durable. predictable too. Not like the ball will bounce off your blade like a rocket.
I think it’s a rubber you can get used to very well.
Thanks for this information, so useful. Amazing experience behind. I will ask you couple of more thing when I will have the material with me
 
says EJ-Victim
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I bought this one, as it came with 6 blades already (which for me, would be 3-4 years worth).


The replacement blades are cheap as chips as well.
Can confirm scalpel blade #10a worked like a charm.
I also used scalpel #23. The cutting edge is round

I’ve just returned to very sharps scissors. I’m satisfied with the result using quality sharp scissors.
It’s fast too.
 
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My first attempt with a blade since using scissors for a year - really pleased with how it turned out. Drop of oil and the serrated blade (new) - not perfect but pretty good. Thanks for the inspiration..
 

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Finally finished a complete video instructional guide for how to cut, glue, and assemble a table tennis bat from scratch. Recognise there are other really experienced people here who are also great at setting up bats - this was my method.

Background: A film student approached me to ask if I'd volunteer to be a subject in an assignment to make a sports documentary. I consented and also took the opportunity to video an instructional guide on how to assemble a table tennis bat - I've been setting up bats since 2018.

While I'm looking forward to seeing the final result of that documentary project, I've whipped up a simple edit of the guide.

I've been wanting to do it for over a year now so I was glad for the opportunity to share some knowledge and experience.

Hope this video helps someone!

Very therapeutic to watch as well
 
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My first attempt with a blade since using scissors for a year - really pleased with how it turned out. Drop of oil and the serrated blade (new) - not perfect but pretty good. Thanks for the inspiration..
Glad it helped motivate you to have a go at it - practice makes perfect 😏
 
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Everyone is different. So, this is not anything but information. I have cut my rubbers with a blade as in the video, I have seen people use various versions of razor, scalpel, xacto....I have seen people who use scissors.

For a long time I cut with a blade. When I played at this club in NYC's Chinatown, I remember watching the guy who ran the club cutting with scissors. It was really effing fast and his cuts always came out perfect. As good as those cuts with the blade. Mine never did. But I did learn that, there were two things with cutting with a scissor.
1) Starting: you have to know how to start the cut to avoid the handle.
2) Practice: if you have done enough of them, and you have seen someone who knows how to do it, maybe getting a few tips, you can get decent at it.

Again, my cutting never looked perfect. But for me, I never cared if it looked perfect. For me, the fact that it took 1/8th the time to cut with scissors and was pretty darn good--neat enough--was good enough for me. All you need to cut with scissors, is a good sharp scissor. You don't need a special scissor. You don't need one with a curved blade. A good sharp scissor is all you need. A little oil on the scissor will help just like it will with a scalpel or a sharp hand held razor like the one in The_TT_Bat_Guy's video, or the scapel cut that NDH showed.

The video is good: if you want the cut to be as close to perfect as you can get as soon in your TT playing as possible, go that way. If you are willing to have the cut not quite as perfect until you really master how to cut with scissors, but have the cut need no extra equipment, no cutting surface, and done once and done, scissors work well also.

It really depends on the person.

To start out the cut with a scissor:
a) You need to have the scissor angled so the scissor handles are not in the way of the blade handle; they can be angled so that they are below the handle and pulling the rubber a little down towards the blade, or the opposite.
b) Until you are fully past the handle, you need to make tiny cuts; if you use the part of the scissor near the handle so the scissors are opened, it is easier, if you are closer to the tip of the blade as you cut, it is harder to cut.
c) Once you are past the handle being in the way, it is easy until you get near the wing and handle at the end of the cut. Then you may need to go back to little cuts and an angle that lets you avoid having the blade and handle get in the way of each other.

So, it does take technique. There are some things that make it much easier if you see someone who is good at it do the cutting and can learn those details that make the scissor work well. But if you get those skills under your belt, it is a very easy way to cut and with very little fuss and hassle.

I do believe there are some good videos on cutting with scissors. 10-15 years ago, I know there were several.

So, as long as people know that there are pros and cons to using either scissors or a blade, then you can make the choice that suits you best.
 
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Everyone is different. So, this is not anything but information. I have cut my rubbers with a blade as in the video, I have seen people use various versions of razor, scalpel, xacto....I have seen people who use scissors.

For a long time I cut with a blade. When I played at this club in NYC's Chinatown, I remember watching the guy who ran the club cutting with scissors. It was really effing fast and his cuts always came out perfect. As good as those cuts with the blade. Mine never did. But I did learn that, there were two things with cutting with a scissor.
1) Starting: you have to know how to start the cut to avoid the handle.
2) Practice: if you have done enough of them, and you have seen someone who knows how to do it, maybe getting a few tips, you can get decent at it.

Again, my cutting never looked perfect. But for me, I never cared if it looked perfect. For me, the fact that it took 1/8th the time to cut with scissors and was pretty darn good--neat enough--was good enough for me. All you need to cut with scissors, is a good sharp scissor. You don't need a special scissor. You don't need one with a curved blade. A good sharp scissor is all you need. A little oil on the scissor will help just like it will with a scalpel or a sharp hand held razor like the one in The_TT_Bat_Guy's video, or the scapel cut that NDH showed.

The video is good: if you want the cut to be as close to perfect as you can get as soon in your TT playing as possible, go that way. If you are willing to have the cut not quite as perfect until you really master how to cut with scissors, but have the cut need no extra equipment, no cutting surface, and done once and done, scissors work well also.

It really depends on the person.

To start out the cut with a scissor:
a) You need to have the scissor angled so the scissor handles are not in the way of the blade handle; they can be angled so that they are below the handle and pulling the rubber a little down towards the blade, or the opposite.
b) Until you are fully past the handle, you need to make tiny cuts; if you use the part of the scissor near the handle so the scissors are opened, it is easier, if you are closer to the tip of the blade as you cut, it is harder to cut.
c) Once you are past the handle being in the way, it is easy until you get near the wing and handle at the end of the cut. Then you may need to go back to little cuts and an angle that lets you avoid having the blade and handle get in the way of each other.

So, it does take technique. There are some things that make it much easier if you see someone who is good at it do the cutting and can learn those details that make the scissor work well. But if you get those skills under your belt, it is a very easy way to cut and with very little fuss and hassle.

I do believe there are some good videos on cutting with scissors. 10-15 years ago, I know there were several.

So, as long as people know that there are pros and cons to using either scissors or a blade, then you can make the choice that suits you best.
Charlie from Blades by Charlie plays at my club, and I've seen him assemble rackets with a razor blade. He does it sooooo friggin fast. One rapid stroke to score the sponge, and another rapid stroke to cut through the sponge and topsheet, then a couple others for insurance. The whole process takes him like 10 seconds, and the cuts are always perfect.
 
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Charlie from Blades by Charlie plays at my club, and I've seen him assemble rackets with a razor blade. He does it sooooo friggin fast. One rapid stroke to score the sponge, and another rapid stroke to cut through the sponge and topsheet, then a couple others for insurance. The whole process takes him like 10 seconds, and the cuts are always perfect.

If anyone here did not know, the hand made blades that Charlie from Blades by Charlie makes are pretty freaking amazing.

Years ago, I got to try out three blades that he made for a friend named Rocky. I am pretty sure Charlie will know who I mean with just that name. They were, all three, not just amazing, but three of the 4 best blades I have ever felt. Rocky also had the 4th best blade I ever felt which was a Stiga Clipper from 1990. :)

For someone cutting in their home, even just not needing a surface for cutting can, for some, make things easier. Again, it is a choice. Either method works. In the long run you get to the same place where the cut looks professional and perfect....for me close enough is good enough....the question is, what tools would you prefer for cutting. And each person can make that choice him/herself.

I put the post I did in because, if the word "Complete" is in the title of the thread and only cutting with a blade is mentioned, adding information about scissors could make the information in the thread more complete. :)
 
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